News for CERN Community feed https://home.cern/cern-community/news/rss en Workshop on Efficient Neutron Sources https://home.cern/news/announcement/physics/workshop-efficient-neutron-sources <span>Workshop on Efficient Neutron Sources</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/7476" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">camonnin</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/25/2019 - 16:11</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The <strong>Workshop on Efficient Neutron Sources </strong>– ENS2019 – will bring together nuclear physicists, chemists, material scientists and mechanical engineers to discuss the efficiency of neutron sources, and determine the most promising perspectives for improvement.</p> <p>With the aim of reaching more efficient reactor and accelerator-based neutron sources, ENS2019 will include sessions dedicated to the following topics:</p> <ul><li>Neutron Production</li> <li>Moderators &amp; Reflectors</li> <li>Neutron Guides</li> <li>Instruments &amp; Getectors</li> </ul><p>The <a href="https://www.psi.ch/">Paul Scherrer Institut</a> will host the workshop in Villigen, Switzerland, on September 2-5 2019. The workshop is jointly organized with the <a href="https://europeanspallationsource.se/">European Spallation Source</a> (Sweden) and funded by <a href="https://aries.web.cern.ch/">ARIES</a>, part of the EU-Horizon 2020 program.</p> <p>You can register here: <span class="MsoHyperlink" style="color:blue; text-align:start; text-indent:0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="text-decoration:underline"><span style="font-family:-webkit-standard"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span lang="EN-GB" style="font-size:11pt" xml:lang="EN-GB"><span style="line-height:15.693333625793457px"><span style="font-family:Calibri, sans-serif"><a href="https://indico.psi.ch/event/7274/" style="color:#954f72; text-decoration:underline">https://indico.psi.ch/event/7274/</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span><span style="font-size:medium; text-align:start; text-indent:0px; -webkit-text-stroke-width:0px"><span style="caret-color:#000000"><span style="color:#000000"><span style="font-family:-webkit-standard"><span style="font-style:normal"><span style="font-variant-caps:normal"><span style="font-weight:normal"><span style="letter-spacing:normal"><span style="orphans:auto"><span style="text-transform:none"><span style="white-space:normal"><span style="widows:auto"><span style="word-spacing:0px"><span style="-webkit-text-size-adjust:auto"><span style="text-decoration:none"><span style="display:inline !important"><span style="float:none"></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> </div> Tue, 25 Jun 2019 14:11:18 +0000 camonnin 11249 at https://home.cern Enhancing staff internal mobility opportunities https://home.cern/news/official-news/cern/enhancing-staff-internal-mobility-opportunities <span>Enhancing staff internal mobility opportunities</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">HR Department</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/151" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">anschaef</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/25/2019 - 09:45</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Career development of staff members, with the specific objective of promoting internal mobility (IM), was highlighted among our Director-General’s top five priorities for the Organization’s goals for the year 2018. Consequently, a <a href=" https://hr-dep.web.cern.ch/content/hr-projects">dedicated CERN-wide working group</a> was set up, comprising representatives from each sector and the Staff Association, to make recommendations, with a view to harmonising and streamlining processes and increasing efficiency in the way IM is managed at CERN.</p> <p>As the Project Leader, Valeria Perez Reale, explains: “There have often been misunderstandings of the concept of internal mobility today. It is defined as a change in the professional situation of a staff member. This may take the form of a change of one’s functions, within the same organic unit or in another department, or keeping one’s functions but changing one’s organisational unit.”</p> <p>A key deliverable of the project was a study and analysis of IM at CERN, based on data spanning the last five years, the legal and budget framework, feedback from key stakeholders, the latest research and benchmarking with similar non-profit international research organisations. The conclusions of the study, presented at the HR public meeting in <a href="https://indico.cern.ch/event/737008/">September 2018</a>, showed notably that internal mobility takes place at CERN at an average annual rate of ~2% of staff members on an ad hoc basis, with different practices across the Organization. Staff members were found to be generally positive about IM, although the definition, where to find opportunities and how the process unfolds were identified as key areas to clarify.</p> <p>The working group’s recommendations revolve around three key principles:</p> <ol><li>Defined organisational need: that internal mobility enables the Organization to meet its objectives with experienced internal staff;</li> <li>Transparency: that the opportunities and the process are well documented, measured and known to all staff members in the Organization;</li> <li>Flexibility: that the Organization be able to adapt to changing priorities.</li> </ol><p>A further five dimensions underpin these recommendations: purpose clarity, policy guidelines, process design, platform capability and performance measures.</p> <p>James Purvis, Head of CERN’s HR department, is particularly pleased to see the project come to a successful conclusion: “Internal mobility has been a priority for the Organization for some time now. It has long been associated with diverse misconceptions, and in this context I am pleased to see the project come to fruition following comprehensive data collection, benchmarking and analysis to produce a new set of clear processes and tools for CERN that will further improve and enhance the possibilities and opportunities for internal mobility for all staff members.”</p> <p>Concretely, all public job opportunities listed on <a href="http://careers.cern/">Careers at CERN</a> are by default open to staff members. Further, new dedicated <a href="http://careers.cern/internalmobility">Internal Mobility pages</a> list the specific internal mobility opportunities open exclusively to staff members, as well as the possibility to join the internal mobility pool.</p> <p>The full internal mobility process is now published and detailed in the <a href="https://admin-eguide.web.cern.ch/en/procedure/internal-mobility">Admin e-guide</a>. Metrics will be monitored throughout the year by the HR department and reported on an annual basis to the Organization’s management.</p> <p>For more information, staff members are invited to consult the <a href="https://hr-dep.web.cern.ch/content/internal-mobility">HR Internal Mobility webpage</a>.