News for general public feed https://home.web.cern.ch/ en ABB and CERN identify 17.4% energy-saving opportunity in the Laboratory’s cooling and ventilation motors https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/knowledge-sharing/abb-and-cern-identify-174-energy-saving-opportunity-laboratorys-cooling <span>ABB and CERN identify 17.4% energy-saving opportunity in the Laboratory’s cooling and ventilation motors</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p style="margin-bottom:17px">In a <a href="https://kt.cern/news/news/cern-partner-industry-innovation-reduce-environmental-impact">joint research project</a> conducted between 2022 and 2023, <a href="https://global.abb/group/en">ABB</a> and CERN developed a roadmap for reducing the energy consumption of CERN’s cooling and ventilation systems via data-driven energy efficiency audits. These systems are responsible for the cooling and ventilation of CERN’s accelerator complex, experimental areas and data centres. The roadmap identified potential annual energy savings of up to 31 gigawatt-hours (GWh). If achieved, these savings could be enough to power more than 18,000 European households<sup>(1)</sup> and could avoid 4 kilotonnes of CO<sub>2</sub> emissions<sup>(2)</sup>, the same as planting 420,000 trees<sup>(3)</sup>.</p> <p>Energy efficiency audits involve evaluating the performance and efficiency of motors, based on their operating data. Such audits help large facilities like CERN to identify the most significant energy-saving opportunities across whole groups of motors. CERN and ABB experts assessed a wide variety of data from motors used for various cooling and ventilation applications. They combined data from multiple sources, including digitally connected motors, CERN’s supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) system, which is responsible for the control and monitoring of the cooling and ventilation installations, and data gathered directly from pumps, piping and instrumentation. The experts analysed the efficiency of the whole system in order to pinpoint the motors that present the best business case for energy efficiency upgrades.</p> <p>Giovanni Anelli, Head of <a href="https://kt.cern/">CERN’s Knowledge Transfer </a>group, said, “The collaboration with ABB was set up with the aim of optimising the Laboratory’s cooling and ventilation infrastructure to reduce its energy consumption, and is in line with CERN’s commitment to minimise its environmental footprint as well as to share the findings publicly for the benefit of society. It’s an excellent example of collaboration where each side brings its own contribution to the table. CERN brings its large-scale infrastructure and ABB contributes with its technology and service expertise. We are very happy with the final result of this research project as we have exceeded our goal of identifying a 10-15% energy efficiency improvement.”</p> <p>“We are proud to cooperate with CERN and to support its goal to conduct physics research with a low-carbon footprint by helping it to improve the energy efficiency of its cooling and ventilation systems,” said Erich Labuda, President of the Motion Services division at ABB.</p> <p>CERN’s next step will be to selectively upgrade motors with the highest energy-saving potential, based on the data collected during the audit.</p> <p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" scrolling="no" src="https://videos.cern.ch/video/OPEN-VIDEO-2024-069-001" width="560"><br /></iframe></p> <p><em><sup>(1) </sup><a href="https://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/statistics-explained/index.php?title=File:Households_consumption_of_electricity_per_capita,_2021_(MWh_per_capita)_07-07-2023.png">EU average </a>(~1670 kWh/year)</em></p> <p><em><sup>(2)</sup><a href="https://eur03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fapp.electricitymaps.com%2Fzone%2FCH&amp;data=05%7C02%7Cioana.parlog%40ro.abb.com%7C552be75fe01045ea5e9808dc1c0c682e%7C372ee9e09ce04033a64ac07073a91ecd%7C0%7C0%7C638416086820776993%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&amp;sdata=CvT7XSmJlMNuUNa%2FoJ4t3GM%2Fjfs4lqCbIhHlB1L3Pw0%3D&amp;reserved=0"> Electricity Maps | Live 24/7 CO<sub>2</sub> emissions of electricity consumption</a></em></p> <p><em><sup>(3) </sup><a href="https://eur03.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fonetreeplanted.org%2Fblogs%2Fstories%2Fhow-much-co2-does-tree-absorb&amp;data=05%7C02%7Cioana.parlog%40ro.abb.com%7C552be75fe01045ea5e9808dc1c0c682e%7C372ee9e09ce04033a64ac07073a91ecd%7C0%7C0%7C638416086820787485%7CUnknown%7CTWFpbGZsb3d8eyJWIjoiMC4wLjAwMDAiLCJQIjoiV2luMzIiLCJBTiI6Ik1haWwiLCJXVCI6Mn0%3D%7C3000%7C%7C%7C&amp;sdata=16vLXval4Tksxg5l5%2BS108ZFGzZi5Xfq%2BpyqQvMMbrI%3D&amp;reserved=0">How Much CO<sub>2</sub> Does A Tree Absorb? – One Tree Planted</a></em></p> <p>_________</p> <p><em>Read the <a href="https://new.abb.com/news/detail/112835/abb-and-cern-identify-174-percent-energy-saving-opportunity-in-cooling-and-ventilation-motors">press release</a> published by ABB today. </em></p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/151" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">anschaef</span></span> <span><time datetime="2024-02-28T10:34:10+01:00" title="Wednesday, February 28, 2024 - 10:34">Wed, 02/28/2024 - 10:34</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Byline</b></div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/authors/cern-knowledge-transfer-group" hreflang="en">CERN Knowledge Transfer group</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-02-28T09:29:03Z">Wed, 02/28/2024 - 10:29</time> </div> </div> Wed, 28 Feb 2024 09:34:10 +0000 anschaef 189546 at https://home.web.cern.ch A new data centre at CERN https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/computing/new-data-centre-cern <span>A new data centre at CERN </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" id="CERN-PHOTO-202402-041-30"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202402-041-30" title="View on CDS"><img alt="Civil Engineering and Infrastructure" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202402-041-30/file?size=large" /></a><figcaption>The inauguration of the new data centre in Prévessin. From left to right: Pippa Wells, CERN’s Deputy Director for Research and Computing; Charlotte Warakaulle, CERN’s Director for International Relations; Aurélie Charillon, Mayor of Prévessins-Moëns; Joachim Mnich, CERN’s Director for Research and Computing; Yves Nussbaum, Director Marché Industrie, AXIMA; and Enrica Porcari, Head of Information Technology Department at CERN. (Image: CERN)</figcaption></figure><p style="margin-bottom:11px">On 23 February 2024, a brand-new data centre was inaugurated on CERN’s Prévessin site (France), marking the completion of a major project for the Organization’s computing strategy. Spanning more than 6000 square metres and including six rooms for IT equipment with a cooling capacity of 2 MW each, the centre will host CPU (central processing unit) servers for physics data processing as well as a small amount of CPU servers and storage capacity for business continuity and disaster recovery (for example, when data is corrupted). CERN’s <a href="https://home.cern/science/computing/data-centre">main data centre</a> on the Meyrin site (Switzerland) will continue to house the majority of the Organization’s data storage capacity.</p> <p>The rate of data production of the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) continues to grow, already reaching some 45 petabytes per week, and this is expected to double in the era of the <a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/high-luminosity-lhc">High-Luminosity LHC</a>, the major upgrade of CERN’s current flagship accelerator, the LHC. The data from these experiments is fed into the <a href="https://home.cern/science/computing/grid">Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG),</a> a collaboration of around 170 data centres distributed across more than 40 countries, with a storage capacity of about 3 exabytes and one million CPU cores distributed across the network. While the Meyrin data centre has so far performed the Tier 0 role, that is, the core for the LHC Computing Grid, the Prévessin centre will provide vital additional computing capacity to CERN.