CERN: Press release https://home.cern/ en CERN experiments announce first indications of a rare Higgs boson process https://home.cern/news/press-release/physics/cern-experiments-announce-first-indications-rare-higgs-boson-process <span>CERN experiments announce first indications of a rare Higgs boson process</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/199" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abha</span></span> <span>Mon, 08/03/2020 - 14:22</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2725767" data-filename="dimuons" id="OPEN-PHO-EXP-2020-002-1"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/OPEN-PHO-EXP-2020-002-1" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Candidate event displays of Higgs boson decaying into two muons as recorded by CMS (left) and ATLAS (right)." src="//cds.cern.ch/images/OPEN-PHO-EXP-2020-002-1/file?size=large"/> </a> <figcaption> Candidate event displays of Higgs boson decaying into two muons as recorded by CMS (left) and ATLAS (right). <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Geneva. At the <a href="https://ichep2020.org/">40th ICHEP conference</a>, the <a href="http://atlas.cern/">ATLAS</a> and <a href="http://cms.cern/">CMS</a> experiments announced new results which show that the <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/higgs-boson">Higgs boson</a> decays into two muons. The muon is a heavier copy of the electron, one of the elementary particles that constitute the matter content of the Universe. While electrons are classified as a first-generation particle, muons belong to the second generation. The physics process of the Higgs boson decaying into muons is a rare phenomenon as only about one Higgs boson in 5000 decays into muons. These new results have pivotal importance for fundamental physics because they indicate for the first time that the Higgs boson interacts with second-generation elementary particles.</p> <p>Physicists at CERN have been studying the Higgs boson since its discovery in 2012 in order to probe the properties of this very special particle. The Higgs boson, produced from proton collisions at the <a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">Large Hadron Collider</a>, disintegrates – referred to as decay – almost instantaneously into other particles. One of the main methods of studying the Higgs boson’s properties is by analysing how it decays into the various fundamental particles and the rate of disintegration.</p> <p>CMS achieved evidence of this decay with 3 sigma, which means that the chance of seeing the Higgs boson decaying into a muon pair from statistical fluctuation is less than one in 700. ATLAS’s two-sigma result means the chances are one in 40. The combination of both results would increase the significance well above 3 sigma and provides strong evidence for the Higgs boson decay to two muons.</p> <p>“CMS is proud to have achieved this sensitivity to the decay of Higgs bosons to muons, and to show the first experimental evidence for this process. The Higgs boson seems to interact also with second-generation particles in agreement with the prediction of the Standard Model, a result that will be further refined with the data we expect to collect in the next run,” said Roberto Carlin, spokesperson for the CMS experiment.</p> <p>The Higgs boson is the quantum manifestation of the Higgs field, which gives mass to elementary particles it interacts with, via the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism. By measuring the rate at which the Higgs boson decays into different particles, physicists can infer the strength of their interaction with the Higgs field: the higher the rate of decay into a given particle, the stronger its interaction with the field. So far, the ATLAS and CMS experiments have observed the Higgs boson decays into different types of bosons such as <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/w-boson-sunshine-and-stardust">W</a> and <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/z-boson">Z</a>, and heavier fermions such as tau leptons. The interaction with the heaviest quarks, the top and bottom, was measured in 2018. Muons are much lighter in comparison and their interaction with the Higgs field is weaker. Interactions between the Higgs boson and muons had, therefore, not previously been seen at the LHC.</p> <p>“This evidence of Higgs boson decays to second-generation matter particles complements a highly successful Run 2 Higgs physics programme. The measurements of the Higgs boson’s properties have reached a new stage in precision and rare decay modes can be addressed. These achievements rely on the large LHC dataset, the outstanding efficiency and performance of the ATLAS detector and the use of novel analysis techniques,” said Karl Jakobs, ATLAS spokesperson.</p> <p>What makes these studies even more challenging is that, at the LHC, for every predicted Higgs boson decaying to two muons, there are thousands of muon pairs produced through other processes that mimic the expected experimental signature. The characteristic signature of the Higgs boson’s decay to muons is a small excess of events that cluster near a muon-pair mass of 125 GeV, which is the mass of the Higgs boson. Isolating the Higgs boson to muon-pair interactions is no easy feat. To do so, both experiments measure the energy, momentum and angles of muon candidates from the Higgs boson’s decay. In addition, the sensitivity of the analyses was improved through methods such as sophisticated background modelling strategies and other advanced techniques such as machine-learning algorithms. CMS combined four separate analyses, each optimised to categorise physics events with possible signals of a specific Higgs boson production mode. ATLAS divided their events into 20 categories that targeted specific Higgs boson production modes.</p> <p>The results, which are so far consistent with the <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/standard-model">Standard Model</a> predictions, used the full data set collected from the second run of the LHC. With more data to be recorded from the particle accelerator’s next run and with the High-Luminosity LHC, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations expect to reach the sensitivity (5 sigma) needed to establish the discovery of the Higgs boson decay to two muons and constrain possible theories of physics beyond the Standard Model that would affect this decay mode of the Higgs boson.</p> <p><br /><strong>LINKS</strong></p> <p>Scientific materials<br />  <br /> Papers:<br /> CMS physics analysis summary: <a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2725423">https://cds.cern.ch/record/2725423</a><br /> ATLAS paper on arXiv: <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.07830">https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.07830</a></p> <p>Physics briefings:<br /> CMS: <a href="https://cmsexperiment.web.cern.ch/news/cms-sees-evidence-higgs-boson-decaying-muons">https://cmsexperiment.web.cern.ch/news/cms-sees-evidence-higgs-boson-decaying-muons</a><br /> ATLAS: <a href="https://atlas.cern/updates/physics-briefing/new-search-rare-higgs-decays-muons">https://atlas.cern/updates/physics-briefing/new-search-rare-higgs-decays-muons</a></p> <p>Event displays and plots:<br /> CMS: <a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2720665?ln=en">https://cds.cern.ch/record/2720665?ln=en</a><br />  <a href="http://cds.cern.ch/record/2725728">http://cds.cern.ch/record/2725728</a><br /> ATLAS: <a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2725717?ln=en">https://cds.cern.ch/record/2725717?ln=en</a><br />  <a href="https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/PHYSICS/PAPERS/HIGG-2019-14">https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/PHYSICS/PAPERS/HIGG-2019-14</a></p> <p>Photos</p> <p>CMS detector:<br /><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/1344500/files/0712017_02.jpg?subformat=icon-1440">https://cds.cern.ch/record/1344500/files/0712017_02.jpg?subformat=icon-1440</a><br /><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/1431473/files/bul-pho-2007-079.jpg?subformat=icon-1440">https://cds.cern.ch/record/1431473/files/bul-pho-2007-079.jpg?subformat=icon-1440</a></p> <p>ATLAS detector: <a href="https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2007/0706038/0706038_02/0706038_02-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg">https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2007/0706038/0706038_02/0706038_02-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg</a><br /><a href="https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2007/0705021/0705021_01/0705021_01-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg">https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2007/0705021/0705021_01/0705021_01-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg</a></p> <p>CMS muon system:<br /><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2016944/files/IMG_0267.jpg?subformat=icon-1440">https://cds.cern.ch/record/2016944/files/IMG_0267.jpg?subformat=icon-1440</a><br /><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/1431505/files/DSC_1432.jpg?subformat=icon-1440">https://cds.cern.ch/record/1431505/files/DSC_1432.jpg?subformat=icon-1440</a></p> <p>ATLAS muon spectrometer:<br /><a href="https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2006/0610010/0610010_02/0610010_02-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg">https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2006/0610010/0610010_02/0610010_02-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg</a><br /><a href="https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2007/0707043/0707043_01/0707043_01-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg">https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Photo/Public/2007/0707043/0707043_01/0707043_01-A4-at-144-dpi.jpg</a></p> </div> Mon, 03 Aug 2020 12:22:17 +0000 abha 155473 at https://home.cern Particle physicists update strategy for the future of the field in Europe https://home.cern/news/press-release/physics/particle-physicists-update-strategy-future-field-europe <span>Particle physicists update strategy for the future of the field in Europe</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/18835" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mailys</span></span> <span>Thu, 06/18/2020 - 15:49</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-listing-img field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/home.web.cern.ch/files/2020-06/EPPStrategyUpdate.jpg" width="3840" height="2160" alt="European Strategy for Particle Physics Update" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p> </p> <p>Geneva, 19 June 2020. Today, the CERN Council announced that it had unanimously updated the strategy intended to guide the future of particle physics in Europe within the global landscape (the document is available <a href="/sites/home.web.cern.ch/files/2020-06/2020%20Update%20European%20Strategy.pdf">here</a>). The updated recommendations highlight the scientific impact of particle physics and its technological, societal and human capital.</p> <p>The 2020 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics proposes a vision for both the near- and the long-term future of the field, which maintains Europe's leading role in particle physics and in the innovative technologies developed within the field.</p> <p>The highest-priority physics recommendations are the study of the Higgs boson and the exploration of the high-energy frontier: two crucial and complementary ways to address the open questions in particle physics.</p> <p>“The Strategy is above all driven by science and thus presents the scientific priorities for the field,” said Ursula Bassler, President of the CERN Council. “The European Strategy Group (ESG) – a special body set up by the Council – successfully led a strategic reflection to which several hundred European physicists contributed.” The scientific vision outlined in the Strategy should serve as a guideline to CERN and facilitate a coherent science policy across Europe.</p> <p>The successful completion of the High-Luminosity LHC in the coming years, for which upgrade work is currently in progress at CERN, should remain the focal point of European particle physics.</p> <p>The Strategy emphasises the importance of ramping up research and development (R&amp;D) for advanced accelerator, detector and computing technologies as a necessary prerequisite for all future projects. Delivering the near and long-term future research programme envisaged in this Strategy update requires both focused and transformational R&amp;D, which also has many potential benefits to society.</p> <p>The document also highlights the need to pursue an “electron-positron Higgs factory” as the highest-priority facility after the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Operation of this future collider at CERN could start within a timescale of less than 10 years after the full exploitation of the High-Luminosity LHC, which is expected to complete operations in 2038. The electron-positron collider would allow the properties of the Higgs boson to be measured with extremely high precision. The Higgs boson was discovered at CERN in 2012 by scientists working on the LHC, and is expected to be a powerful tool in the search for physics beyond the Standard Model.</p> <p>Another significant recommendation of the Strategy is that Europe, in collaboration with the worldwide community, should undertake a feasibility study for a next-generation hadron collider at the highest achievable energy, in preparation for the longer-term scientific goal of exploring the high-energy frontier, with an electron-positron collider as a possible first stage.</p> <p>It is further recommended that Europe continue to support neutrino projects in Japan and the US. Cooperation with neighbouring fields is also important, such as astroparticle and nuclear physics, as well as continued collaboration with non-European countries.</p> <p>“This is a very ambitious strategy, which outlines a bright future for Europe and for CERN with a prudent, step-wise approach. We will continue to invest in strong cooperative programmes between CERN and other research institutes in CERN’s Member States and beyond,” declared CERN Director-General Fabiola Gianotti. “These collaborations are key to sustained scientific and technological progress and bring many societal benefits.”</p> <p>“The natural next step is to explore the feasibility of the high-priority recommendations, while continuing to pursue a diverse programme of high-impact projects,” explains ESG Chair Halina Abramowicz. “Europe should keep the door open to participating in other headline projects that will serve the field as a whole, such as the proposed International Linear Collider project.”</p> <p>Beyond the immediate scientific return, major research infrastructures such as CERN have vast societal impact, thanks to their technological, economic and human capital. Advances in accelerators, detectors and computing have a significant impact on areas like medical and biomedical technologies, aerospace applications, cultural heritage, artificial intelligence, energy, big data and robotics. Partnerships with large research infrastructures help drive innovation in industry.</p> <p>In terms of human capital, the training of early-career scientists, engineers, technicians and professionals from diverse backgrounds is an essential part of high-energy physics programmes, which provide a talent pool for industry and other fields.</p> <p>The Strategy also highlights two other essential aspects: the environment and the importance of Open Science. “The environmental impact of particle physics activities should continue to be carefully studied and minimised. A detailed plan for the minimisation of environmental impact and for the saving and reuse of energy should be part of the approval process for any major project,” says the report. The technologies developed in particle physics to minimise the environmental impact of future facilities may also find more general applications in environmental protection.</p> <p>The update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics announced today got under way in September 2018 when the CERN Council, comprising representatives from CERN’s Member and Associate Member States, established a European Strategy Group (ESG) to coordinate the process. The ESG worked in close consultation with the scientific community. Nearly two hundred submissions were discussed during an Open Symposium in Granada in May 2019 and distilled into the Physics Briefing Book, a scientific summary of the community’s input, prepared by the Physics Preparatory Group. The ESG converged on the final recommendations during a week-long drafting session held in Germany in January 2020. The group’s findings were presented to the CERN Council in March and were scheduled to be announced on 25 May, in Budapest. This was delayed due to the global Covid-19 situation but they have now been made publicly available<em>.</em></p> </div> Thu, 18 Jun 2020 13:49:28 +0000 mailys 155055 at https://home.cern Estonia to become Associate Member in the Pre-Stage to Membership of CERN https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/estonia-become-associate-member-pre-stage-membership-cern <span>Estonia to become Associate Member in the Pre-Stage to Membership of CERN</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/147" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cagrigor</span></span> <span>Thu, 06/18/2020 - 15:15</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2721221" data-filename="202006-088_%209" id="CERN-PHOTO-202006-088-6"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202006-088-6" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Remote Signature of the Agreement concerning the granting of the status of Associate Member in the pre-stage to Membership of CERNof the Republic of Estonia byHis Excellency Mr Jüri RatasPrime MinisterRepublic of EstoniaFriday, 19June 2020" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202006-088-6/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Remote Signature of the Agreement concerning the granting of the status of Associate Member in the pre-stage to Membership of CERNof the Republic of Estonia byHis Excellency Mr Jüri RatasPrime MinisterRepublic of EstoniaFriday, 19June 2020 <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Geneva, 19 June 2020. Today, the representatives of CERN and of the Government of Estonia signed an Agreement admitting Estonia as an Associate Member in the Pre-Stage to Membership of CERN. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the signing ceremony took place via a live feed between Geneva and Tallinn, a first in the 66-year history of CERN. The Agreement will enter into force once CERN has been informed by the Estonian authorities that all the necessary approval processes have been finalised.</p> <p>“We are very pleased to welcome Estonia as a new Associate Member State in the Pre-Stage to Membership. Over the years, Estonian scientists have contributed significantly to CERN’s scientific activities and have actively participated in CERN’s educational programmes” said Fabiola Gianotti, CERN Director-General. “With Estonia becoming an Associate Member, Estonia and CERN will have the opportunity to expand their collaboration in, and increase their mutual benefit from, scientific and technological development as well as education and training activities. We are looking forward to strengthening our ties further.”</p> <p>“Mutually beneficial cooperation with CERN is important for Estonia. Becoming an associate member is the next big step for Estonia to deepen its co-operation with CERN before becoming a full member. As an associate member, many important opportunities open up for Estonian entrepreneurs, scientists and researchers to work together on innovation and R&amp;D, which will greatly benefit Estonia’s business sector and the economy as a whole and, vice versa, we can also share our experiences and I am convinced that CERN will become a valued partner for Estonia and Estonia a valued partner for CERN,” said Jüri Ratas, Estonia’s Prime Minister, at the signing ceremony.</p> <p>Estonia’s co-operation with CERN was established in 1996. After joining the <a href="http://public.web.cern.ch/public/en/LHC/CMS-en.html">CMS</a> experiment at the Large Hadron Collider – CERN’s flagship accelerator – in 1997, Estonia became an active member of the CERN community. Between 2004 and 2016, new collaboration frameworks gradually boosted scientific and technical co-operation between Estonia and CERN and further strengthened the participation of the Estonian particle physics community in the high-energy physics experiments at CERN. In September 2018 Estonia applied for CERN Membership.</p> <p>Today, Estonia is represented by 25 scientists at CERN, namely an active group of theorists, researchers involved in R&amp;D for the <a href="http://clic-study.web.cern.ch/">CLIC</a> project and a CMS team involved in data analysis and the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (<a href="https://home.cern/science/computing/worldwide-lhc-computing-grid">WLCG</a>), with Estonia operating one of the Tier-2 centres in Tallinn; another team is taking part in the <a href="http://public.web.cern.ch/public/en/LHC/TOTEM-en.html">TOTEM</a> experiment. All these scientists represent the following institutes: the Estonian National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, the University of Tartu and its Institute of Physics, the Technical University of Tallinn (TalTech) and the Observatory of Tartu.</p> <p>Estonia also benefits from CERN’s educational activities through the regular participation of its students and high-school teachers in the Summer Student and High-School Teacher programmes.</p> <p>CERN’s Associate Member States are entitled to participate in the meetings of the CERN Council, Finance Committee and Scientific Policy Committee. Their nationals are eligible for limited-duration staff positions and fellowships and their industry is entitled to bid for CERN contracts, increasing opportunities for industrial collaboration in advanced technologies.</p> <p><strong>Footnote(s)</strong></p> <p>1. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is one of the world's leading laboratories for particle physics. The Organization is located on the French-Swiss border, with its headquarters in Geneva. Its Member States are: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom. Cyprus and Slovenia are Associate Member States in the pre-stage to Membership. Croatia, India, Lithuania, Pakistan, Turkey and Ukraine are Associate Member States. The European Union, Japan, JINR, the Russian Federation, UNESCO and the United States of America currently have Observer status.</p></div> Thu, 18 Jun 2020 13:15:58 +0000 cagrigor 155054 at https://home.cern High-school teams from Switzerland and Germany win CERN Beamline for Schools competition https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/high-school-teams-switzerland-and-germany-win-cern-beamline-schools <span>High-school teams from Switzerland and Germany win CERN Beamline for Schools competition</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/18835" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">mailys</span></span> <span>Mon, 06/15/2020 - 10:33</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-listing-img field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/home.web.cern.ch/files/2020-06/bl4s2.jpg" width="1219" height="1082" alt="CERN Beamline for Schools 2020 winners" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-caption field--type-string-long field--label-hidden field--item">Winners of the CERN Beamline for Schools 2020: Team ChDR Cheese (above) from the Werner-von-Siemens-Gymnasium in Berlin, Germany, and Team Nations&#039; Flying Foxes (below) from the International School of Geneva, Switzerland.</div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Geneva and Hamburg, 15 June 2020. Two teams of high-school students, one from the <a href="https://www.ecolint.ch/campus/campus-des-nations">International School of Geneva, Campus des Nations</a>, Switzerland, and one from the <a href="https://www.siemens-gymnasium-berlin.de/">Werner-von-Siemens-Gymnasium</a> in Berlin, Germany, have won the 2020 <a href="http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch/">Beamline for Schools competition</a> (BL4S). Later this year, the winning teams will be invited to the <a href="http://www.desy.de/index_eng.html">DESY</a> research centre in Hamburg, Germany, for the opportunity to carry out their proposed experiments together with scientists from CERN and DESY.</p> <p>Beamline for Schools, an international competition open to high-school students from across the world, invites submission of proposals for an experiment that uses a beamline. Beamlines deliver a stream of subatomic particles to any given set-up, making it possible to study a broad variety of properties and processes in various scientific disciplines. They are operated at laboratories such as CERN and DESY. Due to the second Long Shutdown of CERN’s accelerators for maintenance and upgrade, there is currently no beam at CERN, which has opened up opportunities for partnerships with laboratories such as DESY during this period.</p> <p>"DESY is very pleased to welcome the BL4S competition for the second time," says Helmut Dosch, Chairman of the DESY Board of Directors. "The preparations must have been even more challenging for the students this year, but the high number of participants proves how popular this competition is. We are looking forward to meeting the next generation of scientists in autumn.”</p> <p>Since Beamline for Schools was launched in 2014, more than 11,000 students from 91 countries have participated. This year, 198 teams from 49 countries worldwide submitted a proposal for the competition’s seventh edition. From the entries received, 23 teams from 17 different countries (Argentina, Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, China, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United Sates) were shortlisted. Each shortlisted team will receive BL4S t-shirts and a Cosmic Pi detector. Ten teams from Australia, Brazil, India, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Russia, Turkey, United States, were selected for Special Mention and will also receive BL4S t-shirts.</p> <p>“We look forward to welcoming this year’s winners to DESY. With the difficult situation worldwide, we are particularly grateful for and overwhelmed by the record number of entries. Students across the globe organised themselves via videoconferences and teamed up even across countries – an undoubtedly extraordinary and experience-rich situation for everyone,” said Sarah Aretz, BL4S project manager.