CERN: Press release https://home.cern/ en Two high-school teams from Italy and Mexico win the CERN Beamline for Schools competition https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/two-high-school-teams-italy-and-mexico-win-cern-beamline-schools <span>Two high-school teams from Italy and Mexico win the CERN Beamline for Schools competition</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/18835" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mailys</span></span> <span>Wed, 06/23/2021 - 09:12</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-listing-img field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/home.web.cern.ch/files/2021-06/BL4S_collage.png" width="4200" height="4200" alt="CERN Beamline for Schools 2021 winners" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-caption field--type-string-long field--label-hidden field--item">Winners of the CERN Beamline for Schools 2021: Team Teomiztli (above) from the Escuela Nacional Preparatoria Plantel 2 (Mexico City, Mexico / Image: Escuela Nacional Preparatoria Plantel 2); and Team EXTRA (below) from the Liceo Scientifico Statale A. Scacchi (Bari, Italy / Image: Liceo Scientifico Statale A. Scacchi)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Geneva and Hamburg, 23 June 2021. Two teams of high-school students from the <a href="https://liceoscacchibari.edu.it/index.php">Liceo Scientifico Statale “A. Scacchi”</a> (Bari, Italy) and from the <a href="http://www.prepa2.unam.mx/index.html">Escuela Nacional Preparatoria “Plantel 2”</a> (Mexico City, Mexico) have won the prestigious <a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/">CERN Beamline for Schools</a> competition. The prize this year is a trip to the DESY research centre in Hamburg, Germany, in autumn 2021, to carry out their proposed experiments with the support of scientists from CERN and DESY.  </p> <p>Beamline for Schools (BL4S) is a global physics competition for high-school students. Teams are invited to submit a proposal for an experiment that uses a beamline. Beamlines, operated at laboratories like CERN and DESY, provide fluxes of subatomic particles that can be used for diverse scientific experiments in different disciplines. During the second Long Shutdown of CERN’s accelerators for maintenance and upgrades, the partnership with DESY allowed the competition to continue. After the success of the 2019 and 2020 editions, the German laboratory will host the winning teams again in September 2021.</p> <p>“DESY is very pleased to welcome the Beamline for Schools competition,” says Ties Behnke, DESY’s Director in charge of Particle Physics. “The initiative clearly shows how attractive fundamental research can be to young people. I am very much looking forward to welcoming the winning teams to DESY this autumn, and to observe the experiments take shape.”</p> <p>Since the competition was launched in 2014, more than 12 000 students from 91 countries have participated. This year, despite the difficulties faced by schools during the COVID-19 pandemic, a record number of 289 teams representing 57 countries submitted a proposal. From the applicants, 26 teams from 22 countries were shortlisted, eight teams from eight countries were selected for a Special Mention, and one team, representing India and Sweden, was awarded for the most creative video proposal. “Some of the winners of the first editions of BL4S have come back to CERN as members of the experimental collaborations after their studies,” says Margherita Boselli, BL4S project manager. “We hope that we can continue contributing to training the next generation of scientists.”</p> <p>“I am impressed by the number of participants this year,” says Joachim Mnich, Director for Research and Computing at CERN. “The students’ increasing interest in the competition over the past editions clearly shows that it is getting more and more attractive every year.”</p> <p>The experiments proposed by the winners of the eighth edition show the deep understanding that high-school students can have of modern particle physics. The Italian team “EXTRA” proposes to investigate the transition radiation effect, where X-ray photons are produced when a beam of high-energy electrons crosses the interface between materials with different optical properties. To study this phenomenon, the students will need to find a smart way to discriminate the signals produced by the particles in the beam from those produced by the X-ray photons.</p> <p>“Thanks to BL4S, we are involved in a real research experiment that taught us the value of everyone’s contribution to a common project and gave us a purpose during the pandemic,” state Domenico Soriano and Vittorio Zupo from the EXTRA team in their proposal. “We are grateful and honoured for this opportunity.”</p> <p>The experiment proposed by the Mexican team “Teomiztli” focuses on Cherenkov radiation: the production of electromagnetic radiation when high-energy particles travel through certain materials. The goal of the Teomiztli team is to compare the production of Cherenkov radiation in different materials and contribute to applying this phenomenon in the development of particle detectors.</p> <p>“Winning the first prize is a great achievement because it will help us promote science in Mexico and help younger people get interested in particle physics and science in general,” says Ilse Buendía from the Teomiztli team.</p> <p>Beamline for Schools is an education and outreach project funded by the <a href="https://cernandsocietyfoundation.cern/">CERN &amp; Society Foundation</a> and supported by individual donors, foundations and private enterprises. The eighth edition is partly supported by the Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Foundation, with additional contributions from the Arconic Foundation, the Amgen Switzerland, and the Ernest Solvay Fund, managed by the King Baudouin Foundation.</p> <p>“What makes BL4S special among student competitions is that the students carry out their own research projects at a research institute such as CERN or DESY. This undoubtedly leads to greater motivation towards scientific careers and a sustained interest in physics and, therefore, the initiative perfectly fits our goals as a foundation,” says Dr Stefan Jorda, Managing Director of the Wilhelm und Else Heraeus Foundation.</p> <p>Further information:</p> <ul><li> <p>BL4S website: <a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/">https://beamlineforschools.cern/</a></p> </li> <li> <p>2021 edition: <a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/editions/2021-edition">https://beamlineforschools.cern/editions/2021-edition</a></p> </li> <li> <p>Shortlisted and special mention teams 2021: <a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/results_2021">https://beamlineforschools.cern/results_2021</a></p> </li> <li> <p>Previous winners: <a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/bl4s-competition/winners">https://beamlineforschools.cern/bl4s-competition/winners</a></p> </li> </ul><p>About CERN:</p> <p>CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is one of the world's leading laboratories for particle physics. The Organization is located on the French-Swiss border, with its headquarters in Geneva. Its Member States are: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Cyprus, Estonia and Slovenia are Associate Member States in the pre-stage to Membership. Croatia, India, Lithuania, Pakistan, Turkey and Ukraine are Associate Member States. The European Union, Japan, JINR, the Russian Federation, UNESCO and the United States of America currently have Observer status.</p> <p>About the CERN &amp; Society Foundation:</p> <p>The CERN &amp; Society Foundation is a charitable foundation established by CERN to fund a programme of projects. These projects, in the areas of education and outreach, innovation and knowledge exchange, and culture and creativity, are inspired or enabled by CERN, but lie outside of its specific research mandate. The Foundation seeks the support of individuals, trusts, foundations and commercial companies to help make these projects happen, and spread the CERN spirit of scientific curiosity for the inspiration and benefit of society.