</p> <p>The new building was built in a record time of less than two years. It complies with strict technical requirements to ensure its environmental sustainability, and is equipped with an efficient heat-recovery system that will contribute to heating buildings on the Prévessin site.</p> <p>The backbones of our interconnected world, data centres are energy-intensive infrastructures. According to <a href="https://www.iea.org/energy-system/buildings/data-centres-and-data-transmission-networks">a recent report</a>, their energy consumption accounts for about 1.5% of the European Union’s total electricity consumption. Two parameters characterise the environmental sustainability of a data centre: the power usage effectiveness (PUE) – the ratio of total data centre input power to IT load power – and the water usage effectiveness (WUE) – the ratio between the use of water in data centre systems and the energy consumption of the IT equipment.</p> <p>The new Prévessin centre has a PUE target of 1.1, lower than the worldwide average of 1.6, and close to 1.0, which would be the value for a perfectly efficient data centre, where all the power is delivered to the IT equipment.</p> <p>It has a WUE target of 0.379 litres per kWh thanks to an innovative water recycling system. The cooling system will be automatically triggered when the outside temperature reaches 20 degrees Celsius. Five huge fan-walls installed in each room will ensure that the overall temperature does not exceed 32 degrees Celsius.</p> <p>The new centre was designed, built and will be operated in the framework of a FIDIC (International Federation of Consulting Engineers) Gold Book contract, which also ensures its financial sustainability. The building’s IT rooms will gradually be equipped with up to 78 racks each. Starting from the top-floor rooms, they are expected to be fully equipped over the next ten years.</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/33989" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ndinmore</span></span> <span><time datetime="2024-02-23T15:12:44+01:00" title="Friday, February 23, 2024 - 15:12">Fri, 02/23/2024 - 15:12</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Byline</b></div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/authors/antonella-del-rosso" hreflang="en">Antonella Del Rosso</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-02-23T14:10:29Z">Fri, 02/23/2024 - 15:10</time> </div> </div> Fri, 23 Feb 2024 14:12:44 +0000 ndinmore 189516 at https://home.web.cern.ch From particle physics to medicine https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/cern/particle-physics-medicine <span>From particle physics to medicine</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p> </p> <p>Did you know that particle accelerators are also used to treat cancer? That medical imaging has taken great leaps forwards thanks to the crystals and chips developed for particle physics? And that CERN is home to a facility that develops isotopes for medical research?</p> <p>Ever since X-rays were discovered by Wilhelm Röntgen in 1895, physics and medicine have been closely intertwined. Medical imaging and cancer treatments have benefited from developments in particle physics over the years, and the innovations continue today, including in collaboration with CERN.</p> <p>As part of CERN’s 70th anniversary celebrations, doctors, biologists and physicists will walk you through how the collaboration between fundamental physics and medicine is leading to innovative treatment methods and diagnostic techniques. One special patient – a researcher, writer and populariser of science – will share with us his experience of being treated for cancer in one of the four European centres for hadron therapy.</p> <p>Entrance to the event is free, but registration is mandatory. <a href="https://indico.cern.ch/event/1382946/registrations/">Click here</a> to register.</p> <p>This is the second in a series of events being organised to mark CERN’s 70th anniversary.</p> <p>From the big questions in physics today to the machines of the future and the human adventure of scientific collaboration without borders, CERN invites you to discover the many facets and benefits of its research through lectures, debates and artistic performances.</p> <p>Have your diaries at the ready. Consult the full programme of events on the <a href="https://cern70.cern/events/"> CERN at 70 webpage</a>.</p> <p> </p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/146" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cmenard</span></span> <span><time datetime="2024-02-22T16:55:13+01:00" title="Thursday, February 22, 2024 - 16:55">Thu, 02/22/2024 - 16:55</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-02-22T15:45:24Z">Thu, 02/22/2024 - 16:45</time> </div> </div> Thu, 22 Feb 2024 15:55:13 +0000 cmenard 189503 at https://home.web.cern.ch AEgIS experiment paves the way for new set of antimatter studies by laser-cooling positronium https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/physics/aegis-experiment-paves-way-new-set-antimatter-studies-laser-cooling-positronium <span>AEgIS experiment paves the way for new set of antimatter studies by laser-cooling positronium</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><a href="https://home.cern/science/experiments/aegis">AEgIS</a> is one of several experiments at CERN’s Antimatter Factory producing and studying antihydrogen atoms with the goal of testing with high precision whether <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/antimatter">antimatter</a> and matter fall to Earth in the same way. In a <a href="https://journals.aps.org/prl/accepted/0307fY1dX331e084749a86c8efb9a364a32ba30f0">paper</a> published today in <em>Physical Review Letters</em>, the AEgIS collaboration reports an experimental feat that will not only help it achieve this goal but also pave the way for a whole new set of antimatter studies, including the prospect to produce a gamma-ray laser that would allow researchers to look inside the atomic nucleus and have applications beyond physics.</p> <p>To create antihydrogen (a positron orbiting an antiproton), AEgIS directs a beam of positronium (an electron orbiting a positron) into a cloud of antiprotons produced and slowed down in the Antimatter Factory. When an antiproton and a positronium meet in the antiproton cloud, the positronium gives up its positron to the antiproton, forming antihydrogen.</p> <p>Producing antihydrogen in this way means that AEgIS can also study positronium, an antimatter system in its own right that is being investigated by experiments worldwide.</p> <p>Positronium has a very short lifetime, annihilating into gamma rays in 142 billionths of a second. However, because it comprises just two point-like particles, the electron and its antimatter counterpart, “it’s a perfect system to do experiments with”, says AEgIS spokesperson Ruggero Caravita, “provided that, among other experimental challenges, a sample of positronium can be cooled enough to measure it with high precision”.</p> <p>This is the feat accomplished by the AEgIS team. By applying the technique of laser cooling to a sample of positronium, the collaboration has already managed to more than halve the temperature of the sample, from 380 to 170 degrees kelvin. In follow-up experiments the team aims to break the barrier of 10 degrees kelvin.