</p> <p>The two winning teams of 2020 have proposed two very different experiments. This illustrates the wide spectrum of research questions that are possible within the boundary conditions of BL4S. The team Nations' Flying Foxes from Switzerland wants to detect a particle known as Δ+ Baryon. When high energy electrons interact with protons, these protons can be converted into the Δ+ particle. As the particle has a very short lifetime, the team will have to look for indirect signatures pretty much in the same way as short-lived particles are detected in the large experiments at CERN and DESY.</p> <p>“From the first brainstorming session for ideas two years ago, to finally going to DESY in a few months – this has been an amazing journey. What an incredible moment! This will truly shape our academic careers well into the future,” said Mikhail Slepovskiy from the Nations’ Flying Foxes team.</p> <p>The team ChDR Cheese from Germany wants to use a physics effect known as Cherenkov Diffraction Radiation (ChDR) as the basis of an innovative technology for the diagnosis of particle beams in accelerators. When particles move along certain materials such as fused silica, photons can be created while the particle beam itself is not disturbed. The properties of these photons, however, provide information about the beam that is valuable for the accelerator control system.</p> <p>“Hearing that we had won baffled all of us. It was like a dream come true. We are tremendously grateful to DESY and CERN for giving us this incredible opportunity and cheering us up in such trying times,” said Tobias Baumgartner from the ChDR Cheese team.</p> <p>Beamline for Schools is an Education and Outreach project funded by the <a href="https://cernandsocietyfoundation.cern/">CERN &amp; Society Foundation</a> and supported by individual donors, foundations and companies. For 2020, the competition is partly supported by the Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Foundation with additional contributions from the Arconic Foundation as well as from the Ernest Solvay Fund, managed by the King Baudouin Foundation.</p> <p><strong>Further information:</strong></p> <ul><li>BL4S website: <a href="http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch">http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch</a></li> <li>2020 edition: <a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/editions/2020-edition">https://beamlinefor schools.cern/ editions/2020-edition</a></li> <li>Shortlisted and special mention teams 2020: <a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/bl4s-shortlisted-and-special-mention-teams-2020">https://beamlineforschools.cern/bl4s-shortlisted-and-special-mention-teams-2020</a></li> <li>Previous winners: <a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/bl4s-competition/winners">https://beamline forschools. cern/bl4s-competition/winners</a></li> </ul><p><strong>About CERN</strong></p> <p>CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is one of the world's leading laboratories for particle physics. The Organization is located on the French-Swiss border, with its headquarters in Geneva. Its Member States are: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. Cyprus and Slovenia are Associate Member States in the pre-stage to Membership. Croatia, India, Lithuania, Pakistan, Turkey and Ukraine are Associate Member States. The European Union, Japan, JINR, the Russian Federation, UNESCO and the United States of America currently have Observer status.</p> <p><strong>About the CERN &amp; Society Foundation:</strong></p> <p>The CERN &amp; Society Foundation is a charitable foundation established by CERN to fund a programme of projects. These projects, in the areas of education and outreach, innovation and knowledge exchange, and culture and creativity, are inspired or enabled by CERN, but lie outside of its specific research mandate. The Foundation seeks the support of individuals, trusts, international organizations and commercial entities to help make these projects happen, and spread the CERN spirit of scientific curiosity for the inspiration and benefit of society.</p> <p><strong>About DESY</strong></p> <p>DESY is one of the world’s leading particle accelerator centres. Researchers use the large‐scale facilities at DESY to explore the microcosm in all its variety – ranging from the interaction of tiny elementary particles to the behaviour of innovative nanomaterials, the vital processes that take place between biomolecules and the great mysteries of the universe. The accelerators and detectors that DESY develops and builds at its locations in Hamburg and Zeuthen are unique research tools. DESY is a member of the Helmholtz Association, and receives its funding from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) (90 per cent) and the German federal states of Hamburg and Brandenburg (10 per cent).</p> </div> Mon, 15 Jun 2020 08:33:38 +0000 mailys 155039 at https://home.cern CERN Council appoints Fabiola Gianotti for second term of office as CERN Director General https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/cern-council-appoints-fabiola-gianotti-second-term-office-cern-director <span>CERN Council appoints Fabiola Gianotti for second term of office as CERN Director General</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/145" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">melissa</span></span> <span>Wed, 11/06/2019 - 12:28</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2704198" data-filename="201912-419_02" id="CERN-PHOTO-201912-419-2"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201912-419-2" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Signature - Letter of appointment" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201912-419-2/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Signature of the letter of appointment by Fabiola Gianotti in company of Ursula Bassler, President of the CERN Council <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><em><strong>UPDATE</strong> on 13 December 2019: At its 196th Session, on 12 December, the CERN Council unanimously decided to appoint Fabiola Gianotti as Director-General of CERN for a second term of office of five years, with effect from 1 January 2021.</em></p> <hr /><p>Geneva, 6 November 2019. At its 195th Session today, the <a href="http://council.web.cern.ch/en">CERN Council</a> selected Fabiola Gianotti, as the Organization’s next Director-General, for her second term of office. The appointment will be formalised at the December Session of the Council, and Gianotti’s new five-year term of office will begin on 1 January 2021. This is the first time in CERN’s history that a Director-General has been appointed for a full second term.</p> <p>"I congratulate Fabiola Gianotti very warmly for her reappointment as Director-General for another five-year term of office. With her at the helm, CERN will continue to benefit from her strong leadership and experience, especially for important upcoming projects such as the <a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/high-luminosity-lhc">High-Luminosity LHC</a>, implementation of the European Strategy for Particle Physics, and the construction of the Science Gateway,” said President of the CERN Council, Ursula Bassler.  “During her first term, she excelled in leading our diverse and international scientific organisation, becoming a role model, especially for women in science”.</p> <p>"I am deeply grateful to the CERN Council for their renewed trust. It is a great privilege and a huge responsibility,” said CERN Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti. “The following years will be crucial for laying the foundations of CERN’s future projects and I am honoured to have the opportunity to work with the CERN Member States, Associate Member States, other international partners and the worldwide particle physics community.”</p> <p>Gianotti has been CERN’s Director-General since 1 January 2016. She received her Ph.D. in experimental particle physics from the University of Milano in 1989 and has been a research physicist at CERN since 1994. She was the leader of the ATLAS experiment’s collaboration from March 2009 to February 2013, including the period in which the LHC experiments ATLAS and CMS announced the discovery of the <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/higgs-boson">Higgs boson</a>. The discovery was recognised in 2013 with the Nobel Prize in Physics being awarded to theorists François Englert and Peter Higgs. Gianotti is a member of many international committees, and has received numerous prestigious awards. She was the first woman to become the Director-General of CERN.