</p> <p>About DESY:</p> <p>DESY is one of the world’s leading particle accelerator centres. Researchers use the large scale facilities at DESY to explore the microcosm in all its variety – ranging from the interaction of tiny elementary particles to the behaviour of innovative nanomaterials, the vital processes that take place between biomolecules and the great mysteries of the universe. The accelerators and detectors that DESY develops and builds at its locations in Hamburg and Zeuthen are unique research tools. DESY is a member of the Helmholtz Association, and receives its funding from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) (90 per cent) and the German federal states of Hamburg and Brandenburg (10 per cent).</p> <p>Extra info:</p> <p>- Countries represented by the shortlisted teams: Argentina, Austria, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Czech Republic, Germany, Hong Kong SAR China, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Morocco, Nepal, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States.</p> <p>- Countries represented in the Special Mention teams: Canada, Cyprus, Italy, Pakistan, Peru, Turkey, United Kingdom, and United States.</p> </div> Wed, 23 Jun 2021 07:12:47 +0000 mailys 157449 at https://home.cern CERN lays first stone of Science Gateway https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/cern-lays-first-stone-science-gateway <span>CERN lays first stone of Science Gateway</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/29677" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sandrika</span></span> <span>Mon, 06/21/2021 - 08:50</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2773478" data-filename="4_202106-082_272" id="CERN-PHOTO-202106-082-4"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202106-082-4" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="First Stone Ceremony for Science Gateway" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202106-082-4/file?size=large"/> </a> <figcaption> The first stone with the newly unveiled logo of the CERN Science Gateway. Its underlying concept is to anchor the project and its mission to CERN. At the core is a collision, from which the architecture of the iconic building rises. From left to right: Renzo Piano, Fabiola Gianotti, Antonio Hodgers and John Elkann. <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Today, CERN held a first stone ceremony for Science Gateway, the Laboratory’s new flagship project for science education and outreach. Fabiola Gianotti, CERN’s Director-General, John Elkann, Chairman of Stellantis and the FCA Foundation, the main donor, Renzo Piano, architect and founder of Renzo Piano Building Workshop, and Geneva <span style="background-color:null;">State Co</span>uncillor Antonio Hodgers, speaking on behalf of the Swiss host authorities, were present to mark the successful start of its construction. Ursula Bassler, President of the CERN Council, contributed to the ceremony remotely. Representatives from CERN Member and Associate Member States, Host States and many other partners were also in attendance at the ceremony.</p> <p>When the Laboratory opened in 1954, its Convention already promoted openness and commitment to education and outreach. Almost seventy years and over two million visitors later, CERN is increasing its capacity to welcome visitors of all ages, from near and far and extending its educational portfolio with a view to increasingly inspiring future generations towards science and research. Hundreds of thousands of visitors per year will have the opportunity to go on a captivating journey through the science, the discoveries and the technology at CERN, guided by the people who make it all possible.</p> <p>Scheduled to open in 2023, the CERN Science Gateway has environmental sustainability at its core. It will be an iconic, carbon-neutral building and a local landmark, surrounded by a 400-tree freshly-planted forest. Closely connected to the CERN campus, the Science Gateway will also feature a modular 900-seat auditorium, immersive spaces, laboratories for hands-on activities for visitors from age 5 up, and many other interactive learning opportunities.</p> <p>An exhibition on the Esplanade des Particules details the project and its connection to CERN.</p> <p>“I would like to express my deepest gratitude to the many partners in our Member and Associate Member States and beyond who are making the CERN Science Gateway possible, in particular to our generous donors. The challenging times we’ve been through over the past 18 months have demonstrated the enduring value and the necessity of science and the need for cooperation across borders. Science brings people together and shows what humanity can achieve when we put our differences aside and focus on the common good. Science gives hope and trust in a better future. We want the CERN Science Gateway to inspire all those who come to visit with the beauty and the values of science,” said CERN Director-General Fabiola Gianotti during her opening speech.</p> <p>“It is with joy and pride that we are launching today this ambitious project where, thanks to the collaboration of different skills, nationalities and languages, we will build a place of exchange and knowledge. A bridge, forever bridges! A glass bridge, which links the different themes and parts of Science Gateway while also allowing a physical encounter between researchers and children, visitors and physicists, tourists and scientists, all driven by curiosity and the thirst for knowledge,” said Renzo Piano, the internationally renowned architect, whose notable buildings include the Zentrum Paul Klee in Bern, the Pompidou Centre in Paris, and the Shard in London.</p> <p>“At Stellantis we strongly believe in the importance of education, with an emphasis in the fields of science and technology.” said John Elkann, Chairman of Stellantis and the FCA Foundation. “Supporting STEM education has proven to be the most effective way to keep our societies open and safe as we have learned this last year by overcoming the Covid-19 crisis.”</p> <p>“CERN Science Gateway is a great way to democratise scientific research and a spectacular entrance gate to Geneva,” said Antonio<span style="background-color:null;"> Hodgers,</span> Geneva State Councillor in charge of Territorial Planning, speaking on behalf of the Swiss host authorities.</p> <p>“We will do our best, not only in the construction and operation of the Science Gateway, but also more widely, to ensure that science maintains a place of integrity and trustworthiness, of international collaboration aiming for peace”, said Ursula Bassler, President of the CERN Council.</p> <figure class="cds-video" id="CERN-VIDEO-2021-019-001"><div><iframe allowfullscreen="true" frameborder="0" height="450" src="//cds.cern.ch/video/CERN-VIDEO-2021-019-001" width="100%"></iframe></div> <figcaption>Highlights of the the Science Gateway first stone ceremony on 21st June 2021<span> (Video: CERN)</span></figcaption></figure><p>____</p> <p><strong>Audiovisual material:</strong></p> <p>Webcast record of the ceremony (for the CERN community): <a href="https://webcast.web.cern.ch/event/i1046896">https://webcast.web.cern.ch/event/i1046896</a></p> <p>Video (download): <a href="https://videos.cern.ch/record/2773601" title="https://videos.cern.ch/record/2773601">https://videos.cern.ch/ record/2773601</a></p> <p>Short "highlights" video (download): <a href="https://videos.cern.ch/record/2773686">https://videos.cern.ch/record/2773686</a></p> <p>Photos: <a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2773478?ln=en">https://cds.cern.ch/record/2773478?ln=en</a><br />              <a href="https://home.cern/resources/image/cern/cern-science-gateway">https://home.cern/resources/image/cern/cern-science-gateway</a></p> </div> Mon, 21 Jun 2021 06:50:30 +0000 sandrika 157256 at https://home.cern Latvia to join CERN as an Associate Member State https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/latvia-join-cern-associate-member-state <span>Latvia to join CERN as an Associate Member State</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/139" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ssanchis</span></span> <span>Wed, 04/14/2021 - 08:27</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2763410" data-filename="202104-049_135" id="CERN-PHOTO-202104-049-17"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202104-049-17" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="His Excellency Dr Arturs Krišjānis Kariņš Prime Minister Republic of Latvia" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202104-049-17/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> His Excellency Krišjānis Kariņš, Prime Minister Republic of Latvia and Fabiola Gianotti, CERN Director-General, on the occasion of the remote signature of the agreement between the Republic of Latvia and CERN granting the status of Associate Member State of CERN to the Republic of Latvia. <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Representatives of CERN and the Republic of Latvia gathered in a virtual ceremony today to sign an Agreement admitting Latvia into the Organization as an Associate Member State. The Associate Membership will enter into force once CERN has been informed that all the necessary accession and ratification processes have been completed by Latvia. Latvia is the third of the Baltic States to join the CERN family after agreements were signed with Lithuania and Estonia in recent years. </p> <p>“We are delighted to welcome Latvia as a new Associate Member State,” said Fabiola Gianotti, CERN Director-General, at the signing ceremony. “The present Agreement contributes to strengthening the ties between CERN and Latvia, thereby offering  opportunities for the further growth of particle physics in Latvia through partnership in research, technological development and education.”  </p> <p>“As we become CERN’s newest Associate Member State, we look forward to enhancing our contribution to the Organization’s major scientific endeavours, as well as to investing the unparalleled scientific and technological excellence gained by this membership in further building the economy and well-being of our societies,” said Krišjānis Kariņš, Latvia’s Prime Minister. “Over the last years, the Latvian scientific community has already participated in various CERN projects, and now the status of CERN Associate Member State will allow us to cooperate closer on advancing the scientific excellence of Europe.”</p> <p>Latvia became involved in CERN activities in the early 1990s and has participated, through its leading research institutions, in activities spanning accelerator and detector technology, power electronics, robotics, data processing and other domains. In 1996, this involvement led to a contribution, through the country’s Institute of Electronics and Computer Science, to the Hadron Calorimeter of the <a href="https://home.cern/science/experiments/cms">CMS detector</a>, one of the four main experiments at CERN’s flagship accelerator, the <a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">Large Hadron Collider</a> (LHC).</p> <p>A series of agreements in the 2010s, including a Framework Collaboration Agreement in 2012 and a Cooperation Agreement in 2016, intensified and formalised the relations between CERN and Latvia. Riga Technical University (RTU) joined the study group for the <a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/future-circular-collider">Future Circular Collider</a> in 2015 and a consortium of the University of Latvia and RTU then joined the CMS collaboration in 2017. This framework also provided opportunities for Latvian researchers to participate in CERN’s activities through PhD theses and project associateships.</p> <p>As an Associate Member State, Latvia will be entitled to appoint representatives to attend meetings of the CERN Council and Finance Committee. Its nationals will be eligible for limited-duration staff positions and fellowships, and its industry will be entitled to bid for CERN contracts, increasing opportunities for industrial collaboration in advanced technologies.</p> </div> Wed, 14 Apr 2021 06:27:24 +0000 ssanchis 156809 at https://home.cern ALPHA cools antimatter using laser light for the first time https://home.cern/news/press-release/experiments/alpha-cools-antimatter-using-laser-light-first-time <span>ALPHA cools antimatter using laser light for the first time</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/147" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cagrigor</span></span> <span>Tue, 03/30/2021 - 16:25</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2121303" data-filename="MAX_7755" id="CERN-PHOTO-201601-005-5"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201601-005-5" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Alpha Experiment in 2016" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201601-005-5/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Alpha Experiment <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Geneva, 31 March 2021. The ALPHA collaboration at CERN has succeeded in cooling down antihydrogen atoms – the simplest form of atomic antimatter – using laser light. The technique, known as laser cooling, was first demonstrated 40 years ago on normal matter and is a mainstay of many research fields. Its first application to antihydrogen by ALPHA, described in a paper published today in <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-03289-6"><em>Nature</em></a>, opens the door to considerably more precise measurements of the internal structure of antihydrogen and of how it behaves under the influence of gravity. Comparing such measurements with those of the well-studied hydrogen atom could reveal differences between matter and antimatter atoms. Such differences, if present, could shed light on why the universe is made up of matter only, an imbalance known as matter–antimatter asymmetry.</p> <p>“The ability to laser-cool antihydrogen atoms is a game-changer for spectroscopic and gravitational measurements, and it could lead to new perspectives in antimatter research, such as the creation of antimatter molecules and the development of anti-atom interferometry,” says ALPHA spokesperson, Jeffrey Hangst. “We’re over the moon. About a decade ago, laser cooling of antimatter was in the realm of science fiction.”</p> <p>The <a href="https://home.cern/science/experiments/alpha">ALPHA</a> team makes antihydrogen atoms by taking antiprotons from CERN’s <a href="https://home.cern/about/accelerators/antiproton-decelerator">Antiproton Decelerator</a> and binding them with positrons originating from a sodium-22 source. It then confines the resulting antihydrogen atoms in a magnetic trap, which prevents them from coming into contact with matter and annihilating. Next, the team typically performs spectroscopic studies, that is, it measures the anti-atoms’ response to electromagnetic radiation – laser light or microwaves. These studies have allowed the team to, for example, <a href="https://home.cern/news/news/physics/new-era-precision-antimatter-research">measure the 1S–2S electronic transition in antihydrogen with unprecedented precision</a>. However, the precision of such spectroscopic measurements and of planned future measurements of the behaviour of antihydrogen in the Earth’s gravitational field in <a href="https://home.cern/news/news/experiments/new-antimatter-gravity-experiments-begin-cern">ongoing experiments</a> is limited by the kinetic energy or, equivalently, the temperature, of the antiatoms.</p> <p>This is where laser cooling comes in. In this technique, laser photons are absorbed by the atoms, causing them to reach a higher-energy state. The anti-atoms then emit the photons and spontaneously decay back to their initial state. Because the interaction depends on the atoms’ velocity and as the photons impart momentum, repeating this absorption–emission cycle many times leads to cooling of the atoms to a low temperature.</p> <p>In their new study, the ALPHA researchers were able to laser-cool a sample of magnetically trapped antihydrogen atoms by repeatedly driving the anti-atoms from the atoms’ lowest-energy state (the 1S state) to a higher-energy state (2P) using pulsed laser light with a frequency slightly below that of the transition between the two states. After illuminating the trapped atoms for several hours, the researchers observed a more than tenfold decrease in the atoms’ median kinetic energy, with many of the anti-atoms attaining energies below a microeletronvolt (about 0.012 degrees above absolute zero in temperature equivalent).</p> <p>Having successfully laser-cooled the anti-atoms, the researchers investigated how the laser cooling affected a spectroscopic measurement of the 1S–2S transition and found that the cooling resulted in a narrower spectral line for the transition – about four times narrower than that observed without laser cooling. </p> <p>“Our demonstration of laser cooling of antihydrogen atoms and its application to 1S–2S spectroscopy represents the culmination of many years of antimatter research and developments at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator. This is by far the most difficult experiment we have ever done,” says Hangst.