</p> </div> Tue, 25 Jun 2019 07:45:50 +0000 anschaef 11244 at https://home.cern Dutch and US students win 2019 CERN Beamline for Schools competition https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/dutch-and-us-students-win-2019-cern-beamline-schools-competition <span>Dutch and US students win 2019 CERN Beamline for Schools competition </span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/199" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abha</span></span> <span>Mon, 06/24/2019 - 12:32</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-listing-img field--type-image field--label-hidden field--item"> <img src="/sites/home.web.cern.ch/files/2019-06/WinnersBL4S.jpg" width="2000" height="860" alt="2019 CERN Beamline for Schools winners (From left) Team from the West High School in Salt Lake City, USA (Image: Kara Budge). Team from the Praedinius Gymnasium in Groningen, Netherlands (Image: Martin Mug)." typeof="foaf:Image" class="img-responsive" /> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-caption field--type-string-long field--label-hidden field--item">The 2019 CERN Beamline for Schools winners: (from left) Team from the West High School in Salt Lake City, USA (Image: Kara Budge) and team from the Praedinius Gymnasium in Groningen, Netherlands (Image: Martin Mug).</div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Geneva and Hamburg: Two teams of high-school students, one from the <a href="https://praedinius.nl/index.html">Praedinius Gymnasium</a> in Groningen, Netherlands, and one from the <a href="https://west.slcschools.org/">West High School</a> in Salt Lake City, USA, have won the 2019 <a href="http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch/">Beamline for Schools competition</a> (BL4S). In October, these teams will be invited to the <a href="http://www.desy.de/index_eng.html">DESY</a><sup>1 </sup>research centre in Hamburg, Germany, to carry out their proposed experiments together with scientists from CERN and DESY.</p> <p>Beamline for Schools is a unique international competition that is open to high-school students all over the world. The students are invited to submit a proposal for an experiment that uses a beamline. Beamlines deliver a stream of subatomic particles to any given set-up, making it possible to study a broad variety of properties and processes in various scientific disciplines. They are operated at laboratories such as CERN and DESY.</p> <p>Since Beamline for Schools was launched in 2014 almost 10,000 students from 84 countries have participated. This year, 178 teams from 49 countries worldwide submitted a proposal for the sixth edition of the competition.</p> <p>Due to the second Long Shutdown of CERN’s accelerators for maintenance and upgrade, there is currently no beam at CERN, which has opened up opportunities to explore partnerships with other laboratories, namely DESY.</p> <p>“It is a great honour for us to host the finals of this year’s Beamline for Schools competition at DESY,” said Helmut Dosch, Chairman of the DESY Board of Directors. “We are really looking forward to meeting the extraordinary students who made it through with their proposals and we wish them a successful and rewarding time at the lab. We at DESY are committed to fostering the next generation of scientists, which CERN’s Beamline for Schools project does brilliantly.”</p> <p> “We are all very excited to welcome this year’s winners to DESY. This is a new chapter in the history of this competition because, for the first time, we are taking the finals of the competition to another research laboratory. As always, the more then 60 voluntary experts from CERN and DESY evaluated all the proposals for their creativity, motivation, proposed methodology, feasibility and their overall ability to explore some of the concepts of modern particle physics” said Sarah Aretz, BL4S project manager.</p> <p>The two winning teams of 2019 will look at fundamental differences between matter and antimatter. When electrons at high energies collide with a target, such as a piece of graphite, some of their energy gets transferred into photons. These photons can, in turn, transform into other particles. Eventually, a shower of particles at lower energy will develop. The team “Particle Peers” from the Praedinius Gymnasium, Groningen, Netherlands has proposed to compare the properties of the particle showers originating from electrons with those created from positrons, the antimatter partner of the electron.</p> <p>"​I couldn't stop smiling when I heard the news that we’d won. It's unbelievable that we’ll get the opportunity to conduct our experiment with amazing scientists and meet new students who are just as enthusiastic about physics as I am," said Frederiek de Bruine from the “Particle Peers” team.</p> <p>The “DESY Chain” team from the West High School, Salt Lake City, USA, focuses on the properties of scintillators in its proposal. These are materials that are used for particle detection. The students aim to study the performance of these scintillators and compare their sensitivity to electrons and positrons. This may lead to more efficient particle detectors for a wide range of applications.</p> <p>“I’m so excited by the prospect of working at DESY this autumn, it’s such a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. I’m proud to be a part of the first USA team to win the BL4S competition, especially because it provides access to equipment and systems I would otherwise never have dreamt of even seeing,” said August Muller from the “DESY Chain” team.</p> <p>The shortlist consisted of 20 teams, ten of which received a special mention. This is the second time that a Dutch team has won the competition. Previous winners came from schools in the Netherlands, Greece, Italy (twice), South Africa, Poland, the United Kingdom, Canada, India and the Philippines.</p> <p>Beamline for Schools is an <a href="https://cernandsocietyfoundation.cern/projects?field_project_type_target_id=55">Education and Outreach project</a> funded by the CERN &amp; Society Foundation and supported by individual donors, foundations and companies. For 2019, the project is partially funded by the Wilhelm and Else Heraeus Foundation; additional contributions have been received from the Motorola Solutions Foundation, Amgen Switzerland AG and the Ernest Solvay Fund, which is managed by the King Baudouin Foundation.</p> <p><strong>Shortlist drawn up by CERN and DESY experts:</strong></p> <p>A Light in the Darkness (USA)</p> <p>Centaurus Warriors (USA)</p> <p>Cosmic Conquerors (Thailand)</p> <p>DESY Chain (USA)</p> <p>DESYners (USA)</p> <p>JT/High Pawns (Pakistan)</p> <p>Jubarte Team (Brazil)</p> <p>Leftover Leptons (India)</p> <p>Magic Doubly Magic Nuclei (Poland)</p> <p>My Little Positron(Australia)</p> <p>Particle peers (The Netherlands)</p> <p>Raiders of the Lost Quark (UAE)</p> <p>RAM FAM (Australia)</p> <p>Salvo Krevas (Malaysia)</p> <p>Team John Monash Science School (Australia)</p> <p>The Baryonic Six (Sweden)</p> <p>The Lumineers (Pakistan)</p> <p>The Weak Force (South Africa)</p> <p>Unstoppable SPAS (China)</p> <p>Young Researchers (Ukraine)</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Special Mentions:</strong></p> <p>Antimatter Tracker (Argentina)</p> <p>Cherenkoviously Brilliant (UK)</p> <p>EthioCosmos (Ethiopia)</p> <p>Kics Team (Sudan)</p> <p>Kleine Wissenschaftler (Iran)</p> <p>Observers of the microcosm (Ukraine)</p> <p>Quantum Minds (Mexico)</p> <p>SolarBeam (Thailand)</p> <p>Team Pentaquark (Bangladesh)</p> <p>YKS_Young Kurdish Scientists (Iran)</p> <p><strong>Further information</strong></p> <p>Video from the team “Particle peers”, Praedinius Gymnasium in Groningen (<a href="https://praedinius.nl/index.html">https://praedinius.nl/index.html</a>), Netherlands: <a href="https://youtu.be/va1ZnjllFDk">https://youtu.be/va1ZnjllFDk</a></p> <p>Video from the team “DESY Chain”, West High School in Salt Lake City  (<a href="https://west.slcschools.org">https://west.slcschools.org</a>), US: <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdexfXt2o30">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdexfXt2o30</a></p> <p><a