</p> <p>AEgIS’ laser cooling of positronium opens up new possibilities for antimatter research. These include high-precision measurements of the properties and gravitational behaviour of this exotic but simple matter–antimatter system, which could reveal new physics. It also allows the production of a positronium Bose–Einstein condensate, in which all constituents occupy the same quantum state. Such a condensate has been proposed as a candidate to produce coherent gamma-ray light via the matter-antimatter annihilation of its constituents – laser-like light made up of monochromatic waves that have a constant phase difference between them.</p> <p>“A Bose-Einstein condensate of antimatter would be an incredible tool for both fundamental and applied research, especially if it allowed the production of coherent gamma-ray light with which researchers could peer into the atomic nucleus.” says Caravita.</p> <p>Laser cooling, which was <a href="https://home.cern/news/press-release/experiments/alpha-cools-antimatter-using-laser-light-first-time">applied to antimatter atoms for the first time</a> about three years ago, works by slowing down atoms bit by bit with laser photons over the course of many cycles of photon absorption and emission. This is normally done using a narrowband laser, which emits light with a small frequency range. By contrast, the AEgIS team uses a broadband laser in their study.</p> <p>“A broadband laser cools not just a small but a large fraction of the positronium sample,” explains Caravita. “What’s more, we carried out the experiment without applying any external electric or magnetic field, simplifying the experimental set-up and extending the positronium lifetime.”</p> <p>The AEgIS collaboration shares its achievement of positronium laser cooling with an independent team, which used a different technique and posted their result on the <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/2310.08761">arXiv</a> preprint server on the same day as AEgIS.<br />  </p> <p><strong>Further material:</strong><br /><a href="https://cernbox.cern.ch/files/link/public/03jdYcG4OGqWU7p?tiles-size=1&amp;items-per-page=100&amp;view-mode=resource-table">Video collection</a><br /><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2888797">Photo collection 1</a><br /><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2887296?ln=fr">Photo collection 2</a></p> <p><strong>About AEgIS:</strong><br /> The AEgIS collaboration is composed of several research groups from CERN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (units of Milano, Pavia and the Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications), the University of Oslo, the Universite Paris-Saclay and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, the University of Liverpool, the Warsaw University of Technology, the University of Trento, the Jagiellonian University of Krakow, the Raman Research Institute of Bangalore, the University of Innsbruck, the University and the Politecnico of Milan, the University of Brescia, the Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun, the University of Latvia, the Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences and the Czech Technical University of Prague.</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/29677" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">sandrika</span></span> <span><time datetime="2024-02-16T14:50:47+01:00" title="Friday, February 16, 2024 - 14:50">Fri, 02/16/2024 - 14:50</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-02-22T15:30:56Z">Thu, 02/22/2024 - 16:30</time> </div> </div> Fri, 16 Feb 2024 13:50:47 +0000 sandrika 189472 at https://home.web.cern.ch CERN’s accelerators gear up for action after the winter maintenance break https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/accelerators/cerns-accelerators-gear-action-after-winter-maintenance-break <span>CERN’s accelerators gear up for action after the winter maintenance break</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p style="text-align:justify">As winter bids farewell, the recommissioning of <a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/accelerator-complex">CERN’s accelerator complex</a> gathers pace, with the scientific community eagerly awaiting particle beams in their experiments. Following the traditional winter break (called the “year-end technical stop” (YETS)), the Linear accelerator 4 (<a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/linear-accelerator-4">Linac4</a>) is the first machine to resume beam operation, followed by the downstream machines: the Proton Synchrotron Booster (<a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/proton-synchrotron-booster">PSB</a>), Proton Synchrotron (<a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/proton-synchrotron">PS</a>), Super Proton Synchrotron (<a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/super-proton-synchrotron">SPS</a>) and Large Hadron Collider (<a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">LHC</a>).</p> <p>Beam entered Linac4 on 5 February, and the PS Booster a few days later. This week, the first beam was injected into the PS, which is now preparing the first beam for the SPS beam commissioning, scheduled to start on 1 March. The first particle beams will reach the LHC on 11 March.</p> <p>The expectations for 2024 are high. In the LHC, the focus is on <a href="https://home.cern/news/opinion/cern/luminosity-why-dont-we-just-say-collision-rate">luminosity</a> production with proton–proton collisions. The luminosity is an important indicator of the performance of an accelerator: it is proportional to the number of collisions that occur in the experiments in a given amount of time. The higher the luminosity, the more data the experiments can gather to allow them to observe rare processes.</p> <p>The 2024 LHC run will conclude with lead–lead ion collisions; the first lead ions will be injected into the LHC on 6 October. The 2024 run is scheduled to end on 28 October.</p> <p>The resumption of operation of the accelerator complex heralds a new year of physics, surely leading to important physics results. As the countdown to 11 March continues, the operations and other expert teams are working diligently to prepare the machines and the beams for another successful physics run.</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/151" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">anschaef</span></span> <span><time datetime="2024-02-21T11:32:32+01:00" title="Wednesday, February 21, 2024 - 11:32">Wed, 02/21/2024 - 11:32</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Byline</b></div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/authors/rende-steerenberg" hreflang="en">Rende Steerenberg</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-02-22T08:31:31Z">Thu, 02/22/2024 - 09:31</time> </div> </div> Wed, 21 Feb 2024 10:32:32 +0000 anschaef 189490 at https://home.web.cern.ch CMS collaboration explores how AI can be used to search for partner particles to the Higgs boson https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/physics/cms-collaboration-explores-how-ai-can-be-used-search-partner-particles-higgs <span>CMS collaboration explores how AI can be used to search for partner particles to the Higgs boson</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="align-center"><img alt="Event display showing two collimated bursts of light." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="0cdf8c88-86c5-4a4e-bd00-d1d96eb93651" height="auto" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/ndinmore/Event-display.png" width="604" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>Event display showing two collimated bursts of light. (Image: CMS collaboration)</figcaption></figure><p style="margin-bottom:32px">As part of their quest to understand the building blocks of matter, physicists search for evidence of new particles that could confirm the existence of physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). Many of these beyond-SM theories postulate the need for additional partner particles to the Higgs boson. These partners would behave similarly to the SM Higgs boson, for example in terms of their “spin”, but would have a different mass.