</p> <p><br /><strong>FOR MORE INFORMATION</strong></p> <p>A Press Briefing will be held at CERN this afternoon at 18:00, with Dr. Gianotti and the President of the CERN Council, Ursula Bassler. The Press Briefing will also be available via video conference. Journalists interested in participating are invited to register by sending an email to <a href="mailto:press@cern.ch">press@cern.ch</a></p> <p><a class="bulletin" href="https://home.cern/about/who-we-are/our-people/biographies/fabiola-gianotti-born-1960-italian">Fabiola Gianotti's biography</a></p> <p>More photos <a class="bulletin" href="http://cds.cern.ch/record/2699004?ln=en">here</a> and <a class="bulletin" href="http://cds.cern.ch/record/2116824?ln=en">here</a></p> </div> Wed, 06 Nov 2019 11:28:50 +0000 melissa 13337 at https://home.cern CERN Open Days: come and explore the future https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/cern-open-days-come-and-explore-future <span>CERN Open Days: come and explore the future</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/145" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">melissa</span></span> <span>Mon, 09/02/2019 - 11:50</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2679130" data-filename="OpenDays2019_OD_Logo_orange" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-7"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-7" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Open Days 2019 logo" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-7/file?size=small"/> </a> <figcaption> Logo of the CERN Open Days 2019 <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>On Saturday, 14 and Sunday, 15 September, CERN will open its doors to the public. Taking advantage of the second long shutdown of the <a href="/science/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">Large Hadron Collider</a>, the Laboratory will be offering visitors of all ages the exceptional opportunity to visit its facilities, discover its groundbreaking technologies, have fun with physics and meet the people who work at the cutting edge of science and technology.</p> <p>Some 150 activities are planned across nine of the Laboratory’s sites. During the two days, you will have the chance to operate a mini accelerator, learn about the medical applications stemming from research at CERN, drive a crane, discover the gigantic detectors and interact with scientists and invited guests. Places will be limited for the underground visits to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments, but there are many other things to discover on the surface. The full list of activities is available on the <a href="https://opendays.cern/">Open Days website</a>.</p> <p>The <a href="/science/accelerators">CERN accelerator complex</a> is currently in shutdown. Work is ongoing to improve the performance of the accelerators and detectors through several upgrades. This technical stop provides an opportunity to visit CERN’s underground facilities, along with many other areas that will be open to visitors for these two days only.</p> <p>“We look forward to welcoming our neighbours, as well as visitors from further afield, to the Open Days, where they will discover the fascinating research we do at CERN and the instruments we use. We are glad to have the opportunity to share with the public our passion for science and the impact of the technologies we develop. Visitors will be welcomed and guided  by scientists from all over the world and other CERN personnel,” says CERN’s Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti.</p> <p>To mark the beginning of this weekend of discovery, CERN’s Director-General will officially open the Laboratory’s doors at 8.30 a.m. on 14 September, at a ceremony attended by representatives of the local authorities.</p> <p>Between 30 000 and 40 000 visitors are expected each day. CERN strongly recommends using sustainable transport and all the sites will be accessible on foot or by bike. It will not be possible to drive onto or park on the visit sites. If you need to come by car, consider car-sharing. Car parks will be available near CERN and shuttles and bus services will take visitors to the visit sites. For people with disabilities, dedicated car parks and shuttles will be available.</p> <p><br /><strong>Practical information:</strong></p> <p>Register at <a href="https://opendays.cern/plan-your-visit">opendays.cern/plan-your-visit</a> and plan your visit using the Open Days app: <a href="https://opendays.cern/app">opendays.cern/app</a></p> <p>For safety reasons, the following roads will be closed to traffic on 14 and 15 September:</p> <ul><li>Route de l’Europe (France)</li> <li>Route de la Vie Chenaille in Echenevex (France), between the D984C and the corner of Route François Estier</li> <li>Route de Meyrin, between the Porte de France roundabout and Route du Mandement (France and Switzerland)</li> <li>Route de Meyrin in Ferney-Voltaire (France) and Avenue Auguste-François-Dubois (Switzerland) in the France-Switzerland direction.</li> </ul><p>The Open Days will take place from 9.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m.</p> <p>Journalists are invited to register for the event using the following link: <a href="https://indico.cern.ch/event/820109/registrations/51031/">indico.cern.ch/event/820109/registrations/51031</a></p> <p><strong>Resources:</strong></p> <p>Open Days website: <a href="https://opendays.cern">opendays.cern</a></p> <p>Videos: <a href="https://videos.cern.ch/record/2680159">videos.cern.ch/record/2680159</a>; <a href="https://videos.cern.ch/record/2684081">https://videos.cern.ch/record/2684081</a>;<a href="https://videos.cern.ch/record/2685153"> https://videos.cern.ch/record/2685153</a></p> <p>Press release of 19 June 2019: <a href="https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/cern-invites-public-explore-future-its-open-days">home.cern/news/press-release/cern/cern-invites-public-explore-future-its-open-days</a></p> <p>Photos from previous Open Days: <a href="https://cds.cern.ch/yourbaskets/display_public?bskid=23896">cds.cern.ch/yourbaskets/display_public?bskid=23896</a></p> </div> Mon, 02 Sep 2019 09:50:08 +0000 melissa 11972 at https://home.cern LHC experiments present new Higgs results at 2019 EPS-HEP conference https://home.cern/news/press-release/physics/lhc-experiments-present-new-higgs-results-2019-eps-hep-conference <span>LHC experiments present new Higgs results at 2019 EPS-HEP conference</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">achintya</span></span> <span>Mon, 07/15/2019 - 15:18</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2682792" data-filename="eps-hep-2019" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-083-1"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-083-1" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Combined image showing Higgs candidates from ATLAS (left) and CMS (right)" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-083-1/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>At the <a href="http://eps-hep2019.eu/">2019 European Physical Society’s High-Energy Physics conference (EPS-HEP)</a> taking place in Ghent, Belgium, the <a href="/science/experiments/atlas">ATLAS</a> and <a href="/science/experiments/cms">CMS</a> collaborations presented a suite of new results. These include several analyses using the full dataset from the second run of CERN’s <a href="/science/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">Large Hadron Collider (LHC)</a>, recorded at a collision energy of 13 TeV between 2015 and 2018. Among the highlights are the latest precision measurements involving the <a href="/science/physics/higgs-boson">Higgs boson</a>. In only seven years since its discovery, scientists have carefully studied several of the properties of this unique particle, which is increasingly becoming a powerful tool in the search for new physics.</p> <p>The results include new searches for transformations (or “decays”) of the Higgs boson into pairs of muons and into pairs of charm quarks. Both ATLAS and CMS also measured previously unexplored properties of decays of the Higgs boson that involve electroweak bosons (the <a href="/science/physics/w-boson-sunshine-and-stardust">W</a>, the <a href="/science/physics/z-boson">Z</a> and the photon) and compared these with the predictions of the <a href="/science/physics/standard-model">Standard Model (SM) of particle physics</a>. ATLAS and CMS will continue these studies over the course of the LHC’s Run 3 (2021 to 2023) and in the era of the <a href="/science/accelerators/high-luminosity-lhc">High-Luminosity LHC</a> (from 2026 onwards).</p> <p>The Higgs boson is the quantum manifestation of the all-pervading Higgs field, which gives mass to elementary particles it interacts with, via the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism. Scientists look for such interactions between the Higgs boson and elementary particles, either by studying specific decays of the Higgs boson or by searching for instances where the Higgs boson is produced along with other particles. The Higgs boson decays almost instantly after being produced in the LHC and it is by looking through its decay products that scientists can probe its behaviour.