</p> <p>“Historically, researchers have struggled to laser-cool normal hydrogen, so this has been a bit of a crazy dream for us for many years,” says Makoto Fujiwara, the first proponent of the idea of using a pulsed laser to cool trapped antihydrogen in ALPHA. “Now, we can dream of even crazier things with antimatter.”</p> <p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" scrolling="no" src="https://videos.cern.ch/video/CERN-FOOTAGE-2021-002-003" width="560"></iframe></p> <p><strong>Further information</strong><br /><a href="https://videos.cern.ch/record/2759406">Video News Release</a><br /><a href="https://alpha.web.cern.ch/virtual-tour-alpha">Virtual tour of ALPHA</a></p> </div> Tue, 30 Mar 2021 14:25:26 +0000 cagrigor 156743 at https://home.cern CERN announces new open data policy in support of open science https://home.cern/news/press-release/knowledge-sharing/cern-announces-new-open-data-policy-support-open-science <span>CERN announces new open data policy in support of open science</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/147" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cagrigor</span></span> <span>Fri, 12/11/2020 - 08:45</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="1306195" data-filename="" id="CERN-CO-1008289-04"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-CO-1008289-04" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="CERN PHOTOWALK 2010 - Computer Centre - Roger Claus" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-CO-1008289-04/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Data storage solutions at the CERN data centre <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Geneva, 11 December 2020. The four main LHC collaborations (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb) have unanimously endorsed a new open data policy for scientific experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which was presented to the CERN Council today.  The policy commits to publicly releasing so-called level 3 scientific data, the type required to make scientific studies, collected by the LHC experiments. Data will start to be released approximately five years after collection, and the aim is for the full dataset to be publicly available by the close of the experiment concerned. The policy addresses the growing movement of open science, which aims to make scientific research more reproducible, accessible, and collaborative.</p> <p>The level 3 data released can contribute to scientific research in particle physics, as well as research in the field of scientific computing, for example to improve reconstruction or analysis methods based on machine learning techniques, an approach that requires rich data sets for training and validation.</p> <blockquote> <p>The open data policy reflects CERN’s commitment to open science, which was already asserted in the CERN Convention over 60 years ago,” said Eckhard Elsen, CERN Director for Research and Computing. “The policy sets out the concrete steps towards its implementation at CERN, which will make data available to the extended scientific community as well as the general public.</p> </blockquote> <p>Scientific data are considered to have different levels of complexity. Level 3 data are of the type used as input to most physics studies and will be released alongside the software and documentation needed to use the data. Its release will allow high-quality analysis by diverse groups: non-CERN scientists, scientists in other fields, educational and outreach initiatives, and the general public.</p> <p>The policy also covers the release of level 1 and level 2 datasets, of which samples are already available. Level 1 corresponds to the supporting information of results published in scientific articles, and level 2 corresponds to dedicated scientific datasets designed for educational and outreach purposes.</p> <p>In practice, scientific datasets will be released through the CERN <a href="http://opendata.cern.ch/">Open Data Portal</a>, which already hosts a comprehensive set of data related to the LHC and other experiments. Data will be available using FAIR standards, a set of data guidelines that ensure the data are findable, accessible, interoperable, and re-usable.</p> <p>“The policy provides a progressive framework for the openness and preservation of experimental data,” said Jamie Boyd, convener of the working group that formulated the policy. This strategy complements CERN’s existing Open Access policy, which mandates that all CERN research results are published in open access. It is also aligned with the recent European Strategy for Particle Physics Update announced in June 2020. The new policy could be used as a blueprint for other experiments at CERN and in other scientific organisations.</p> <p>CERN previously pioneered Open Access to scientific literature with the SCOAP3 consortium, a global partnership of libraries, funding agencies and research institutions from 46 countries and intergovernmental organisations, which is now the largest open access initiative in the world. In addition, CERN collaborates with many organisations, such as the European Commission and UNESCO, on its efforts to promote open science practices beyond particle physics.</p> <p>Further information:</p> <ul><li><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2745133">Link to the CERN Open Data Policy</a></li> <li><a href="http://opendata.cern.ch/">CERN open data portal</a></li> <li><a href="https://home.cern/news/news/physics/particle-physicists-update-strategy-future-field-europe">Particle Physicists update the strategy for the future of the field in Europe</a></li> <li><a href="https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2008/0809016/0809016_01/0809016_01-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg">(Photo) Magnetic tape as a long-term data storage solution at the CERN data centre</a></li> <li><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2673004/files/201902-108_15.jpg?version=1">(Photo) The biggest experiments at CERN operate at the Large Hadron Collider</a></li> </ul></div> Fri, 11 Dec 2020 07:45:22 +0000 cagrigor 156215 at https://home.cern CERN experiments announce first indications of a rare Higgs boson process https://home.cern/news/press-release/physics/cern-experiments-announce-first-indications-rare-higgs-boson-process <span>CERN experiments announce first indications of a rare Higgs boson process</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/199" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abha</span></span> <span>Mon, 08/03/2020 - 14:22</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2725767" data-filename="dimuons" id="OPEN-PHO-EXP-2020-002-1"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/OPEN-PHO-EXP-2020-002-1" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Candidate event displays of Higgs boson decaying into two muons as recorded by CMS (left) and ATLAS (right)." src="//cds.cern.ch/images/OPEN-PHO-EXP-2020-002-1/file?size=large"/> </a> <figcaption> Candidate event displays of Higgs boson decaying into two muons as recorded by CMS (left) and ATLAS (right). <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Geneva. At the <a href="https://ichep2020.org/">40th ICHEP conference</a>, the <a href="http://atlas.cern/">ATLAS</a> and <a href="http://cms.cern/">CMS</a> experiments announced new results which show that the <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/higgs-boson">Higgs boson</a> decays into two muons. The muon is a heavier copy of the electron, one of the elementary particles that constitute the matter content of the Universe. While electrons are classified as a first-generation particle, muons belong to the second generation. The physics process of the Higgs boson decaying into muons is a rare phenomenon as only about one Higgs boson in 5000 decays into muons. These new results have pivotal importance for fundamental physics because they indicate for the first time that the Higgs boson interacts with second-generation elementary particles.</p> <p>Physicists at CERN have been studying the Higgs boson since its discovery in 2012 in order to probe the properties of this very special particle. The Higgs boson, produced from proton collisions at the <a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">Large Hadron Collider</a>, disintegrates – referred to as decay – almost instantaneously into other particles. One of the main methods of studying the Higgs boson’s properties is by analysing how it decays into the various fundamental particles and the rate of disintegration.