</p> <p style="margin-bottom:32px">To search for Higgs partner particles, scientists at the <a href="/science/experiments/cms">CMS collaboration</a> look for the signatures of these particles in the data collected by the detector. One such signature is when the particles decay from a heavy Higgs partner (X) particle to two lighter partner particles (φ), which in turn each decay into collimated pairs of photons. Photon signatures are ideal to search for particles with unknown masses as they provide a clean, well-understood signature. However, if the φ is very light, the two photons will significantly overlap with each other and the tools usually applied for the photon identification fall apart.</p> <p>This is where artificial intelligence (AI) comes in. It is well known that machine learning computer vision techniques can differentiate between many faces, and now such AI methodologies are becoming useful tools in particle physics.</p> <p>The CMS experiment searched for the X and φ partners of the Higgs boson using the hypothetical process X→φφ, with both φ decaying to collimated photon pairs. To do this, they trained two AI algorithms to distinguish the overlapping pairs of photons from noise, as well as to precisely determine the mass of the particle from which they originated. A wide range of masses was explored. No evidence for such new particles was seen, enabling them to set upper limits on the production rate of this process. The result is the most sensitive search yet performed for such Higgs-like particles in this final state.</p> <p>How can the scientists test the AI’s effectiveness? It is not as easy as verifying AI facial differentiation, where you can simply check by looking. Thankfully, the SM has well-understood processes, which CMS physicists used to validate and control the AI techniques. For example, the η meson, which also decays to two photons, provided an ideal test bench. Scientists at CMS were able to cleanly identify and reconstruct the η meson when searching for its decay into photons when they applied these AI techniques.</p> <p>This analysis clearly shows that AI algorithms can be used to cleanly identify two-photon signatures from the noise and to search for new massive particles. These machine learning techniques are continuously improving and will continue to be used in unique analyses of LHC data, extending CMS searches to even more challenging cases.</p> <hr /><p><em><a href="https://cms.cern/news/using-computer-vision-techniques-search-new-particles-collimated-bursts-light">Read more here</a></em></p> <p> </p> <p> </p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/33989" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ndinmore</span></span> <span><time datetime="2024-02-20T13:21:07+01:00" title="Tuesday, February 20, 2024 - 13:21">Tue, 02/20/2024 - 13:21</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Byline</b></div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/authors/cms-collaboration" hreflang="en">CMS collaboration</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-02-21T08:30:26Z">Wed, 02/21/2024 - 09:30</time> </div> </div> Tue, 20 Feb 2024 12:21:07 +0000 ndinmore 189485 at https://home.web.cern.ch Hearing the sound of quark–gluon plasma https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/physics/hearing-sound-quark-gluon-plasma <span>Hearing the sound of quark–gluon plasma</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Neutron stars in the Universe, ultracold atomic gases in the laboratory, and the quark–gluon plasma created in collisions of atomic nuclei at the <a href="/science/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">Large Hadron Collider</a> (LHC): they may seem totally unrelated but, surprisingly enough, they have something in common. They are all a fluid-like state of matter made up of strongly interacting particles. Insights into the properties and behaviour of any of these almost perfect liquids may be key to understanding nature across scales that are orders of magnitude apart.</p> <p>In a new <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/2401.06896">paper</a>, the <a href="/science/experiments/cms">CMS</a> collaboration reports the most precise measurement to date of the speed at which sound travels in the quark–gluon plasma, offering new insights into this extremely hot state of matter.</p> <p>Sound is a longitudinal wave that travels through a medium, producing compressions and rarefactions of matter in the same direction as its movement. The speed of sound depends on the medium’s properties, such as its density and viscosity. It can therefore be used as a probe of the medium.</p> <p>At the LHC, the quark–gluon plasma is formed in collisions between heavy ions. In these collisions, for a very small fraction of a second, an enormous amount of energy is deposited in a volume whose maximum size is that of the nucleus of an atom. Quarks and gluons emerging from the collision move freely within this area, providing a fluid-like state of matter whose collective dynamics and macroscopic properties are well described by theory. The speed of sound in this environment can be obtained from the rate at which pressure changes in response to variations in energy density or, alternatively, from the rate at which temperature changes in response to variations in entropy, which is a measure of disorder in a system.</p> <p>In heavy-ion collisions, the entropy can be inferred from the number of electrically charged particles emitted from the collisions. The temperature, on the other hand, can be deduced from the average transverse momentum (i.e. the momentum transverse to the collision axis) of those particles. Using data from lead–lead collisions at an energy of 5.02 trillion electronvolts per pair of nucleons (protons or neutrons), the CMS collaboration has measured for the first time how the temperature varies with the entropy in central heavy-ion collisions, in which the ions collide head on and overlap almost completely.</p> <p>From this measurement, they obtained a value for the speed of sound in this medium that is nearly half the speed of light and has a record precision: in units of the speed of light, the squared speed of sound is 0.241, with a statistical uncertainty of 0.002 and a systematic uncertainty of 0.016. Using the mean transverse momentum, they also determined the effective temperature of the quark–gluon plasma to be 219 million electronvolts (MeV), with a systematic uncertainty of 8 MeV.</p> <p>The results match the theoretical expectation and confirm that the quark–gluon plasma acts as a fluid made of particles that carry enormous amounts of energy.</p> <hr /><p><a href="https://cms.cern/news/hearing-sound-quark-gluon-plasma"><em>Read more here</em></a></p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/159" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abelchio</span></span> <span><time datetime="2024-02-08T11:44:10+01:00" title="Thursday, February 8, 2024 - 11:44">Thu, 02/08/2024 - 11:44</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Byline</b></div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/authors/cms-collaboration" hreflang="en">CMS collaboration</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-02-16T10:41:43Z">Fri, 02/16/2024 - 11:41</time> </div> </div> Thu, 08 Feb 2024 10:44:10 +0000 abelchio 189417 at https://home.web.cern.ch CERN Council reviews progress of feasibility study for a next-generation collider https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/accelerators/cern-council-reviews-progress-feasibility-study-next-generation-collider <span>CERN Council reviews progress of feasibility study for a next-generation collider</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>After three years of work, mobilising the expertise of scientists and engineers around the world, the <a href="https://fcc.web.cern.ch/overview">Feasibility Study</a> for the Future Circular Collider (FCC) - a particle collider with a circumference of 90.7 km that could potentially succeed the High-Luminosity LHC in the mid-2040s – has now reached the half-way mark. The Feasibility Study is expected to be completed in 2025.