</p> <p>In the LHC’s Run 1 (2010 to 2012), decays of the Higgs boson involving pairs of electroweak bosons were observed. Now, the complete Run 2 dataset – around 140 inverse femtobarns each, the equivalent of over 10 000 trillion collisions – provides a much larger sample of Higgs bosons to study, allowing measurements of the particle’s properties to be made with unprecedented precision. ATLAS and CMS have measured the so-called “differential cross-sections” of the bosonic decay processes, which look at not just the production rate of Higgs bosons but also the distribution and orientation of the decay products relative to the colliding proton beams. These measurements provide insight into the underlying mechanism that produces the Higgs bosons. Both collaborations determined that the observed rates and distributions are compatible with those predicted by the Standard Model, at the current rate of statistical uncertainty.</p> <figure class="cds-image" id="ATLAS-PHOTO-2019-026-3"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/ATLAS-PHOTO-2019-026-3" title="View on CDS"><img alt="Higgs Candidates,Proton Collisions,Event Displays,Physics,ATLAS" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/ATLAS-PHOTO-2019-026-3/file?size=large" /></a> <figcaption>An event recorded by ATLAS showing a candidate for a Higgs boson produced in association with two top quarks. The Higgs boson decays to four muons (red tracks). There is an additional electron (green track) and four particle jets (yellow cones)<span> (<a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2682219">Image: ATLAS/CERN</a>)</span></figcaption></figure><p>Since the strength of the Higgs boson’s interaction is proportional to the mass of elementary particles, it interacts most strongly with the heaviest generation of fermions, the third. Previously, ATLAS and CMS had each observed these interactions. However, interactions with the lighter second-generation fermions – muons, charm quarks and strange quarks – are considerably rarer. At EPS-HEP, both collaborations reported on their searches for the elusive second-generation interactions.</p> <p>ATLAS presented their first result from searches for Higgs bosons decaying to pairs of muons (H→μμ) with the full Run 2 dataset. This search is complicated by the large background of more typical SM processes that produce pairs of muons. “This result shows that we are now close to the sensitivity required to test the Standard Model’s predictions for this very rare decay of the Higgs boson,” says Karl Jakobs, the ATLAS spokesperson. “However, a definitive statement on the second generation will require the larger datasets that will be provided by the LHC in Run 3 and by the High-Luminosity LHC.”</p> <p>CMS presented their first result on searches for decays of Higgs bosons to pairs of charm quarks (H→cc). When a Higgs boson decays into quarks, these elementary particles immediately produce jets of particles. “Identifying jets formed by charm quarks and isolating them from other types of jets is a huge challenge,” says Roberto Carlin, spokesperson for CMS. “We’re very happy to have shown that we can tackle this difficult decay channel. We have developed novel machine-learning techniques to help with this task.”</p> <figure class="cds-image" id="CMS-PHO-EVENTS-2019-002-6"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CMS-PHO-EVENTS-2019-002-6" title="View on CDS"><img alt="Real Events,For Press" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CMS-PHO-EVENTS-2019-002-6/file?size=large" /></a> <figcaption>An event recorded by CMS showing a candidate for a Higgs boson produced in association with two top quarks. The Higgs boson and top quarks decay leading to a final state with seven jets (orange cones), an electron (green line), a muon (red line) and missing transverse energy (pink line) <span> (<a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2680325">Image: CMS/CERN</a>)</span></figcaption></figure><p>The Higgs boson also acts as a mediator of physics processes in which electroweak bosons scatter or bounce off each other. Studies of these processes with very high statistics serve as powerful tests of the Standard Model. ATLAS presented the first-ever measurement of the scattering of two Z bosons. Observing this scattering completes the picture for the W and Z bosons as ATLAS has previously observed the WZ scattering process and both collaborations the WW process. CMS presented the first observation of electroweak-boson scattering that results in the production of a Z boson and a photon.</p> <p>“The experiments are making big strides in the monumental task of understanding the Higgs boson,” says Eckhard Elsen, CERN’s Director of Research and Computing. “After observation of its coupling to the third-generation fermions, the experiments have now shown that they have the tools at hand to address the even more challenging second generation. The LHC’s precision physics programme is in full swing.”</p> <hr /><p>ATLAS:<br /> - Summary of 2019 EPS-HEP results: <a class="uri" href="https://atlas.cern/updates/atlas-news/new-results-eps-2019">https://atlas.cern/updates/atlas-news/new-results-eps-2019</a><br /> - Physics briefings on 2019 EPS-HEP results: <a class="uri" href="https://atlas.cern/tags/eps-2019">https://atlas.cern/tags/eps-2019</a><br /> - Physics publications: <a class="uri" href="https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/AtlasPublic/Publications">https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/AtlasPublic/Publications</a></p> <p>CMS:<br /> - Summary of 2019 EPS-HEP results: <a class="uri" href="https://cms.cern/news/EPS-HEP2019">https://cms.cern/news/EPS-HEP2019</a><br /> - Physics briefings on 2019 EPS-HEP results: <a class="uri" href="https://cms.cern/tags/cms-physics-briefings-eps-hep-2019">https://cms.cern/tags/cms-physics-briefings-eps-hep-2019</a><br /> - Physics publications: <a class="uri" href="http://cern.ch/cms-results/public-results/publications/">http://cern.ch/cms-results/public-results/publications/</a></p> </div> Mon, 15 Jul 2019 13:18:24 +0000 achintya 11571 at https://home.cern Dutch and US students win 2019 CERN Beamline for Schools competition https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/dutch-and-us-students-win-2019-cern-beamline-schools-competition <span>Dutch and US students win 2019 CERN Beamline for Schools competition </span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/199" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abha</span></span> <span>Mon, 06/24/2019 - 12:32</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-listing-img field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/home.web.cern.ch/files/2019-06/WinnersBL4S.jpg" width="2000" height="860" alt="2019 CERN Beamline for Schools winners (From left) Team from the West High School in Salt Lake City, USA (Image: Kara Budge). Team from the Praedinius Gymnasium in Groningen, Netherlands (Image: Martin Mug)." typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-caption field--type-string-long field--label-hidden field--item">The 2019 CERN Beamline for Schools winners: (from left) Team from the West High School in Salt Lake City, USA (Image: Kara Budge) and team from the Praedinius Gymnasium in Groningen, Netherlands (Image: Martin Mug).</div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Geneva and Hamburg: Two teams of high-school students, one from the <a href="https://praedinius.nl/index.html">Praedinius Gymnasium</a> in Groningen, Netherlands, and one from the <a href="https://west.slcschools.org/">West High School</a> in Salt Lake City, USA, have won the 2019 <a href="http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch/">Beamline for Schools competition</a> (BL4S). In October, these teams will be invited to the <a href="http://www.desy.de/index_eng.html">DESY</a><sup>1 </sup>research centre in Hamburg, Germany, to carry out their proposed experiments together with scientists from CERN and DESY.</p> <p>Beamline for Schools is a unique international competition that is open to high-school students all over the world. The students are invited to submit a proposal for an experiment that uses a beamline. Beamlines deliver a stream of subatomic particles to any given set-up, making it possible to study a broad variety of properties and processes in various scientific disciplines. They are operated at laboratories such as CERN and DESY.</p> <p>Since Beamline for Schools was launched in 2014 almost 10,000 students from 84 countries have participated. This year, 178 teams from 49 countries worldwide submitted a proposal for the sixth edition of the competition.</p> <p>Due to the second Long Shutdown of CERN’s accelerators for maintenance and upgrade, there is currently no beam at CERN, which has opened up opportunities to explore partnerships with other laboratories, namely DESY.