</p> <p>CMS achieved evidence of this decay with 3 sigma, which means that the chance of seeing the Higgs boson decaying into a muon pair from statistical fluctuation is less than one in 700. ATLAS’s two-sigma result means the chances are one in 40. The combination of both results would increase the significance well above 3 sigma and provides strong evidence for the Higgs boson decay to two muons.</p> <p>“CMS is proud to have achieved this sensitivity to the decay of Higgs bosons to muons, and to show the first experimental evidence for this process. The Higgs boson seems to interact also with second-generation particles in agreement with the prediction of the Standard Model, a result that will be further refined with the data we expect to collect in the next run,” said Roberto Carlin, spokesperson for the CMS experiment.</p> <p>The Higgs boson is the quantum manifestation of the Higgs field, which gives mass to elementary particles it interacts with, via the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism. By measuring the rate at which the Higgs boson decays into different particles, physicists can infer the strength of their interaction with the Higgs field: the higher the rate of decay into a given particle, the stronger its interaction with the field. So far, the ATLAS and CMS experiments have observed the Higgs boson decays into different types of bosons such as <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/w-boson-sunshine-and-stardust">W</a> and <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/z-boson">Z</a>, and heavier fermions such as tau leptons. The interaction with the heaviest quarks, the top and bottom, was measured in 2018. Muons are much lighter in comparison and their interaction with the Higgs field is weaker. Interactions between the Higgs boson and muons had, therefore, not previously been seen at the LHC.</p> <p>“This evidence of Higgs boson decays to second-generation matter particles complements a highly successful Run 2 Higgs physics programme. The measurements of the Higgs boson’s properties have reached a new stage in precision and rare decay modes can be addressed. These achievements rely on the large LHC dataset, the outstanding efficiency and performance of the ATLAS detector and the use of novel analysis techniques,” said Karl Jakobs, ATLAS spokesperson.</p> <p>What makes these studies even more challenging is that, at the LHC, for every predicted Higgs boson decaying to two muons, there are thousands of muon pairs produced through other processes that mimic the expected experimental signature. The characteristic signature of the Higgs boson’s decay to muons is a small excess of events that cluster near a muon-pair mass of 125 GeV, which is the mass of the Higgs boson. Isolating the Higgs boson to muon-pair interactions is no easy feat. To do so, both experiments measure the energy, momentum and angles of muon candidates from the Higgs boson’s decay. In addition, the sensitivity of the analyses was improved through methods such as sophisticated background modelling strategies and other advanced techniques such as machine-learning algorithms. CMS combined four separate analyses, each optimised to categorise physics events with possible signals of a specific Higgs boson production mode. ATLAS divided their events into 20 categories that targeted specific Higgs boson production modes.</p> <p>The results, which are so far consistent with the <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/standard-model">Standard Model</a> predictions, used the full data set collected from the second run of the LHC. With more data to be recorded from the particle accelerator’s next run and with the High-Luminosity LHC, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations expect to reach the sensitivity (5 sigma) needed to establish the discovery of the Higgs boson decay to two muons and constrain possible theories of physics beyond the Standard Model that would affect this decay mode of the Higgs boson.</p> <p><br /><strong>LINKS</strong></p> <p>Scientific materials<br />  <br /> Papers:<br /> CMS physics analysis summary: <a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2725423">https://cds.cern.ch/record/2725423</a><br /> ATLAS paper on arXiv: <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.07830">https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.07830</a></p> <p>Physics briefings:<br /> CMS: <a href="https://cmsexperiment.web.cern.ch/news/cms-sees-evidence-higgs-boson-decaying-muons">https://cmsexperiment.web.cern.ch/news/cms-sees-evidence-higgs-boson-decaying-muons</a><br /> ATLAS: <a href="https://atlas.cern/updates/physics-briefing/new-search-rare-higgs-decays-muons">https://atlas.cern/updates/physics-briefing/new-search-rare-higgs-decays-muons</a></p> <p>Event displays and plots:<br /> CMS: <a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2720665?ln=en">https://cds.cern.ch/record/2720665?ln=en</a><br />  <a href="http://cds.cern.ch/record/2725728">http://cds.cern.ch/record/2725728</a><br /> ATLAS: <a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2725717?ln=en">https://cds.cern.ch/record/2725717?ln=en</a><br />  <a href="https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/PHYSICS/PAPERS/HIGG-2019-14">https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/PHYSICS/PAPERS/HIGG-2019-14</a></p> <p>Photos</p> <p>CMS detector:<br /><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/1344500/files/0712017_02.jpg?subformat=icon-1440">https://cds.cern.ch/record/1344500/files/0712017_02.jpg?subformat=icon-1440</a><br /><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/1431473/files/bul-pho-2007-079.jpg?subformat=icon-1440">https://cds.cern.ch/record/1431473/files/bul-pho-2007-079.jpg?subformat=icon-1440</a></p> <p>ATLAS detector: <a href="https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2007/0706038/0706038_02/0706038_02-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg">https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2007/0706038/0706038_02/0706038_02-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg</a><br /><a href="https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2007/0705021/0705021_01/0705021_01-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg">https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2007/0705021/0705021_01/0705021_01-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg</a></p> <p>CMS muon system:<br /><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2016944/files/IMG_0267.jpg?subformat=icon-1440">https://cds.cern.ch/record/2016944/files/IMG_0267.jpg?subformat=icon-1440</a><br /><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/1431505/files/DSC_1432.jpg?subformat=icon-1440">https://cds.cern.ch/record/1431505/files/DSC_1432.jpg?subformat=icon-1440</a></p> <p>ATLAS muon spectrometer:<br /><a href="https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2006/0610010/0610010_02/0610010_02-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg">https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2006/0610010/0610010_02/0610010_02-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg</a><br /><a href="https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2007/0707043/0707043_01/0707043_01-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg">https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2007/0707043/0707043_01/0707043_01-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg</a></p> </div> Mon, 03 Aug 2020 12:22:17 +0000 abha 155473 at https://home.cern Particle physicists update strategy for the future of the field in Europe https://home.cern/news/press-release/physics/particle-physicists-update-strategy-future-field-europe <span>Particle physicists update strategy for the future of the field in Europe</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/18835" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mailys</span></span> <span>Thu, 06/18/2020 - 15:49</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-listing-img field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/home.web.cern.ch/files/2020-06/EPPStrategyUpdate.jpg" width="3840" height="2160" alt="European Strategy for Particle Physics Update" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p> </p> <p>Geneva, 19 June 2020. Today, the CERN Council announced that it had unanimously updated the strategy intended to guide the future of particle physics in Europe within the global landscape (the document is available <a href="/sites/home.web.cern.ch/files/2020-06/2020%20Update%20European%20Strategy.pdf">here</a>). The updated recommendations highlight the scientific impact of particle physics and its technological, societal and human capital.