</p> <p>The CERN Council reviewed the work undertaken in a fruitful meeting on 2 February 2024. It congratulated and thanked all the teams involved in the study for the excellent and significant work done so far and for the impressive progress, and looks forward to receiving the final report in 2025.</p> <p>Particle colliders have played a crucial role in elucidating the fundamental laws of nature and constituents of matter. The Feasibility Study for the FCC was <a href="/news/news/accelerators/feasibility-study-possible-future-circular-collider-fcc-gets-under-way">launched</a> in response to a recommendation from the <a href="/news/news/physics/particle-physicists-update-strategy-future-field-europe">2020 update of the European Strategy for Particle Physics</a>, whereby Europe, in collaboration with the worldwide community, should undertake a technical and financial feasibility study for a next-generation hadron collider at the highest achievable energy, with an electron-positron collider as a possible first stage.</p> <p>If approved by CERN’s Member States in the coming years, the construction of the first stage, an electron-positron collider (FCC-ee), could start in the early 2030s and operate in the mid-2040s. The facility would operate for some 15 years, during which time the high-field magnet technology needed for the second stage, a proton-proton collider operating at an unprecedented collision energy of around 100 TeV (FCC-hh), could be developed and industrialised.</p> <p>Accelerator, detector, and physics studies continue within the global <a href="https://fcc.web.cern.ch/">FCC collaboration</a>, spanning 150 institutes in 30 countries.</p> <p><strong>Relevant links:</strong></p> <p><a href="/news/press-release/accelerators/international-collaboration-publishes-concept-design-post-lhc">https://home.cern/news/press-release/accelerators/international-collaboration-publishes-concept-design-post-lhc</a></p> <p><a href="/news/press-release/cern/cern-prepares-its-long-term-future">https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/cern-prepares-its-long-term-future</a></p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/159" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abelchio</span></span> <span><time datetime="2024-02-13T10:48:51+01:00" title="Tuesday, February 13, 2024 - 10:48">Tue, 02/13/2024 - 10:48</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-02-13T09:39:31Z">Tue, 02/13/2024 - 10:39</time> </div> </div> Tue, 13 Feb 2024 09:48:51 +0000 abelchio 189450 at https://home.web.cern.ch Stories from CERN's women in science https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/cern/stories-cerns-women-science <span>Stories from CERN&#039;s women in science</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Each year, on 11 February, CERN celebrates the International Day of Women and Girls in Science by shedding light on the variety of career paths for women in STEM. This year, we asked nine female scientists to share their stories with us and tell us what inspired them to pursue a STEM career and what are their favourite memories involving science.</p> <p><strong>Sorina, physicist at the CMS experiment</strong></p> <p><img alt="Sorina Popescu, CMS physicist, pictured in the LHC tunnel" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="30e588ac-3d03-4bff-b474-bccbc012b87c" height="auto" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/cmenard/2-Sorina.png" width="1440" loading="lazy" /></p> <p>Sorina is a Romanian research physicist at the <a href="/science/experiments/cms">CMS experiment</a>, working on heavy-ion research.</p> <p>“My favourite thing about my job is the data analysis, as well as detector development and installation. I am very happy when I can work with the students. The most rewarding part of it is when I see their careers as physicists evolve.”</p> <p><strong>Jenny, PhD student at the ATLAS experiment</strong></p> <p><strong><img alt="Jenny Lunde, in a clean room working on pixel chips for the ATLAS detector" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="dfd6c6f4-d5d5-4da0-8d83-9085cd33b2aa" height="auto" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/cmenard/3-Jenny.png" width="1440" loading="lazy" /></strong></p> <p>Jenny is a Norwegian doctoral student at the University of Oslo. She’s currently working on upgrading the pixel detector for the <a href="/science/experiments/atlas">ATLAS experiment</a>.</p> <p>Science was her favourite class in school, which inspired her to pursue a career in STEM. “My curiosity for science started with what we can see in our everyday lives, for example how yeast makes bread dough rise, how a candle flame goes out if it loses access to oxygen, or how nature changes with the seasons.”</p> <p><strong>Pinelopi, PhD student with the Medipix collaboration</strong></p> <p><strong><img alt="Pinelopi, PhD student in the Medipix chip laboratory" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="a3c9ff1c-18ac-4d7d-8b66-a805c8b830e8" height="auto" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/cmenard/4-Pinelopi.png" width="1440" loading="lazy" /></strong></p> <p>Pinelopi is a PhD student with the <a href="https://kt.cern/medtech/medipix">Medipix collaboration</a>. Medipix chips developed for pixel detectors at the LHC are now used in a variety of fields, including medical imaging.</p> <p>It was her family and her secondary school experiences that inspired Pinelopi to pursue a career in STEM. “My mother studied physics, so I wanted to become like her, while my father loves to explore ideas and think outside the box. As a secondary school student, I visited CERN with my class, and I was amazed by everything. My dream was to one day return as a physicist.”</p> <p><strong>Federica, PhD student at the LHCb experiment</strong></p> <p><strong><img alt="Federica, PhD student at the LHCb experiment, cabling in the experiment underground hall." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="e0c6bb01-3df6-493a-95d3-49c64c032b51" height="auto" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/cmenard/5-Federica.png" width="1440" loading="lazy" /></strong></p> <p>Federica is an Italian doctoral student in particle physics, working on heavy-ion physics at the <a href="/science/experiments/lhcb">LHCb experiment</a>. She is currently involved in putting the VELO detector into service.</p> <p>Federica has always been curious about science and knew from an early age that she was going to pursue a STEM career. Her favourite memory involving science goes back to secondary school, when two CERN physicists visited her class to give a masterclass. “They built a hand-made cloud chamber for us, with things you could find in the kitchen, to detect the particles from cosmic rays. And I fell in love with particle physics!” remembers Federica.</p> <p><strong>Joni, physicist at the ATLAS experiment</strong></p> <p><strong><img alt="Joni, is eating in front of a computer inside the ATLAS control room" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="5a9be49c-8e53-4c85-aed1-2cbd0a2b427d" height="auto" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/cmenard/6-Joni.png" width="1440" loading="lazy" /></strong></p> <p>Joni, a Vietnamese physicist from the University of Melbourne, focuses mainly on data analysis for heavy-ion collisions at the <a href="/science/experiments/atlas">ATLAS experiment</a>. She’s also involved in the operation of the ATLAS detector.