</p> <p>“It is a great honour for us to host the finals of this year’s Beamline for Schools competition at DESY,” said Helmut Dosch, Chairman of the DESY Board of Directors. “We are really looking forward to meeting the extraordinary students who made it through with their proposals and we wish them a successful and rewarding time at the lab. We at DESY are committed to fostering the next generation of scientists, which CERN’s Beamline for Schools project does brilliantly.”</p> <p> “We are all very excited to welcome this year’s winners to DESY. This is a new chapter in the history of this competition because, for the first time, we are taking the finals of the competition to another research laboratory. As always, the more then 60 voluntary experts from CERN and DESY evaluated all the proposals for their creativity, motivation, proposed methodology, feasibility and their overall ability to explore some of the concepts of modern particle physics” said Sarah Aretz, BL4S project manager.</p> <p>The two winning teams of 2019 will look at fundamental differences between matter and antimatter. When electrons at high energies collide with a target, such as a piece of graphite, some of their energy gets transferred into photons. These photons can, in turn, transform into other particles. Eventually, a shower of particles at lower energy will develop. The team “Particle Peers” from the Praedinius Gymnasium, Groningen, Netherlands has proposed to compare the properties of the particle showers originating from electrons with those created from positrons, the antimatter partner of the electron.</p> <p>"​I couldn't stop smiling when I heard the news that we’d won. It's unbelievable that we’ll get the opportunity to conduct our experiment with amazing scientists and meet new students who are just as enthusiastic about physics as I am," said Frederiek de Bruine from the “Particle Peers” team.</p> <p>The “DESY Chain” team from the West High School, Salt Lake City, USA, focuses on the properties of scintillators in its proposal. These are materials that are used for particle detection. The students aim to study the performance of these scintillators and compare their sensitivity to electrons and positrons. This may lead to more efficient particle detectors for a wide range of applications.</p> <p>“I’m so excited by the prospect of working at DESY this autumn, it’s such a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. I’m proud to be a part of the first USA team to win the BL4S competition, especially because it provides access to equipment and systems I would otherwise never have dreamt of even seeing,” said August Muller from the “DESY Chain” team.</p> <p>The shortlist consisted of 20 teams, ten of which received a special mention. This is the second time that a Dutch team has won the competition. Previous winners came from schools in the Netherlands, Greece, Italy (twice), South Africa, Poland, the United Kingdom, Canada, India and the Philippines.</p> <p>Beamline for Schools is an <a href="https://cernandsocietyfoundation.cern/projects?field_project_type_target_id=55">Education and Outreach project</a> funded by the CERN &amp; Society Foundation and supported by individual donors, foundations and companies. For 2019, the project is partially funded by the Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Foundation; additional contributions have been received from the Motorola Solutions Foundation, Amgen Switzerland AG and the Ernest Solvay Fund, which is managed by the King Baudouin Foundation.</p> <p><strong>Shortlist drawn up by CERN and DESY experts:</strong></p> <p>A Light in the Darkness (USA)</p> <p>Centaurus Warriors (USA)</p> <p>Cosmic Conquerors (Thailand)</p> <p>DESY Chain (USA)</p> <p>DESYners (USA)</p> <p>JT/High Pawns (Pakistan)</p> <p>Jubarte Team (Brazil)</p> <p>Leftover Leptons (India)</p> <p>Magic Doubly Magic Nuclei (Poland)</p> <p>My Little Positron(Australia)</p> <p>Particle peers (The Netherlands)</p> <p>Raiders of the Lost Quark (UAE)</p> <p>RAM FAM (Australia)</p> <p>Salvo Krevas (Malaysia)</p> <p>Team John Monash Science School (Australia)</p> <p>The Baryonic Six (Sweden)</p> <p>The Lumineers (Pakistan)</p> <p>The Weak Force (South Africa)</p> <p>Unstoppable SPAS (China)</p> <p>Young Researchers (Ukraine)</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Special Mentions:</strong></p> <p>Antimatter Tracker (Argentina)</p> <p>Cherenkoviously Brilliant (UK)</p> <p>EthioCosmos (Ethiopia)</p> <p>Kics Team (Sudan)</p> <p>Kleine Wissenschaftler (Iran)</p> <p>Observers of the microcosm (Ukraine)</p> <p>Quantum Minds (Mexico)</p> <p>SolarBeam (Thailand)</p> <p>Team Pentaquark (Bangladesh)</p> <p>YKS_Young Kurdish Scientists (Iran)</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Further information</strong></p> <p>Video from the team “Particle peers”, Praedinius Gymnasium in Groningen (<a href="https://praedinius.nl/index.html">https://praedinius.nl/index.html</a>), Netherlands: <a href="https://youtu.be/va1ZnjllFDk">https://youtu.be/va1ZnjllFDk</a></p> <p>Video from the team “DESY Chain”, West High School in Salt Lake City  (<a href="https://west.slcschools.org">https://west.slcschools.org</a>), US: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdexfXt2o30">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdexfXt2o30</a></p> <p><a href="http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch">http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch</a></p> <p><a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/2019-edition">https://beamlineforschools.cern/2019-edition</a></p> <p><a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/updates/2019/04/evaluation-sixth-beamline-schools-competition-finally-starts">https://beamlineforschools.cern/updates /2019/04/evaluation-sixth-beamline-schools-competition-finally-starts</a></p> <p>Previous winners: <a href="http://beamlineforschools.cern/bl4s-winners">http://beamlineforschools. cern/bl4s-winners</a></p> <p> </p> <p>1. DESY is one of the world’s leading particle accelerator centres. Researchers use the large‐scale facilities at DESY to explore the microcosm in all its variety – ranging from the interaction of tiny elementary particles to the behaviour of innovative nanomaterials, the vital processes that take place between biomolecules and the great mysteries of the universe. The accelerators and detectors that DESY develops and builds at its locations in Hamburg and Zeuthen are unique research tools. DESY is a member of the Helmholtz Association, and receives its funding from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) (90 per cent) and the German federal states of Hamburg and Brandenburg (10 per cent).</p> </div> Mon, 24 Jun 2019 10:32:09 +0000 abha 11241 at https://home.cern CERN invites the public to explore the future at its Open Days https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/cern-invites-public-explore-future-its-open-days <span>CERN invites the public to explore the future at its Open Days</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/145" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">melissa</span></span> <span>Wed, 06/19/2019 - 10:15</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2679130" data-filename="OpenDays2019_OD_Logo_orange" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-7"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-7" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Open Days 2019 logo" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-7/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Logo of the CERN Open Days 2019 <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>On 14 and 15 September, CERN will open its scientific facilities to the public from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Under the banner “Explore the future with us”, everyone is invited to come along to the Open Days to live the CERN experience and meet the men and women working on the technologies and discoveries of today and tomorrow.</p> <p>As always during the Open Days, the underground experiments and machines will, exceptionally, be accessible to the public. The weekend will be an unmissable opportunity to discuss, explore and have fun with science. The laboratories, workshops and control rooms on the surface will also be open. From theatre performances to proton football and chats over coffee with physicists, the event has the perfect mix of ingredients to take visitors of all ages into the very heart of one of the largest physics laboratories in the world.</p> <p>Entrance to the nine visit sites will be free and open to everyone. There will be plenty for all age groups to enjoy, with physics shows, demonstrations by firefighters and worksite machinery operators, face-to-face encounters with the LHC robots and escape games on offer to keep the youngest visitors enthralled. The list of activities is available on the <span class="MsoHyperlink" style="color:blue"><span style="text-decoration:underline"><a href="https://opendays.cern/" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Open Days website.