</p> <p>The 2020 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics proposes a vision for both the near- and the long-term future of the field, which maintains Europe's leading role in particle physics and in the innovative technologies developed within the field.</p> <p>The highest-priority physics recommendations are the study of the Higgs boson and the exploration of the high-energy frontier: two crucial and complementary ways to address the open questions in particle physics.</p> <p>“The Strategy is above all driven by science and thus presents the scientific priorities for the field,” said Ursula Bassler, President of the CERN Council. “The European Strategy Group (ESG) – a special body set up by the Council – successfully led a strategic reflection to which several hundred European physicists contributed.” The scientific vision outlined in the Strategy should serve as a guideline to CERN and facilitate a coherent science policy across Europe.</p> <p>The successful completion of the High-Luminosity LHC in the coming years, for which upgrade work is currently in progress at CERN, should remain the focal point of European particle physics.</p> <p>The Strategy emphasises the importance of ramping up research and development (R&amp;D) for advanced accelerator, detector and computing technologies as a necessary prerequisite for all future projects. Delivering the near and long-term future research programme envisaged in this Strategy update requires both focused and transformational R&amp;D, which also has many potential benefits to society.</p> <p>The document also highlights the need to pursue an “electron-positron Higgs factory” as the highest-priority facility after the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Operation of this future collider at CERN could start within a timescale of less than 10 years after the full exploitation of the High-Luminosity LHC, which is expected to complete operations in 2038. The electron-positron collider would allow the properties of the Higgs boson to be measured with extremely high precision. The Higgs boson was discovered at CERN in 2012 by scientists working on the LHC, and is expected to be a powerful tool in the search for physics beyond the Standard Model.</p> <p>Another significant recommendation of the Strategy is that Europe, in collaboration with the worldwide community, should undertake a feasibility study for a next-generation hadron collider at the highest achievable energy, in preparation for the longer-term scientific goal of exploring the high-energy frontier, with an electron-positron collider as a possible first stage.</p> <p>It is further recommended that Europe continue to support neutrino projects in Japan and the US. Cooperation with neighbouring fields is also important, such as astroparticle and nuclear physics, as well as continued collaboration with non-European countries.</p> <p>“This is a very ambitious strategy, which outlines a bright future for Europe and for CERN with a prudent, step-wise approach. We will continue to invest in strong cooperative programmes between CERN and other research institutes in CERN’s Member States and beyond,” declared CERN Director-General Fabiola Gianotti. “These collaborations are key to sustained scientific and technological progress and bring many societal benefits.”</p> <p>“The natural next step is to explore the feasibility of the high-priority recommendations, while continuing to pursue a diverse programme of high-impact projects,” explains ESG Chair Halina Abramowicz. “Europe should keep the door open to participating in other headline projects that will serve the field as a whole, such as the proposed International Linear Collider project.”</p> <p>Beyond the immediate scientific return, major research infrastructures such as CERN have vast societal impact, thanks to their technological, economic and human capital. Advances in accelerators, detectors and computing have a significant impact on areas like medical and biomedical technologies, aerospace applications, cultural heritage, artificial intelligence, energy, big data and robotics. Partnerships with large research infrastructures help drive innovation in industry.</p> <p>In terms of human capital, the training of early-career scientists, engineers, technicians and professionals from diverse backgrounds is an essential part of high-energy physics programmes, which provide a talent pool for industry and other fields.</p> <p>The Strategy also highlights two other essential aspects: the environment and the importance of Open Science. “The environmental impact of particle physics activities should continue to be carefully studied and minimised. A detailed plan for the minimisation of environmental impact and for the saving and reuse of energy should be part of the approval process for any major project,” says the report. The technologies developed in particle physics to minimise the environmental impact of future facilities may also find more general applications in environmental protection.</p> <p>The update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics announced today got under way in September 2018 when the CERN Council, comprising representatives from CERN’s Member and Associate Member States, established a European Strategy Group (ESG) to coordinate the process. The ESG worked in close consultation with the scientific community. Nearly two hundred submissions were discussed during an Open Symposium in Granada in May 2019 and distilled into the Physics Briefing Book, a scientific summary of the community’s input, prepared by the Physics Preparatory Group. The ESG converged on the final recommendations during a week-long drafting session held in Germany in January 2020. The group’s findings were presented to the CERN Council in March and were scheduled to be announced on 25 May, in Budapest. This was delayed due to the global Covid-19 situation but they have now been made publicly available<em>.</em></p> </div> Thu, 18 Jun 2020 13:49:28 +0000 mailys 155055 at https://home.cern Estonia to become Associate Member in the Pre-Stage to Membership of CERN https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/estonia-become-associate-member-pre-stage-membership-cern <span>Estonia to become Associate Member in the Pre-Stage to Membership of CERN</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/147" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cagrigor</span></span> <span>Thu, 06/18/2020 - 15:15</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2721221" data-filename="202006-088_%209" id="CERN-PHOTO-202006-088-6"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202006-088-6" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Remote Signature of the Agreement concerning the granting of the status of Associate Member in the pre-stage to Membership of CERNof the Republic of Estonia byHis Excellency Mr Jüri RatasPrime MinisterRepublic of EstoniaFriday, 19June 2020" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202006-088-6/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Remote Signature of the Agreement concerning the granting of the status of Associate Member in the pre-stage to Membership of CERNof the Republic of Estonia byHis Excellency Mr Jüri RatasPrime MinisterRepublic of EstoniaFriday, 19June 2020 <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Geneva, 19 June 2020. Today, the representatives of CERN and of the Government of Estonia signed an Agreement admitting Estonia as an Associate Member in the Pre-Stage to Membership of CERN. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the signing ceremony took place via a live feed between Geneva and Tallinn, a first in the 66-year history of CERN. The Agreement will enter into force once CERN has been informed by the Estonian authorities that all the necessary approval processes have been finalised.</p> <p>“We are very pleased to welcome Estonia as a new Associate Member State in the Pre-Stage to Membership. Over the years, Estonian scientists have contributed significantly to CERN’s scientific activities and have actively participated in CERN’s educational programmes” said Fabiola Gianotti, CERN Director-General. “With Estonia becoming an Associate Member, Estonia and CERN will have the opportunity to expand their collaboration in, and increase their mutual benefit from, scientific and technological development as well as education and training activities. We are looking forward to strengthening our ties further.”