href="http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch">http://beamline-for-schools.web.cern.ch</a></p> <p><a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/2019-edition">https://beamlineforschools.cern/2019-edition</a></p> <p><a href="https://beamlineforschools.cern/updates/2019/04/evaluation-sixth-beamline-schools-competition-finally-starts">https://beamlineforschools.cern/updates/2019/04/evaluation-sixth-beamline-schools-competition-finally-starts</a></p> <p>Previous winners: <a href="http://beamlineforschools.cern/bl4s-winners">http://beamlineforschools.cern/bl4s-winners</a></p> <p> </p> <p>1. DESY is one of the world’s leading particle accelerator centres. Researchers use the large‐scale facilities at DESY to explore the microcosm in all its variety – ranging from the interaction of tiny elementary particles to the behaviour of innovative nanomaterials, the vital processes that take place between biomolecules and the great mysteries of the universe. The accelerators and detectors that DESY develops and builds at its locations in Hamburg and Zeuthen are unique research tools. DESY is a member of the Helmholtz Association, and receives its funding from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) (90 per cent) and the German federal states of Hamburg and Brandenburg (10 per cent).</p> </div> Mon, 24 Jun 2019 10:32:09 +0000 abha 11241 at https://home.cern Arts at CERN: A transformative immersion https://home.cern/news/news/cern/arts-cern-transformative-immersion <span>Arts at CERN: A transformative immersion</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/151" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">anschaef</span></span> <span>Mon, 06/24/2019 - 11:21</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-caption field--type-string-long field--label-hidden field--item">Anne Sylvie Henchoz and Julie Lang (both on the right) during one of the artistic workshops conducted during their residency at CERN (Image: Anne Sylvie Henchoz and Julie Lang)</div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“We immersed ourselves. We probed the scientific world. We listened to scientists without any preconceived ideas.” This is how Anne Sylvie Henchoz, an artist working in various media, describes the residency at CERN that she shared with Julie Lang, an art history and sociology researcher from the University of Lausanne. The two women won the Collide Genève 2018 prize, run by Arts at CERN in collaboration with the Republic and Canton of Geneva and the City of Geneva, which aims to encourage artistic expression in the context of fundamental research.</p> <p>Prior to October 2018, CERN was somewhere “not far away, but a complete unknown all the same” for Geneva resident Anne Sylvie, and “a totally mysterious universe” for Julie, who lives in Vaud. But a few weeks at CERN were enough to transform the pair into science enthusiasts. “The meetings we had were the key to understanding this universe,” explains Julie. “The worldviews of some of the scientists resonated with our respective backgrounds in an intense and unexpected way. We didn’t just try to get to grips with the science, we tried to understand the people and their visions.”</p> <p>After an initial exploratory phase, the artist and the researcher set up meetings with various women at CERN, notably Sara Anne Arezt (S'Cool Lab, CERN), Ana Barbara Rodrigues Cavalcante (EPFL), Francesca Giovacchini (AMS-02 Experiment), Claire Lee (ATLAS), Antonella Del Rosso (ECO-CERN) and Tamara Vazquez Schroeder (ATLAS). “From the outside, CERN seems quite homogeneous but on the inside you discover that it has many different facets and you discover questions being asked about the world and the universe that are very similar to our own,” observes Julie.</p> <p>The third and final month of the residency was devoted to production. “We created a conversation around the plural notion of ‘temporality’, which we developed in a philosophical, poetic and scientific way,” explains Anne Sylvie. “It was a three-way conversation, a trio between Tamara Vazquez Schroeder, Claire Lee and Julie, incorporating body movements, which we filmed in SMA18, a technical maintenance hall that we found very cinematographic.” The result is an art installation that will be exhibited in Rio de Janeiro in a few weeks’ time: “We did a lot of research to put together, conceptualise and stage these encounters, and focused on the points that made the greatest impression on us. The installation will use three different forms of projection and the sound production is particularly unusual.”</p> <p>The two women’s residency at CERN has made such an impression on them that it now influences all their work “as is always the case when the interactions are so intense”.</p> </div> Mon, 24 Jun 2019 09:21:48 +0000 anschaef 11240 at https://home.cern Beat the heat! https://home.cern/news/announcement/cern/beat-heat <span>Beat the heat!</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">CERN Medical Service</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/151" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">anschaef</span></span> <span>Sun, 06/23/2019 - 22:51</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p> </p> <p> </p> </div> Sun, 23 Jun 2019 20:51:05 +0000 anschaef 11239 at https://home.cern CERN restaurants: opening hours during summer 2019 https://home.cern/news/announcement/cern/cern-restaurants-opening-hours-during-summer-2019 <span>CERN restaurants: opening hours during summer 2019</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/7476" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">camonnin</span></span> <span>Fri, 06/21/2019 - 15:28</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>This summer the three CERN restaurants remain open during their usual hours. The ‘Coin Brasserie’ in restaurant 2 will be closed from Monday 29 July to Friday 23 August 2019 included.<br /><br /> The cafeteria will be open as follows:</p> <ul><li>6: normal hours</li> <li>13: normal hours</li> <li>30: normal hours</li> <li>40: from 5 to 30 August: open from 8.30 to 16.30</li> <li>54: from 5 to 30 August: open from 8.00 to 15.30</li> <li>864: open from 9.30 to 10.30 and from 15.00 to 16.00 every day</li> <li>865: open from 9.45 to 10.45 every day</li> <li>774: normal hours</li> </ul></div> Fri, 21 Jun 2019 13:28:28 +0000 camonnin 11205 at https://home.cern Computer Security: Serious gaming… for your own good https://home.cern/news/news/computing/computer-security-serious-gaming-your-own-good <span>Computer Security: Serious gaming… for your own good</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">The Computer Security Team</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/151" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">anschaef</span></span> <span>Fri, 06/21/2019 - 09:31</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>“Serious gaming” is the gamification of training for professional purposes. When you play a serious game, you are actually also improving your knowledge on a particular subject. For example, in 2015, the CERN Computer Security Team ran, in collaboration with an external security provider, the “Kaspersky Interactive Protection Simulation” (<a href="https://media.kaspersky.com/en/business-security/enterprise/KL_SA_KIPS_overview_A4_Eng_web.pdf">KIPS</a>). Attended by about 80 control and safety system experts, technicians and engineers, the goal of the game was to instruct our control system experts how best to secure their installations. In the game, teams of four to six people had to secure a water purification plant round-by-round, by buying new security features and making sure that attackers did not bring the water treatment process to a halt. The team that generated the most revenue and had the least losses won (see details on this in our <em>Bulletin</em> article “<a href="https://cds.cern.ch/journal/CERNBulletin/2015/03/News%20Articles/1980920?ln=en">Protect your Plant: A "Serious Game" about Control System Cyber-Security</a>”).