</p> <p>Joni is passionate about science communication and education activities, especially for the young generation. Her passion for science was triggered by her curiosity to explore – in her own words – “worlds that are physically unreachable and invisible to the naked eye, like atoms and subatomic particles”.</p> <p>Joni shared with us a glimpse of one of her first big moments at CERN: “When I started working as a run control shifter, I was very nervous, but the shift leader, Clara Nellist, was very kind and supportive of the whole crew. Now that I've become a shift leader myself, I'm truly grateful to Clara and everyone I've had a chance to work with at CERN, who constantly encouraged me to move beyond my comfort zone.”</p> <p><strong>Livia, post-doc at the ALICE experiment</strong></p> <p><strong><img alt="Livia, physicist at ALICE, inside the underground hall of her experiment " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="62104549-8132-4ad4-bce7-f07ab2e6f131" height="auto" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/cmenard/7-Livia.png" width="1440" loading="lazy" /></strong></p> <p>Livia, an Italian physicist, oversees the operation of the muon spectrometer of the <a href="/science/experiments/alice">ALICE experiment</a>. She’s also doing research and development on silicon detectors for the upcoming ALICE detector upgrade.</p> <p>Since secondary school, Livia has always been enthusiastic about science. The experiments in her school’s laboratory and her passion for research convinced Livia to pursue a STEM career.</p> <p>When we asked Livia about her favourite moments at work, she didn’t hesitate: “The amazing and fun time I spent in the ALICE control room, waiting for the LHC beam to arrive, while preparing the detectors for data taking. The most fun for me is doing R&amp;D on particle physics detectors, building them from scratch and then seeing them installed in the experiment caverns.”</p> <p><strong>Tetiana, physicist at the ATLAS experiment</strong></p> <p><strong><img alt="Tetiana, an ATLAS physicist, in front of a model of the ATLAS detector" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="9df136b2-e018-4544-9213-bcd243e5dcfb" height="auto" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/cmenard/8-Tetiana.png" width="1440" loading="lazy" /></strong></p> <p>Tetiana is a Ukrainian physicist from the Annecy Particle Physics Laboratory in France, working on the <a href="/science/experiments/atlas">ATLAS experiment</a>. She works on the upgrade of the electronics for an ATLAS calorimeter. She’s also searching for phenomena beyond the Standard Model.</p> <p>When we asked what inspired her to pursue a STEM career, Tetiana told us that it was an obvious choice for her, as everyone in her family was either a scientist or an engineer. “I decided to do a PhD in physics and mathematics when I was 10 years old.”</p> <p>Her favourite memory involving science from her childhood is growing “beautiful blue crystals from copper sulphate. They were growing on the kitchen windowsill in my home in Kharkiv next to jars of green onions.”</p> <p><strong>Deepti, engineer for the North Area Consolidation project</strong></p> <p><strong><img alt="Deepti, a CERN scientist, in front of her computer " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="512d36d1-b688-4578-b822-a33097554e43" height="auto" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/cmenard/9-Deepti.png" width="1440" loading="lazy" /></strong></p> <p>Deepti is an Indian engineer working on the project to consolidate CERN’s North Area experiment facility.</p> <p>Deepti was always intrigued by the basic principles of science and their everyday utility. Her affinity for STEM kept growing over the years and she decided to pursue a career in mechanical engineering.</p> <p>“During my childhood, I was fascinated by buoyancy, gravity, density and water displacement as I watched paper boats float on water. When I was a young child, I learned to make paper boats and put them on running water during the monsoon season in India.”</p> <p><strong>Alicia, PhD student in the accelerator field</strong></p> <p><strong><img alt="Alicia, PhD student, portrayed behind a model of a LHC magnet " data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="b6fee35a-5074-4062-94a4-bc3b9d2f2594" height="auto" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/cmenard/10-Alicia.png" width="1440" loading="lazy" /></strong></p> <p>Alicia is a Spanish doctoral student working on developing an ultra-fast generator for special magnets used in CERN’s accelerators.</p> <p>During her engineering studies, she enjoyed being in the lab the most, which inspired her to choose this path.</p> <p>“When I was still living in Madrid, I used to go to a secondary school that was very close to the Residencia de Estudiantes [student housing] and I loved that place: the buildings are beautiful, the garden that surrounds it, everything. And then I read a discreet sign that said that this was also a historical site of the European Physical Society. Marie Curie had been there, Einstein too… That may have had an influence on my choice of a degree!” says Alicia.</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/146" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cmenard</span></span> <span><time datetime="2024-02-07T10:46:26+01:00" title="Wednesday, February 7, 2024 - 10:46">Wed, 02/07/2024 - 10:46</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Byline</b></div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/authors/bianca-moisa" hreflang="en">Bianca Moisa</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-02-07T09:23:08Z">Wed, 02/07/2024 - 10:23</time> </div> </div> Wed, 07 Feb 2024 09:46:26 +0000 cmenard 189413 at https://home.web.cern.ch HiLumi News : protéger les composants du futur accélérateur du CERN https://home.web.cern.ch/fr/news/news/accelerators/hilumi-news-protecting-components-cerns-future-accelerator <span>HiLumi News: protecting the components of CERN’s future accelerator</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p style="text-align:justify">A major <a href="https://home.cern/news/news/accelerators/ls2-report-new-lhc-collimators">upgrade of the collimation system</a> of the <a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">Large Hadron Collider</a> (LHC) began during the first long shutdown of CERN’s accelerator complex (LS1, 2013–2015) and continued during LS2 (2019–2021), in preparation for the <a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/high-luminosity-lhc">High-Luminosity LHC</a> (HL-LHC). As its name suggests, the HL-LHC will surpass the LHC in terms of luminosity, i.e. the number of collisions that take place within the LHC experiments. The accelerator’s equipment therefore requires enhanced protection, which is where the collimation system comes in.</p> <p><strong>What is a collimator?</strong><br /> Collimators are movable blocks made of materials that can absorb particles. Shaped like jaws, they close tightly around the beam to clean up particles that stray from their path. The materials used for these jaws and their various components are capable of withstanding extremes of pressure and temperature, as well as high levels of radiation.</p> <p><strong>Why do beams need cleaning?</strong><br /> Particles that stray from the beam path could collide with sensitive accelerator components, such as superconducting magnets, and interfere with their operation or, in the worst case, damage them. To prevent this from happening, collimators are placed at strategic locations around the LHC ring, where they either absorb stray particles or deflect them towards beam dumps. Protection is particularly crucial in the vicinity of the experiments, where the beam size is reduced to increase the chances of collision.