</p> <p>“Mutually beneficial cooperation with CERN is important for Estonia. Becoming an associate member is the next big step for Estonia to deepen its co-operation with CERN before becoming a full member. As an associate member, many important opportunities open up for Estonian entrepreneurs, scientists and researchers to work together on innovation and R&amp;D, which will greatly benefit Estonia’s business sector and the economy as a whole and, vice versa, we can also share our experiences and I am convinced that CERN will become a valued partner for Estonia and Estonia a valued partner for CERN,” said Jüri Ratas, Estonia’s Prime Minister, at the signing ceremony.</p> <p>Estonia’s co-operation with CERN was established in 1996. After joining the <a href="http://public.web.cern.ch/public/en/LHC/CMS-en.html">CMS</a> experiment at the Large Hadron Collider – CERN’s flagship accelerator – in 1997, Estonia became an active member of the CERN community. Between 2004 and 2016, new collaboration frameworks gradually boosted scientific and technical co-operation between Estonia and CERN and further strengthened the participation of the Estonian particle physics community in the high-energy physics experiments at CERN. In September 2018 Estonia applied for CERN Membership.</p> <p>Today, Estonia is represented by 25 scientists at CERN, namely an active group of theorists, researchers involved in R&amp;D for the <a href="http://clic-study.web.cern.ch/">CLIC</a> project and a CMS team involved in data analysis and the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (<a href="https://home.cern/science/computing/worldwide-lhc-computing-grid">WLCG</a>), with Estonia operating one of the Tier-2 centres in Tallinn; another team is taking part in the <a href="http://public.web.cern.ch/public/en/LHC/TOTEM-en.html">TOTEM</a> experiment. All these scientists represent the following institutes: the Estonian National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, the University of Tartu and its Institute of Physics, the Technical University of Tallinn (TalTech) and the Observatory of Tartu.</p> <p>Estonia also benefits from CERN’s educational activities through the regular participation of its students and high-school teachers in the Summer Student and High-School Teacher programmes.</p> <p>CERN’s Associate Member States are entitled to participate in the meetings of the CERN Council, Finance Committee and Scientific Policy Committee. Their nationals are eligible for limited-duration staff positions and fellowships and their industry is entitled to bid for CERN contracts, increasing opportunities for industrial collaboration in advanced technologies.</p> <p><strong>Footnote(s)</strong></p> <p>1. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is one of the world's leading laboratories for particle physics. The Organization is located on the French-Swiss border, with its headquarters in Geneva. Its Member States are: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom. Cyprus and Slovenia are Associate Member States in the pre-stage to Membership. Croatia, India, Lithuania, Pakistan, Turkey and Ukraine are Associate Member States. The European Union, Japan, JINR, the Russian Federation, UNESCO and the United States of America currently have Observer status.</p></div> Thu, 18 Jun 2020 13:15:58 +0000 cagrigor 155054 at https://home.cern High-school teams from Switzerland and Germany win CERN Beamline for Schools competition https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/high-school-teams-switzerland-and-germany-win-cern-beamline-schools <span>High-school teams from Switzerland and Germany win CERN Beamline for Schools competition</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/18835" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mailys</span></span> <span>Mon, 06/15/2020 - 10:33</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-listing-img field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/home.web.cern.ch/files/2020-06/bl4s2.jpg" width="1219" height="1082" alt="CERN Beamline for Schools 2020 winners" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-caption field--type-string-long field--label-hidden field--item">Winners of the CERN Beamline for Schools 2020: Team ChDR Cheese (above) from the Werner-von-Siemens-Gymnasium in Berlin, Germany, and Team Nations&#039; Flying Foxes (below) from the International School of Geneva, Switzerland.</div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Geneva and Hamburg, 15 June 2020. Two teams of high-school students, one from the <a href="https://www.ecolint.ch/campus/campus-des-nations">International School of Geneva, Campus des Nations</a>, Switzerland, and one from the <a href="https://www.siemens-gymnasium-berlin.de/">Werner-von-Siemens-Gymnasium</a> in Berlin, Germany, have won the 2020 <a href="http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch/">Beamline for Schools competition</a> (BL4S). Later this year, the winning teams will be invited to the <a href="http://www.desy.de/index_eng.html">DESY</a> research centre in Hamburg, Germany, for the opportunity to carry out their proposed experiments together with scientists from CERN and DESY.</p> <p>Beamline for Schools, an international competition open to high-school students from across the world, invites submission of proposals for an experiment that uses a beamline. Beamlines deliver a stream of subatomic particles to any given set-up, making it possible to study a broad variety of properties and processes in various scientific disciplines. They are operated at laboratories such as CERN and DESY. Due to the second Long Shutdown of CERN’s accelerators for maintenance and upgrade, there is currently no beam at CERN, which has opened up opportunities for partnerships with laboratories such as DESY during this period.</p> <p>"DESY is very pleased to welcome the BL4S competition for the second time," says Helmut Dosch, Chairman of the DESY Board of Directors. "The preparations must have been even more challenging for the students this year, but the high number of participants proves how popular this competition is. We are looking forward to meeting the next generation of scientists in autumn.”</p> <p>Since Beamline for Schools was launched in 2014, more than 11,000 students from 91 countries have participated. This year, 198 teams from 49 countries worldwide submitted a proposal for the competition’s seventh edition. From the entries received, 23 teams from 17 different countries (Argentina, Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, China, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United Sates) were shortlisted. Each shortlisted team will receive BL4S t-shirts and a Cosmic Pi detector. Ten teams from Australia, Brazil, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, United States, were selected for Special Mention and will also receive BL4S t-shirts.</p> <p>“We look forward to welcoming this year’s winners to DESY. With the difficult situation worldwide, we are particularly grateful for and overwhelmed by the record number of entries. Students across the globe organised themselves via videoconferences and teamed up even across countries – an undoubtedly extraordinary and experience-rich situation for everyone,” said Sarah Aretz, BL4S project manager.</p> <p>The two winning teams of 2020 have proposed two very different experiments. This illustrates the wide spectrum of research questions that are possible within the boundary conditions of BL4S. The team Nations' Flying Foxes from Switzerland wants to detect a particle known as Δ+ Baryon. When high energy electrons interact with protons, these protons can be converted into the Δ+ particle. As the particle has a very short lifetime, the team will have to look for indirect signatures pretty much in the same way as short-lived particles are detected in the large experiments at CERN and DESY.</p> <p>“From the first brainstorming session for ideas two years ago, to finally going to DESY in a few months – this has been an amazing journey. What an incredible moment! This will truly shape our academic careers well into the future,” said Mikhail Slepovskiy from the Nations’ Flying Foxes team.