</a></span></span></p> <p>“Education and introducing younger generations to science are key to meeting the challenges of the future,” says CERN’s Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti. “The Open Days are an opportunity to spark new passions, but also to introduce experts and novices of all ages to our machines, the technologies we use and their applications in our daily lives.”<i></i></p> <p>The 2019 Open Days will take place during the second long shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), providing a unique opportunity to discover the major upgrade work that is currently being carried out at CERN in preparation for the LHC restart in 2021. This work aims to improve the LHC’s performance and prepare for the arrival of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), which is planned for 2026. During the Open Days, physicists, engineers and technicians will explain all the ins and outs of their work and help visitors to discover the future of particle physics.</p> <p>Some visit itineraries will carry age restrictions: the underground installations will be accessible only to people over 12 years of age. To ensure that as many people as possible have the chance to explore the underground installations, the number of underground visits per person will be limited to two each day.</p> <p>Registration will be open from 26 June onwards on the <span class="MsoHyperlink" style="color:blue"><span style="text-decoration:underline"><a href="https://opendays.cern/" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Open Days</a></span></span> website. Visitors will also be able to access all the information they need to create their own itinerary and make the most of a unique and unforgettable experience. It is strongly recommended to register online in order to guarantee your place.<i></i></p> <p>The Route de l’Europe and part of the Route de Meyrin will be closed to traffic on both days: visitors are therefore strongly recommended to use public and sustainable transport. Additional buses and trams will run, and a free shuttle service will take visitors to and from the nine visit sites, which are spread out over a large area. Free car parks will be available for motorised vehicles and bicycles. All the necessary measures will be taken to ensure that visitors can enjoy their visit in complete safety. The event will be accessible to people with reduced mobility.</p> <p>To facilitate access, journalists wishing to participate in the event are invited to register in advance: <a href="https://indico.cern.ch/event/820109/">https://indico.cern.ch/event/820109/</a> .</p> <p><b>Resources:</b></p> <p><a href="https://videos.cern.ch/record/2679127">2019 trailer</a></p> <p><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/collection/Open%20Days%202013%20Photos?ln=en">2013 Open Days images</a></p> <p><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/search?ln=en&amp;p=year%3A2008+%28title%3A%27open+days%27+or+subject%3A%22Open+Days%22%29&amp;action_search=Search&amp;op1=a&amp;m1=a&amp;p1=&amp;f1=&amp;c=Photos&amp;sf=&amp;so=d&amp;rm=&amp;rg=10&amp;sc=0&amp;of=hb">2008 Open Days images</a></p> <p><a href="https://opendays.cern/">Open Days website</a></p> <p><strong>Contact details:</strong></p> <p><u><span lang="EN-GB" style="color:#1155cc" xml:lang="EN-GB"><a href="mailto:press@cern.ch" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="color:#1155cc">press@cern.ch</span></a></span></u></p> <p><u><span lang="EN-GB" style="color:#1155cc" xml:lang="EN-GB"><a href="mailto:Open.Days2019@cern.ch" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="color:#1155cc">Open.Days2019@cern.ch</span></a></span></u></p> </div> Wed, 19 Jun 2019 08:15:01 +0000 melissa 11178 at https://home.cern In Granada, the European particle physics community prepares decisions for the future of the field https://home.cern/news/press-release/knowledge-sharing/granada-european-particle-physics-community-prepares-decisions <span>In Granada, the European particle physics community prepares decisions for the future of the field</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/199" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abha</span></span> <span>Mon, 05/13/2019 - 09:48</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-listing-img field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/home.web.cern.ch/files/2019-05/Picture1.png" width="1047" height="679" alt="Image for European Strategy for Particle Physics" typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-caption field--type-string-long field--label-hidden field--item">(Image: CERN)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Geneva and Granada. The European particle physics community is meeting this week in Granada, Spain, to discuss the roadmap for the future of the discipline. The aim of the symposium is to define scientific priorities and technological approaches for the coming years and to consider plans for the medium- and long-term future. An important focus of the discussions will be assessing the various options for the period beyond the lifespan of the Large Hadron Collider.</p> <p>“The Granada symposium is an important step in the process of updating the <a href="https://europeanstrategy.cern/european-strategy-for-particle-physics">European Strategy for Particle Physics</a>¹ and aims to prioritise our scientific goals and prepare for the upcoming generation of facilities and experiments,” said the President of the CERN Council, Ursula Bassler. “The discussions will focus on the scientific reach of potential new projects, the associated technological challenges and the resources required.”</p> <p>The European Strategy Group, which was established to coordinate the update process, has received 160 contributions from the scientific community setting out their views on possible future projects and experiments. The symposium in Granada will provide an opportunity to assess and discuss them.</p> <p>“The intent is to make sure that we have a good understanding of the science priorities of the community and of all the options for realising them,” said the Chair of the European Strategy Group, Professor Halina Abramowicz. “This will ensure that the European Strategy Group is well informed when deciding about the strategy update.”</p> <p>The previous update of the European Strategy, approved in May 2013, recommended that design and feasibility studies be conducted in order for Europe “to be in a position to propose an ambitious post-LHC accelerator project”. Over the last few years, in collaboration with partners from around the world, Europe has therefore been engaging in Research and Development and design projects for a range of ambitious post-LHC facilities under the <a href="https://clic.cern/">CLIC</a> and <a href="https://fcc.web.cern.ch/Pages/default.aspx">FCC</a> umbrellas. A study to investigate the potential to build projects that are complementary to high-energy colliders, exploiting the opportunities offered by CERN’s unique accelerator complex, was also launched by CERN in 2016. These contributions will feed into the discussion, which will also take into account the worldwide particle physics landscape and developments in related fields.</p> <p>“At least two decades will be needed to design and build a new collider to succeed the LHC. Such a machine should maximise the potential for new discoveries and enable major steps forward in our understanding of fundamental physics,” said CERN Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti. “It is not too early to start planning for it as it will take time to develop the new technologies needed for its implementation.”</p> <p>The Granada symposium will be followed up with the compilation of a “briefing book” and with a Strategy Drafting Session, which will take place in Bad Honnef, Germany, from 20 to 24 January 2020. The update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics is due to be completed and approved by the CERN Council in May 2020.</p> <p>An online Question-and-Answer session will be held on Thursday, 16 May at 4 p.m. CEST</p> <p>Reporters interested in participating are invited to register by sending an e-mail to <a href="mailto:press.office@cern.ch">press@cern.ch</a></p> <p>More information:<br /><a href="https://europeanstrategy.cern">https://europeanstrategy.cern</a></p> <hr /><p>¹ The European Strategy for Particle Physics is the cornerstone of Europe’s decision-making process for the long-term future of the field. In accordance with the mandate set by the CERN Council, it is formed through broad consultation of the grass-roots particle physics community, actively solicits the opinions of physicists from around the world and is developed in close coordination with similar processes in the US and Japan in order to ensure coordination between regions and optimal use of global resources.</p> </div> Mon, 13 May 2019 07:48:07 +0000 abha 10849 at https://home.cern