</p> <figure class="cds-image align-right" id="CERN-PHOTO-202401-009-8"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202401-009-8" title="View on CDS"><img alt="LHC,HL-LHC,High Luminosity,Collimators" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202401-009-8/file?size=large" /></a> <figcaption>The new collimators are double-beam collimators (here you can clearly see the two beam apertures side by side). This optimised configuration enables both beams to pass through the same vacuum chamber, thus freeing up space for the collimators' jaws. (Image: CERN)</figcaption></figure><p style="text-align:justify">The LHC currently has 118 collimators of different kinds. The future HL-LHC will have 126 collimators, including brand new models custom made at CERN. Recently, two new prototypes (TCLPX and TCTPXH) have been successfully developed and tested, under the supervision of François-Xavier Nuiry, engineer in charge of the HL-LHC collimator production. Destined for LHC interaction points 1 (<a href="https://home.cern/science/experiments/atlas">ATLAS detector</a>) and 5 (<a href="https://home.cern/science/experiments/cms">CMS detector</a>), they are double-beam collimators. This optimised configuration enables two beams (circulating in opposite directions) to pass through the same vacuum chamber, thus freeing up space for the collimators’ jaws, which are thicker and more powerful in this location.</p> <p>“These two prototypes are innovative in several ways,” explains Dylan Baillard, a mechanical engineer in CERN’s <a href="https://sy-dep-sti.web.cern.ch/tcd">Targets, Collimators and Dumps section</a>. “They are fitted with a remote alignment and levelling system, which helps reducing the radiation dose received by the teams working on them. The collimator flanges can be connected and disconnected more easily thanks to integrated connection tools. Finally, ion pumps are used to ensure an excellent vacuum quality because the collimators, which are close to the beams, always operate in a vacuum and must not disrupt the circulation of the beams.”</p> <p>The final tests were successfully completed in December, and series production of the two new types of collimator should begin this year. Twelve double-beam collimators will be installed in the machine during Long Shutdown 3 (LS3, 2026–2028).</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/151" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">anschaef</span></span> <span><time datetime="2024-02-01T11:46:47+01:00" title="Thursday, February 1, 2024 - 11:46">Thu, 02/01/2024 - 11:46</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Byline</b></div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/authors/anais-schaeffer" hreflang="en">Anaïs Schaeffer</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-01-31T10:49:57Z">Wed, 01/31/2024 - 11:49</time> </div> </div> Wed, 31 Jan 2024 10:53:40 +0000 anschaef 189338 at https://home.web.cern.ch CERN celebrates 70 years of scientific discovery and innovation https://home.web.cern.ch/news/press-release/cern/cern-celebrates-70-years-scientific-discovery-and-innovation <span>CERN celebrates 70 years of scientific discovery and innovation</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p> </p> <p>Today CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, announced a programme to celebrate its 70th anniversary in 2024. This landmark year honours CERN's remarkable contributions to scientific knowledge, technological innovation and international collaboration in the field of particle physics. Throughout the year, a variety of events and activities will showcase the Laboratory’s rich past as well as its bright future.</p> <p>Leading up to an official high-level ceremony on 1 October, the preliminary anniversary programme, spanning the entire year, offers a rich array of events and activities, aimed at all types of audiences, at CERN and in the Organization’s Member States and Associate Member States and beyond. The <a href="https://indico.cern.ch/event/1360288/">first public event</a>, scheduled for 30 January, will combine science, art and culture, and will feature a panel of eminent scientists discussing the evolution of particle physics and CERN’s significant contributions in advancing this field. On 7 March and 18 April, special events will showcase the practical applications of high-energy physics research in everyday life. Mid-May will see a focus on the importance of global collaboration in scientific endeavours, while the events in June and July will explore the current unanswered questions in particle physics and the facilities being planned for future breakthroughs. From talks by distinguished scientists and exhibitions showing CERN’s cutting-edge research and the diversity of its science and its people, to public engagement initiatives worldwide, everyone will find something to enjoy in this programme.</p> <p>“CERN’s achievements over the 70 years of its history show what humanity can do when we put aside our differences and focus on the common good”, says Fabiola Gianotti, CERN Director-General. “Through the celebrations of CERN’s 70<sup>th</sup> anniversary, we will demonstrate how, over the past seven decades, CERN has been at the forefront of scientific knowledge and technological innovation, a model for training and education, collaboration and open science, and an inspiration for citizens around the world. This anniversary is also a great opportunity to look forward: CERN’s beautiful journey of exploration into the fundamental laws of nature and the constituents of matter is set to continue into the future with new, more powerful instruments and technologies.”</p> <p><a href="https://home.cern/about/who-we-are/our-history">CERN came to life in 1954</a>, in the aftermath of the Second World War, to bring excellence in scientific research back to Europe and to foster peaceful collaboration in fundamental research. This collective effort has pushed back the frontiers of human knowledge and of technology. As more powerful accelerators and experiments were built, foundational discoveries and innovations were made: among others, the multiwire proportional chamber was invented in 1968, the neutral currents were discovered in the 1970s, the <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/w-boson-sunshine-and-stardust">W</a> and <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/z-boson">Z</a> bosons were discovered in 1983, the precision measurement of the Z boson and of other parameters of the electroweak theory was made in the 1990s thanks to the <a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/large-electron-positron-collider">Large Electron Positron</a> (LEP) collider, the <a href="https://home.web.cern.ch/science/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">Large Hadron Collider</a> started up in 2009, and the <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/higgs-boson">Higgs boson</a> was discovered in 2012. CERN is also the birthplace of the <a href="https://home.web.cern.ch/topics/birth-web">World Wide Web</a> and has generated technologies that are used in other fields, including medical diagnostics and therapy and environmental protection.</p> <p>Today, CERN counts <a href="https://www.home.cern/about/who-we-are/our-governance/member-states">23 Member States</a>, 10 Associate Member States and a vibrant community of 17,000 people from all over the world, with more than 110 nationalities represented. Currently, the Laboratory is home to the Large Hadron Collider, the world’s most powerful particle accelerator. Building on its remarkable legacy of research and technological development, CERN is already looking to the future, in particular by studying the feasibility of a Future Circular Collider.