</p> <figure role="group"><img alt="Serious gaming… for your own good " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="b23c83a9-c008-4d04-a77a-192c311b2808" src="/sites/home.web.cern.ch/files/inline-images/anschaef/Computer%202.png" /><figcaption>(Image credit: Kaspersky)</figcaption></figure><p>Nowadays, other online security games permit better in-depth training on a multitude of subjects. Take the <a href="https://lms.cern.ch/ekp/servlet/ekp?CID=EKP000040521&amp;TX=FORMAT1&amp;BACKTOCATALOG=Y&amp;DECORATEPAGE=N">CERN computer security course</a>, for example, which you are supposed to complete to ensure you know the basics of computer security, password protection and CERN’s rules. But there are more fancy ones:</p> <ul><li>Google has produced an interesting <a href="https://phishingquiz.withgoogle.com/">quiz</a>, challenging you to identify malicious e-mails;</li> <li><a href="https://www.rts.ch/">Radio Télévision Suisse</a>’s <a href="https://www.datak.ch/#/start">serious game</a> aims to raise public awareness of the implications of data protection and Big Data;</li> <li>Less related to “computer security”, but great for aspiring programmers: why not learn through <a href="https://codecombat.com/">playing</a> how to <a href="https://www.codingame.com/start">develop code</a> with JavaScript, Python and other languages.</li> </ul><p>Give these a try and enhance your skills in protecting your mailbox, your data and CERN!</p> <p>________</p> <p><em>Do you want to learn more about computer security incidents and issues at CERN? Follow our <a href="https://cern.ch/security/reports/en/monthly_reports.shtml">Monthly Report</a>. For further information, questions or help, check <a href="https://cern.ch/Computer.Security">our website</a> or contact us at Computer.Security@cern.ch.</em></p> </div> Fri, 21 Jun 2019 07:31:28 +0000 anschaef 11203 at https://home.cern 26 to 27 June: Exceptional closure of the biometric-registration service https://home.cern/news/announcement/cern/26-27-june-exceptional-closure-biometric-registration-service <span>26 to 27 June: Exceptional closure of the biometric-registration service</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">The SMB department</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/151" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">anschaef</span></span> <span>Thu, 06/20/2019 - 10:44</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Please note that the <u>biometric</u>-registration service in building 55 will remain closed because of upgrades to the computer system.</p> <p>The service will reopen with its regular working hours on 28 June.</p> <p>Thank you for your understanding.</p> </div> Thu, 20 Jun 2019 08:44:29 +0000 anschaef 11186 at https://home.cern Webcast: EuroCirCol and the Economics of Science https://home.cern/news/announcement/accelerators/webcast-eurocircol-and-economics-science <span>Webcast: EuroCirCol and the Economics of Science</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">achintya</span></span> <span>Thu, 06/20/2019 - 10:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The <a href="http://cern.ch/fccweek2019">2019 FCC Week</a> that takes place in Brussels from 24 to 28 June 2019 is the final event of the CERN-coordinated Horizon 2020 project, EuroCirCol.</p> <p>The event, which will be inaugurated by Wolfgang Burscher (EC Deputy Director for Research and Innovation), Fabiola Gianotti (CERN’s Director General), and Jorgen D’Hondt (Professor, Vrije Universiteit and Chairperson of ECFA) , will be webcast on Monday, 24 June, from 08.30 a.m. CEST. The day’s keynotes, featuring speakers like Nima Arkani Hamed (Institute of Advanced Studies, University of Princeton) and Herman Van Rompuy (President Emeritus of the European Council), will also be available via webcast.</p> <p>On Tuesday, 25 June, a <a href="http://fccweek2019.web.cern.ch/economic-session.htm">workshop on “The Economics of Science”</a>, organised in the frame of the H2020 <a href="https://ri-paths.eu/">RI-PATHS project</a> and opened by Thierry Lagrange (Head of CERN’s Industry, Procurement and Knowledge Transfer department) will also be webcast live. This workshop, which gathers experts from research organisations, universities, EU offices and EC agencies, focuses on how a new research infrastructure can be designed with sustainability in mind. A panel discussion will take place from 4 p.m. to 5.30 p.m.</p> <p>The full programme can be consulted at <a href="http://cern.ch/fccweek2019">cern.ch/fccweek2019</a>.</p> </div> Thu, 20 Jun 2019 08:00:50 +0000 achintya 11185 at https://home.cern Sharing CERN’s expertise in big data with the biomedical community https://home.cern/news/news/knowledge-sharing/sharing-cerns-expertise-big-data-biomedical-community <span>Sharing CERN’s expertise in big data with the biomedical community</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Andrew Purcell</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">achintya</span></span> <span>Thu, 06/20/2019 - 09:47</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2679289" data-filename="pyramidal-cell-simulation" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-068-1"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-068-1" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="A neurological cell simulation" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-068-1/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> A neurological cell simulation carried out through the BioDynaMo project: https://openlab.cern/index.php/project/biodynamo-0 <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>On 6 and 7 June, CERN hosted a first-of-its-kind workshop on big data in medicine. It concluded a two-year pilot investigation into how CERN-developed IT technologies and techniques could be used to address challenges faced in biomedicine. The workshop’s main goal was to establish terms for broader future collaboration with the medical and healthcare research communities.</p> <p>In 2017, CERN adopted a specific knowledge-transfer strategy for medical applications with the aim of sharing knowledge and ideas of particle accelerators, detectors and computing with the medical and healthcare communities to identify relevant applications. Particle physics has pioneered large-scale, distributed, data-driven research models. Now that other scientific fields are collecting and processing ever more data, CERN technologies could help in facing the challenges with data infrastructures, computing technologies, and software applications.</p> <p>This workshop brought together leaders from a variety of fields related to the application of big-data technologies and techniques in biomedicine, including the World Health Organization, the European Commission and a number of leading universities. Topics included personalised medicine, digital health ecosystems, blockchain, data handling and more. Discussions also focused on emerging technologies, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI), as well as the ethics of these technologies — particularly when used in a biomedical context.</p> <p>The discussions will serve as the basis for a white paper to be published later this year, setting out the main societal and economic challenges in medical research and healthcare systems, describing how collaborative platforms and big-data technologies can help addressing such challenges, and providing recommendations on how such multi-disciplinary efforts could be organised.