ICARUS cryostat and detector finally reunited

On 12 October, the ICARUS cryostat was extracted from Building 156 and brought to the front of Building 185, where the ICARUS detector is. Next, the detector will be inserted into it, and at the end of the year, shipped to Fermilab.

After a short but spectacular trip, the first enormous ICARUS cryostat was reunited with its detector. The ICARUS detector, consisting of two modules, has been refurbished over the past several months, as part of the CERN Neutrino Platform programme. It was previously used at the Gran Sasso Laboratory in Italy.

A brand new aluminium cryostat has been assembled in building 156, after an engineering feat to rotate and weld the module into place. On 12 October, the new cryostat was moved in front of building 185 to meet its detector.

The operation will be repeated with the second module soon. ICARUS will then be shipped to Fermilab, near Chicago in the US, to be part of the Short Baseline Neutrino (SBN) programme, in the beginning of 2017.

Find out more about what happened previously here.

ICARUS,Experiments and Tracks
The aluminum cryostat, which will contain one of the two ICARUS twin detector modules, was assembled and welded together in Building 156 over the past few months. (Image: Didier Steyaert/CERN)

ICARUS
On 12 October, the cryostat was carefully extracted from the workshop of Building 156. (Image: M. Brice/CERN)

ICARUS
It was loaded onto a big lorry... (Image: M. Brice/CERN)

ICARUS
...and extremely carefully manoeuvred through the streets of CERN’s Meyrin site... (Image: M. Brice/CERN)

ICARUS,Experiments and Tracks
...to the front of Building 185. (Image: S. Bennet/CERN)