</p> <p>The team ChDR Cheese from Germany wants to use a physics effect known as Cherenkov Diffraction Radiation (ChDR) as the basis of an innovative technology for the diagnosis of particle beams in accelerators. When particles move along certain materials such as fused silica, photons can be created while the particle beam itself is not disturbed. The properties of these photons, however, provide information about the beam that is valuable for the accelerator control system.</p> <p>“Hearing that we had won baffled all of us. It was like a dream come true. We are tremendously grateful to DESY and CERN for giving us this incredible opportunity and cheering us up in such trying times,” said Tobias Baumgartner from the ChDR Cheese team.</p> <p>Beamline for Schools is an Education and Outreach project funded by the <a href="https://cernandsocietyfoundation.cern/">CERN &amp; Society Foundation</a> and supported by individual donors, foundations and companies. For 2020, the competition is partly supported by the Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Foundation with additional contributions from the Arconic Foundation as well as from the Ernest Solvay Fund, managed by the King Baudouin Foundation.</p> <p><strong>Further information:</strong></p> <ul><li>BL4S website: <a href="http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch">http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch</a></li> <li>2020 edition: <a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/editions/2020-edition">https://beamlinefor schools.cern/ editions/2020-edition</a></li> <li>Shortlisted and special mention teams 2020: <a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/bl4s-shortlisted-and-special-mention-teams-2020">https://beamlineforschools.cern/bl4s-shortlisted-and-special-mention-teams-2020</a></li> <li>Previous winners: <a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/bl4s-competition/winners">https://beamline forschools. cern/bl4s-competition/winners</a></li> </ul><p><strong>About CERN</strong></p> <p>CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is one of the world's leading laboratories for particle physics. The Organization is located on the French-Swiss border, with its headquarters in Geneva. Its Member States are: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Cyprus and Slovenia are Associate Member States in the pre-stage to Membership. Croatia, India, Lithuania, Pakistan, Turkey and Ukraine are Associate Member States. The European Union, Japan, JINR, the Russian Federation, UNESCO and the United States of America currently have Observer status.</p> <p><strong>About the CERN &amp; Society Foundation:</strong></p> <p>The CERN &amp; Society Foundation is a charitable foundation established by CERN to fund a programme of projects. These projects, in the areas of education and outreach, innovation and knowledge exchange, and culture and creativity, are inspired or enabled by CERN, but lie outside of its specific research mandate. The Foundation seeks the support of individuals, trusts, international organizations and commercial entities to help make these projects happen, and spread the CERN spirit of scientific curiosity for the inspiration and benefit of society.</p> <p><strong>About DESY</strong></p> <p>DESY is one of the world’s leading particle accelerator centres. Researchers use the large‐scale facilities at DESY to explore the microcosm in all its variety – ranging from the interaction of tiny elementary particles to the behaviour of innovative nanomaterials, the vital processes that take place between biomolecules and the great mysteries of the universe. The accelerators and detectors that DESY develops and builds at its locations in Hamburg and Zeuthen are unique research tools. DESY is a member of the Helmholtz Association, and receives its funding from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) (90 per cent) and the German federal states of Hamburg and Brandenburg (10 per cent).</p> </div> Mon, 15 Jun 2020 08:33:38 +0000 mailys 155039 at https://home.cern CERN Council appoints Fabiola Gianotti for second term of office as CERN Director General https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/cern-council-appoints-fabiola-gianotti-second-term-office-cern-director <span>CERN Council appoints Fabiola Gianotti for second term of office as CERN Director General</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/145" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">melissa</span></span> <span>Wed, 11/06/2019 - 12:28</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2704198" data-filename="201912-419_02" id="CERN-PHOTO-201912-419-2"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201912-419-2" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Signature - Letter of appointment" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201912-419-2/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Signature of the letter of appointment by Fabiola Gianotti in company of Ursula Bassler, President of the CERN Council <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><em><strong>UPDATE</strong> on 13 December 2019: At its 196th Session, on 12 December, the CERN Council unanimously decided to appoint Fabiola Gianotti as Director-General of CERN for a second term of office of five years, with effect from 1 January 2021.</em></p> <hr /><p>Geneva, 6 November 2019. At its 195th Session today, the <a href="http://council.web.cern.ch/en">CERN Council</a> selected Fabiola Gianotti, as the Organization’s next Director-General, for her second term of office. The appointment will be formalised at the December Session of the Council, and Gianotti’s new five-year term of office will begin on 1 January 2021. This is the first time in CERN’s history that a Director-General has been appointed for a full second term.</p> <p>"I congratulate Fabiola Gianotti very warmly for her reappointment as Director-General for another five-year term of office. With her at the helm, CERN will continue to benefit from her strong leadership and experience, especially for important upcoming projects such as the <a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/high-luminosity-lhc">High-Luminosity LHC</a>, implementation of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, and the construction of the Science Gateway,” said President of the CERN Council, Ursula Bassler.  “During her first term, she excelled in leading our diverse and international scientific organisation, becoming a role model, especially for women in science”.</p> <p>"I am deeply grateful to the CERN Council for their renewed trust. It is a great privilege and a huge responsibility,” said CERN Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti. “The following years will be crucial for laying the foundations of CERN’s future projects and I am honoured to have the opportunity to work with the CERN Member States, Associate Member States, other international partners and the worldwide particle physics community.”</p> <p>Gianotti has been CERN’s Director-General since 1 January 2016. She received her Ph.D. in experimental particle physics from the University of Milano in 1989 and has been a research physicist at CERN since 1994. She was the leader of the ATLAS experiment’s collaboration from March 2009 to February 2013, including the period in which the LHC experiments ATLAS and CMS announced the discovery of the <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/higgs-boson">Higgs boson</a>. The discovery was recognised in 2013 with the Nobel Prize in Physics being awarded to theorists François Englert and Peter Higgs. Gianotti is a member of many international committees, and has received numerous prestigious awards. She was the first woman to become the Director-General of CERN.</p> <p><br /><strong>FOR MORE INFORMATION</strong></p> <p>A Press Briefing will be held at CERN this afternoon at 18:00, with Dr. Gianotti and the President of the CERN Council, Ursula Bassler. The Press Briefing will also be available via video conference. Journalists interested in participating are invited to register by sending an email to <a href="mailto:press@cern.ch">press@cern.ch</a></p> <p><a class="bulletin" href="https://home.cern/about/who-we-are/our-people/biographies/fabiola-gianotti-born-1960-italian">Fabiola Gianotti's biography</a></p> <p>More photos <a class="bulletin" href="http://cds.cern.ch/record/2699004?ln=en">here</a> and <a class="bulletin" href="http://cds.cern.ch/record/2116824?ln=en">here</a></p> </div> Wed, 06 Nov 2019 11:28:50 +0000 melissa 13337 at https://home.cern