</p> <p><em>To find out more about the workshop read more on the </em><a href="https://openlab.cern/sharing-cerns-expertise-big-data-biomedical-community"><em>CERN o</em><em>penlab website</em></a><em>, and visit </em><a href="https://indico.cern.ch/event/800343/"><em>the event page</em></a><em> to view the presentations.</em></p> </div> Thu, 20 Jun 2019 07:47:15 +0000 achintya 11184 at https://home.cern Le CERN invite le public à explorer le futur, à l’occasion de ses journées portes ouvertes https://home.cern/fr/news/press-release/cern/cern-invites-public-explore-future-its-open-days <span>CERN invites the public to explore the future at its Open Days</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/145" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">melissa</span></span> <span>Wed, 06/19/2019 - 10:15</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2679130" data-filename="OpenDays2019_OD_Logo_orange" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-7"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-7" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Open Days 2019 logo" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-7/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Logo of the CERN Open Days 2019 <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>On 14 and 15 September, CERN will open its scientific facilities to the public from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Under the banner “Explore the future with us”, everyone is invited to come along to the Open Days to live the CERN experience and meet the men and women working on the technologies and discoveries of today and tomorrow.</p> <p>As always during the Open Days, the underground experiments and machines will, exceptionally, be accessible to the public. The weekend will be an unmissable opportunity to discuss, explore and have fun with science. The laboratories, workshops and control rooms on the surface will also be open. From theatre performances to proton football and chats over coffee with physicists, the event has the perfect mix of ingredients to take visitors of all ages into the very heart of one of the largest physics laboratories in the world.</p> <p>Entrance to the nine visit sites will be free and open to everyone. There will be plenty for all age groups to enjoy, with physics shows, demonstrations by firefighters and worksite machinery operators, face-to-face encounters with the LHC robots and escape games on offer to keep the youngest visitors enthralled. The list of activities is available on the <span class="MsoHyperlink" style="color:blue"><span style="text-decoration:underline"><a href="https://opendays.cern/" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Open Days website.</a></span></span></p> <p>“Education and introducing younger generations to science are key to meeting the challenges of the future,” says CERN’s Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti. “The Open Days are an opportunity to spark new passions, but also to introduce experts and novices of all ages to our machines, the technologies we use and their applications in our daily lives.”<i></i></p> <p>The 2019 Open Days will take place during the second long shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), providing a unique opportunity to discover the major upgrade work that is currently being carried out at CERN in preparation for the LHC restart in 2021. This work aims to improve the LHC’s performance and prepare for the arrival of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), which is planned for 2026. During the Open Days, physicists, engineers and technicians will explain all the ins and outs of their work and help visitors to discover the future of particle physics.</p> <p>Some visit itineraries will carry age restrictions: the underground installations will be accessible only to people over 12 years of age. To ensure that as many people as possible have the chance to explore the underground installations, the number of underground visits per person will be limited to two each day.</p> <p>Registration will be open from 26 June onwards on the <span class="MsoHyperlink" style="color:blue"><span style="text-decoration:underline"><a href="https://opendays.cern/" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline">Open Days</a></span></span> website. Visitors will also be able to access all the information they need to create their own itinerary and make the most of a unique and unforgettable experience. It is strongly recommended to register online in order to guarantee your place.<i></i></p> <p>The Route de l’Europe and part of the Route de Meyrin will be closed to traffic on both days: visitors are therefore strongly recommended to use public and sustainable transport. Additional buses and trams will run, and a free shuttle service will take visitors to and from the nine visit sites, which are spread out over a large area. Free car parks will be available for motorised vehicles and bicycles. All the necessary measures will be taken to ensure that visitors can enjoy their visit in complete safety. The event will be accessible to people with reduced mobility.</p> <p>To facilitate access, journalists wishing to participate in the event are invited to register in advance: <a href="https://indico.cern.ch/event/820109/">https://indico.cern.ch/event/820109/</a> .</p> <p><b>Resources:</b></p> <p><a href="https://videos.cern.ch/record/2679127">2019 trailer</a></p> <p><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/collection/Open%20Days%202013%20Photos?ln=en">2013 Open Days images</a></p> <p><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/search?ln=en&amp;p=year%3A2008+%28title%3A%27open+days%27+or+subject%3A%22Open+Days%22%29&amp;action_search=Search&amp;op1=a&amp;m1=a&amp;p1=&amp;f1=&amp;c=Photos&amp;sf=&amp;so=d&amp;rm=&amp;rg=10&amp;sc=0&amp;of=hb">2008 Open Days images</a></p> <p><a href="https://opendays.cern/">Open Days website</a></p> <p><strong>Contact details:</strong></p> <p><u><span lang="EN-GB" style="color:#1155cc" xml:lang="EN-GB"><a href="mailto:press@cern.ch" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="color:#1155cc">press@cern.ch</span></a></span></u></p> <p><u><span lang="EN-GB" style="color:#1155cc" xml:lang="EN-GB"><a href="mailto:Open.Days2019@cern.ch" style="color:blue; text-decoration:underline"><span style="color:#1155cc">Open.Days2019@cern.ch</span></a></span></u></p> </div> Wed, 19 Jun 2019 07:57:36 +0000 melissa 11178 at https://home.cern Open Days for the CERN Community https://home.cern/news/announcement/cern/open-days-cern-community <span>Open Days for the CERN Community</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/146" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cmenard</span></span> <span>Wed, 06/19/2019 - 10:47</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2679130" data-filename="OpenDays2019_OD_Logo_violet" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-10"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-10" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Open Days 2019 logo" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-10/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Logo of the CERN Open Days 2019 <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p> </p> <p>On Friday, 13 September, from 1.30 p.m. to 5.30 p.m., underground visits will be reserved for anyone with an “@cern.ch” account.</p> <p><strong>Which sites can one visit?</strong></p> <p>The sites available for visits are:</p> <ul><li>ATLAS (point 1 of the LHC)</li> <li>ALICE (point 2 of the LHC)</li> <li>CMS (point 5 of the LHC)</li> <li>LHC at point 4, with the accelerating cavities</li> <li>LHC at point 6, with the beam dump</li> </ul><p><strong>Who can visit?</strong></p> <p>Each eligible person (with an “@cern.ch” account) can register up to six people aged 12 or older, including themselves. To allow as many people as possible to enjoy the visits, only one visit per person is possible.</p> <p><strong>How can one register?</strong></p> <p>You must use the the visitor <a href="https://opendays-registration.cern.ch/">registration platform</a>, which will be available from 24 June at 3.00 p. m.</p> <p>Don't forget that you can also <a href="/news/news/cern/cern-open-days-become-volunteer">sign-up to be a volunteer</a>! Of course, outside your slots as a volunteer, you can also attend the Open Days as regular visitors on 14 and 15 September.</p> <p> </p> </div> Wed, 19 Jun 2019 08:47:13 +0000 cmenard 11180 at https://home.cern Prime Minister of the Republic of Slovenia received at CERN https://home.cern/news/news/cern/prime-minister-republic-slovenia-received-cern <span>Prime Minister of the Republic of Slovenia received at CERN</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Anaïs Schaeffer</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/151" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">anschaef</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/18/2019 - 10:03</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>On 11 June, CERN welcomed Marjan Šarec, Prime Minister of the Republic of Slovenia. The Prime Minister was welcomed by the Director-General of CERN at Point 1 of the LHC, together with Eckhard Elsen, Director of Research and Informatics, Charlotte Warakaulle, Director of International Relations, Emmanuel Tsesmelis, Head of Relations with Associate and Non-Member States, and Christoph Schäfer, Senior Advisor on Relations with Slovenia.</p> <p>Following an introduction to CERN’s activities by the Director-General, the Prime Minister took a tour of the LHC tunnel and the ATLAS experimental cavern. He also met representatives of the Slovenian community at CERN.</p> </div> Tue, 18 Jun 2019 08:03:22 +0000 anschaef 11092 at https://home.cern Four decades of gluons https://home.cern/news/news/physics/four-decades-gluons <span>Four decades of gluons </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Ana Lopes</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/159" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abelchio</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/18/2019 - 09:26</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2678861" data-filename="CCEglu4_11-04" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-066-1"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-066-1" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="A three-jet event detected by the TASSO detector." src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-066-1/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> A three-jet event detected by the TASSO detector. <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Forty years ago, in 1979, experiments at the DESY laboratory in Germany provided the first direct proof of the existence of gluons – the carriers of the strong force that “glue” quarks into protons, neutrons and other particles known collectively as hadrons. This discovery was a milestone in the history of particle physics, as it helped establish the theory of the strong force, known as quantum chromodynamics.</p> <p>The results followed from an idea that struck theorist John Ellis while walking in CERN’s corridors in 1976. As Ellis <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/1409.4232">recounts</a>, he was walking over the bridge from the CERN cafeteria back to his office, turning the corner by the library, when it occurred to him that “the simplest experimental situation to search directly for the gluon would be through production via bremsstrahlung in electron–positron annihilation”. In this process, an electron and a positron (the electron’s antiparticle) would annihilate and would occasionally produce three “jets” of particles, one of which being generated by a gluon radiated by a quark–antiquark pair.</p> <p>Ellis and theorists Mary Gaillard and Graham Ross then went on to write a paper titled “<a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0550321376905423?via%3Dihub">Search for Gluons in e+-e– Annihilation</a>” in which they described a calculation of the process and showed how the PETRA collider at DESY and the PEP collider at SLAC would be able to observe it. Ellis then visited DESY, gave a seminar about the idea and talked to experimentalists preparing to work at PETRA.</p> <p>A couple of years later, and following more papers by Ellis, Gaillard and other theorists, PETRA was being commissioned and getting into the energy range required to test this theory. Soon after, at the International Neutrino Conference in Bergen, Norway, on 18 June 1979, researchers presented a three-jet collision event that had just been detected by the TASSO experiment at PETRA.</p> <p>At the European Physical Society conference at CERN a couple of weeks later, the TASSO collaboration presented several three-jet events and results of analyses that showed that the gluon had been discovered. One month later, in August 1979, three other experiments at PETRA showed similar events that lent support to TASSO’s findings.</p> <p class="MsoCommentText">Find out more about the discovery in <a href="http://www.desy.de/news/backgrounders/40_years_of_gluon/index_eng.html">DESY’s coverage of the 40-year anniversary</a>, in <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/1409.4232">Ellis’ account</a>, and in <a href="https://cerncourier.com/twenty-five-years-of-gluons/">this 2004 <em>CERN Courier</em> article</a>.<span class="MsoCommentReference"><span style="font-size:&#10;9.0pt"></span></span><p></p></p> <div style="mso-element:comment-list"><div style="mso-element:comment"><div class="msocomtxt" id="_com_1" language="JavaScript" onmouseout="msoCommentHide('_com_1')" onmouseover="msoCommentShow('_anchor_1','_com_1')"><!--[if !supportAnnotations]--></div><!--[endif]--></div></div></div> Tue, 18 Jun 2019 07:26:24 +0000 abelchio 11091 at https://home.cern Street food comes to the Restaurant 1 terrace https://home.cern/news/announcement/cern/street-food-comes-restaurant-1-terrace <span>Street food comes to the Restaurant 1 terrace</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/151" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">anschaef</span></span> <span>Mon, 06/17/2019 - 10:14</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>For the whole of the summer, from Tuesday, 11 June onwards, a Novae food truck will serve street food on the terrace of Restaurant 1 from 11.30 a.m. until 1.30 p.m.</p> <p>Like <a href="https://home.cern/news/announcement/cern/something-new-lunch-cern-food-truck">the existing food truck project</a> (see the menu <a href="https://novae-restauration.ch/menus/menu-week/cern-api/105">here</a>), this new lunch option aims to mitigate the overcrowding of the restaurants, notably during the summer student period.</p> <p>You can find the Restaurant 1 street food truck menu <a href="https://novae-restauration.ch/menus/menu-week/cern-api/112">here</a>.</p> <p><em>Please note that the street food truck will be closed in bad weather.</em></p> </div> Mon, 17 Jun 2019 08:14:32 +0000 anschaef 11086 at https://home.cern ATLAS homes in on magnetic monopoles https://home.cern/news/news/physics/atlas-homes-magnetic-monopoles <span>ATLAS homes in on magnetic monopoles</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Ana Lopes</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/159" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abelchio</span></span> <span>Fri, 06/14/2019 - 11:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2157891" data-filename="Comparison Monopoles Dipole" id="OPEN-PHO-CHART-2016-004-4"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/OPEN-PHO-CHART-2016-004-4" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Magnetic monopoles and dipoles" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/OPEN-PHO-CHART-2016-004-4/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Conventional bar magnets are also called ‘magnetic dipoles’ because they have two magnetic poles (a “North” and a “South” magnetic pole, like the Earth). In theory, “magnetic monopoles” could exist that act like an isolated “magnetic charge”, i.e. either a “North” or a “South” magnetic pole. <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Break a magnet in two, no matter how small, and you’ll get two magnets, each with a south and a north pole of opposite magnetic nature. However, some theories predict particles with an isolated magnetic pole, which would carry a magnetic charge analogous to a positive or negative electric charge. But despite many searches, such magnetic monopoles have never been spotted at particle colliders. A new search by the <a href="https://atlas.cern/">ATLAS collaboration</a> at CERN places some of the tightest bounds yet on the production rate of these hypothetical particles. These results are complementary to those from CERN’s <a href="/science/experiments/moedal">MoEDAL experiment</a>, which is specifically designed to search for magnetic monopoles.</p> <p>Originally proposed in 1931 by physicist Paul Dirac, magnetic monopoles have since been shown to be an outcome of so-called grand unified theories (GUTs) of particle physics, which <a href="/science/physics/unified-forces">connect fundamental forces at high energies into a single force</a>. Such GUT monopoles typically have masses that are too high for them to be spotted at particle colliders, but some extensions of the <a href="/science/physics/standard-model">Standard Model</a> predict monopoles with masses that could be in a range accessible to colliders.</p> <p>The latest ATLAS search is based on data from proton–proton collisions produced at the <a href="/science/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">Large Hadron Collider</a> at an energy of 13 TeV. The collaboration looked for signs in the data of large energy deposits that would be left behind by the magnetic monopoles in the ATLAS particle detector. The energy deposits would be proportional to their magnetic charge squared. Such large deposits are also an expected signature of high-electric-charge objects (HECOs), which may include mini black holes, so the search was also sensitive to HECOs.</p> <p>The team found no sign of magnetic monopoles or HECOs in the data but improved previous work on several fronts. Firstly, the search achieves improved limits on the production rate of monopoles that carry one or two units of a fundamental magnetic charge called Dirac charge. The new limits surpass those from MoEDAL, although MoEDAL is sensitive to a larger range of magnetic charge – up to five Dirac charges – and <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/1903.08491">can probe monopoles produced by two mechanisms</a>, whereas ATLAS probed only one. MoEDAL researchers are also <a href="/news/news/physics/lhc-beam-pipe-be-mined-monopoles">working towards pushing the experiment to probe monopoles with magnetic charges well beyond five Dirac charges</a>.</p> <p>In addition, the ATLAS search improves limits on the production of HECOs with electric charge between 20 and 60 times the charge of the electron. Finally, the search is the first to probe HECOs with charges greater than 60 times the electron charge, surpassing the charge probed by previous searches by ATLAS and also by the <a href="https://cms.cern/">CMS collaboration</a>.</p> <p>For more information about these results, see the <a href="https://atlas.cern/updates/physics-briefing/new-result-magnetic-monopoles">ATLAS website</a>.</p> </div> Fri, 14 Jun 2019 09:00:40 +0000 abelchio 11076 at https://home.cern The proton, a century on https://home.cern/news/news/physics/proton-century <span>The proton, a century on</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/159" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abelchio</span></span> <span>Thu, 06/13/2019 - 10:11</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>It is 100 years since Ernest Rutherford published his <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14786431003659230">results</a> proving the existence of the proton. For decades, the proton was considered an elementary particle. But ever since researchers at the SLAC and DESY laboratories began firing electrons into protons, beginning in the 1960s, experiments have revealed that the proton has a complex internal structure, one that depends on how you look at it, or rather on how hard you hit it. A century on, however, much remains to be learnt about the proton. Check out the latest edition of the <a href="https://cerncourier.com/"><em>CERN Courier</em></a> and read in-depth articles about what we know and don’t know about the proton.</p> <p>In “<a href="https://cerncourier.com/rutherford-transmutation-and-the-proton/">Rutherford, transmutation and the proton</a>”, you’ll find an account of the historical events leading to Ernest Rutherford’s discovery of the proton, published in 1919. In “<a href="https://cerncourier.com/the-proton-laid-bare/">The proton laid bare</a>”, you can read about scientists’ evolving knowledge of the proton, how a deeper understanding may be key to the search for new physics phenomena, and what remains to be learnt – including the <a href="https://cerncourier.com/the-proton-spin-crisis/">origin of the proton’s spin</a>, <a href="https://cerncourier.com/the-pursuit-of-proton-decay/">whether or not the proton decays</a> on long timescales, and the puzzling, although soon-to-be resolved, <a href="https://cerncourier.com/solving-the-proton-radius-puzzle/">value of its radius</a>.</p> </div> Thu, 13 Jun 2019 08:11:49 +0000 abelchio 11073 at https://home.cern Journées portes ouvertes du CERN : Portez-vous volontaires ! https://home.cern/fr/news/news/cern/cern-open-days-become-volunteer <span>CERN Open Days: become a volunteer!</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/146" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cmenard</span></span> <span>Wed, 06/12/2019 - 00:01</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The next CERN Open Days will take place on 14 and 15 September 2019. Hundreds of activities and visit circuits are being planned to welcome some 80 000 visitors to CERN’s largest public outreach event.</p> <p>Your contribution is invaluable for the success of this gigantic event.</p> <p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>Why volunteer at the 2019 Open Days?</strong></span></p> <ul><li>Take part in a unique event organised every five years by the largest laboratory for particle physics</li> <li>Share our enthusiasm for fundamental research and its fascinating technologies</li> <li>Be a CERN ambassador by sharing your personal experiences with the visitors</li> <li>Be part of the team: meet new colleagues from other departments in a friendly atmosphere</li> </ul><p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>Who can volunteer?</strong></span></p> <p>All CERN personnel, no matter the contract (MPEs, MPAs, Official CERN guides, ENTC, TEMC) as well as Alumni and Club members, aged 18 and over. More information can be found about <a class="bulletin" href="https://espace.cern.ch/OD2019/Volunteers/SitePages/Alumni%20and%20Clubs.aspx">registration for Alumni and Club Members</a>.</p> <p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>What will I get?</strong></span></p> <p>All volunteers will receive exclusive Open Days 2019 volunteer kits as well as a lunch voucher. General and role-specific training sessions will also be organised. find out more about <a class="bulletin" href="https://espace.cern.ch/OD2019/Volunteers/Lists/Statuses%20and%20conditionss/English.aspx">statuses and conditions</a>.</p> <p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>What will I do?</strong></span></p> <p>Activities are aplenty: be a guide, a special-activity entertainer, an info agent, a crowd marshal, a shop assistant, etc. learn more about<a class="bulletin" href="https://espace.cern.ch/OD2019/Volunteers/Lists/Roles%20and%20trainings/English.aspx"> roles and trainings</a>.</p> <p><span style="font-size:24px;"><strong>When and how to register?</strong></span></p> <p>Find all information and instructions to register on <a class="bulletin" href="http://cern.ch/od2019/volunteers">http://cern.ch/od2019/volunteers</a>.</p> </div> Tue, 11 Jun 2019 11:44:03 +0000 cmenard 11049 at https://home.cern LS2 Report: new components installed in the PS Booster https://home.cern/news/news/accelerators/ls2-report-new-components-installed-ps-booster <span>LS2 Report: new components installed in the PS Booster</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Corinne Pralavorio</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/146" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cmenard</span></span> <span>Wed, 06/12/2019 - 08:47</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The shiny blue and yellow structure looks rather like a giant game of Connect Four. In fact, it is the newly installed PS Booster injection system, which will receive negative hydrogen ions from Linac4 and strip them of their two electrons, before sending them off to the Booster’s four rings. The insertion of this key component of the new accelerator marks the completion of an important stage of the work being carried out on the 215 metres of beam lines that make up the PS Booster complex.</p> <p>The PS Booster will be <a href="https://home.cern/news/news/accelerators/ls2-report-metamorphosis-booster">completely overhauled</a> during Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) in the framework of the LHC Injector Upgrade project (LIU). Many components, notably numerous magnets and the radiofrequency acceleration system, have been dismantled and extracted, and the teams are preparing for the arrival of their replacements. Surveyors are marking out the locations of the components of the injection and extraction lines on the ground with great precision, while teams install the service networks (electrical cables, cooling and ventilation ducts).</p> <p>The new acceleration system, which is based on <a href="https://home.cern/news/news/accelerators/new-acceleration-system-ps-booster">Finemet technology</a> and was developed in collaboration with KEK in Japan, is being installed. The first of the three structures that will house the radiofrequency cavities was inserted into the Booster on Thursday, 6 June and, since then, the teams have been busy fitting it with all its equipment.</p> <figure class="cds-image" id="CERN-PHOTO-201906-149-11"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201906-149-11" title="View on CDS"><img alt="LS2,PSB,Finemet,RF System" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201906-149-11/file?size=large" /></a> <figcaption>The first of the three structures that will house the new radiofrequency cavities was inserted into the PS Booster on 6 June 2019<span> (Image: Julien Ordan/CERN)</span></figcaption></figure><p>Each structure contains eight cavities and 48 power amplifiers and is assembled entirely on the surface, before being emptied of its components, ready to be transported. “Each structure weighs 1.5 tonnes, rising to almost 5 tonnes with the cavities and the amplifiers.<em> </em>That’s why we have to dismantle them, transport them and then reassemble them in the accelerator,” explains Matthias Haase, who is coordinating the installation of the cavities.</p> <p>His computer screen shows information pertaining to the roughly 1500 connecting cables that he has patiently inventoried, numbered and mapped. These plans will enable the cable fitters to connect the RF structures to the power supply and to the control room, using power and signal cables. It’s painstaking work, involving specific constraints relating to the sensitivity of the radiofrequency signals. The cables that transmit the commands to the cavities must be exactly the same length for all three structures, or else the three sets of cavities will not be in sync. “A few centimetres make all the difference,” says Matthias Haase.</p> <p>The cavity installation will continue until October, when testing will start, and the commissioning of the new acceleration system will begin in November.</p> </div> Wed, 12 Jun 2019 06:47:48 +0000 cmenard 11061 at https://home.cern Field Works, a discussion with artists-in-residence https://home.cern/news/announcement/cern/field-works-discussion-artists-residence <span>Field Works, a discussion with artists-in-residence</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">achintya</span></span> <span>Wed, 06/12/2019 - 10:03</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Artists Alan Bogana (Switzerland) and Nicole L’Huillier (Chile) are participating in the first edition of <em>Simetría</em>, an exchange residency between CERN and the Chilean astronomical observatories.</p> <p>The artists will present their exploratory works in a discussion entitled <em>Field Works, </em>facilitated by Mónica Bello, curator and head of Arts at CERN. A theme in Alan Bogana’s art is the behaviour of light – real and speculative – and his residency research focuses on the conceptualisation and detection of dark matter. Observation is one of the motifs being explored by Nicole L’Huillier; she inquires into the ghostly natures of both infinitely small particles and large astronomical phenomena. The conversation will provide insights on how the artists gather and evaluate information and experiences during their residencies. It will reveal how laboratories and observatories don’t function only as research spaces for scientists but how they also inspire artistic collaborations and innovations.</p> <p><em>Simetría</em> is a collaboration between<a href="https://arts.cern/"> Arts at CERN</a>, <a href="https://www.almaobservatory.org/en/home/">ALMA</a>, <a href="https://www.eso.org/public/">ESO</a> and the <a href="http://www.cchv.cl/">Chilean Corporation of Video and Electronic Arts</a>, made possible by support from the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia through its exchange programme <a href="https://coincidencia.net/en/supported-projects/simetria-alain-bogana-nicole-lhuillier/">COINCIDENCIA</a>, and from Chile’s Ministry for Culture, the Arts and Heritage, through its New Media Area.</p> <hr /><p><strong><em>Field Works</em>: Alan Bogana &amp; Nicole L’Huillier, presented by Mónica Bello</strong><br /> 3 July, 6.30 p.m.<br /> Centre de la Photographie Genève<br /> BAC Auditoire, 28 rue des Bains, 1205 Genève<br /> Free entry</p> </div> Wed, 12 Jun 2019 08:03:53 +0000 achintya 11064 at https://home.cern