</p> <p>“This anniversary year is for everyone and should engage and inspire scientists, policy makers and the public. We are looking forward to welcoming everyone at CERN for the many events being planned, but also to the celebrations in our Member States, Associate Member States and beyond”, says Luciano Musa, coordinator of the CERN 70<sup>th</sup> anniversary. “These international events are a testament to CERN's impact on scientific knowledge, technological development and worldwide collaboration.”</p> <p>CERN extends an invitation to everyone to take part in these inspiring events, which aim to kindle scientific curiosity, honour scientific progress and collaborative efforts, and underscore the role of science in society. Join us in this year of celebration as we honour our glorious past and shape a bright future for CERN and its community.</p> <p>For the complete CERN70 anniversary events and programme of activities, please visit: <a href="https://cern-70-wordpress.web.cern.ch/">cern.ch/cern70</a>.</p> <p>For more information, read our <a href="https://home.cern/science/cern/cern70-media-kit">media kit</a>.</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/139" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ssanchis</span></span> <span><time datetime="2024-01-24T11:41:10+01:00" title="Wednesday, January 24, 2024 - 11:41">Wed, 01/24/2024 - 11:41</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-01-25T13:30:04Z">Thu, 01/25/2024 - 14:30</time> </div> </div> Wed, 24 Jan 2024 10:41:10 +0000 ssanchis 189299 at https://home.web.cern.ch CERN software to become central hub for EU research https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/computing/cern-software-become-central-hub-eu-research <span>CERN software to become central hub for EU research</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><figure role="group" class="align-center"><img alt="White zenodo logo on a blue background" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="59940a78-d4da-48a3-8377-7f9dc86d9fd9" height="auto" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/ndinmore/zenodo-gradient-1000.png" width="1000" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>(Image: Zenodo)</figcaption></figure><p>What is the link between particle physics, the study of biodiversity and historical linguistics? The thirst for knowledge? Yes, but also the tool researchers are using to store all their findings and make them available to their peers: <a href="https://zenodo.org/communities">Zenodo</a>. For more than ten years, this CERN-born data repository has been evolving to store scientific data for ever more research communities and to adapt to the needs of more scientific disciplines. Notably, it was a key player in the COVID-19 response, <a href="https://home.cern/news/news/computing/open-science-against-covid-19-how-zenodo-and-openaire-support-scientists">providing a platform</a> for researchers to efficiently share results, data sets and software to help the international scientific community respond to the pandemic. Today, it is used by <a href="https://www.openaire.eu/zenodo-celebrating-our-10th-anniversary">more than 8000</a> research organisations worldwide.</p> <p>This success story is about to take an even more ambitious turn with a new project: <a href="https://about.zenodo.org/projects/horizon-zen/">HORIZON-ZEN</a>. Since its inception in June 2023, it has become the latest in a series of projects funded by the European Union to make the data collected by European research more findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable (FAIR). Since 2021, making research data as FAIR as possible has become a <a href="https://rea.ec.europa.eu/open-science_en">requirement</a> for all projects funded by the European Commission.</p> <p>What does it mean to make data FAIR in practice? Today, this is still difficult for researchers to navigate, because FAIR are generic principles rather than verifiable criteria. “With HORIZON-ZEN, we are striving to make being FAIR simpler and more streamlined for researchers, and we are working with scientific communities to tailor Zenodo for their specific domain,” explains Lars Holm Nielsen, Section Leader in Open Science Repositories in CERN’s IT department.</p> <figure role="group" class="align-left"><img alt="Screenshot of zenodo database" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="3aec17e9-b07a-4c7d-832f-1c028bfac0d1" height="auto" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/ndinmore/Zenodo_UI_0.png" width="2490" loading="lazy" /><figcaption>As part of the project, Zenodo will be updated with a bespoke “European Commission” user interface. (Image: CERN)</figcaption></figure><p>Zenodo was born out of the need for a simple, easy-to-use storage solution for all types of research output: papers, theses, presentations, protocols, images, videos, data sets, software, etc. Generally, Zenodo is the ideal tool for researchers without a dedicated research infrastructure, for communities with a large network of institutes or for small institutes that have the necessary knowledge but not the tools. “Zenodo is the brainchild of the EU's open science policy. The European Commission has high hopes for this service, which could eventually become one of the EU's main repositories for research data,” Nielsen continues.</p> <p>To make this possible, Nielsen and his team are putting a special, community-driven effort into the user experience, making it is easy for communities to customise their space, curate their content and build their online domain. “We are taking advantage of the 10 000 communities and the 300 currently running European-funded projects using Zenodo to co-design our tools. We encourage scientific communities to get a tailor-made Zenodo experience by becoming early adopters.”</p> <p>Zenodo owes its success to the scientific community’s confidence in CERN, to ten years of continuous support by the European Commission and to the remarkable services provided by the tool. Above all, it is the result of the hard work of a small team at CERN who are eager to maximise the impact of CERN technologies.</p> <hr /><div> <p>The HORIZON-ZEN project is funded by the European Union under Grant Agreement No. 101122956.</p> <p> </p> </div> <p> </p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/33989" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ndinmore</span></span> <span><time datetime="2024-01-23T09:49:22+01:00" title="Tuesday, January 23, 2024 - 09:49">Tue, 01/23/2024 - 09:49</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Byline</b></div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/authors/antoine-le-gall" hreflang="en">Antoine Le Gall</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-01-23T08:39:19Z">Tue, 01/23/2024 - 09:39</time> </div> </div> Tue, 23 Jan 2024 08:49:22 +0000 ndinmore 189288 at https://home.web.cern.ch BioDynaMo: cutting-edge software helps battle cancer https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/knowledge-sharing/biodynamo-cutting-edge-software-helps-battle-cancer <span>BioDynaMo: cutting-edge software helps battle cancer</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p style="line-height:1.38; margin-top:16px; margin-bottom:16px">Choosing the right cancer treatment is a massive undertaking involving multiple stages, high experimental complexity and significant costs. Currently, two main methods are used to find the best possible treatment solutions: in vitro testing and clinical trials. However, predicting the drug effects on each individual patient remains the Holy Grail of personalised medicine.</p> <p>Born from <a href="https://openlab.cern/">CERN openlab</a> in the CERN IT department, <a href="https://www.biodynamo.org/">BioDynaMo</a> is an innovative tool for “in silico” testing, i.e. experimentation carried out on a computer. Based on mathematical models, it creates and runs complex 3D computer simulations that help understand cancer progression and identify the most effective treatment strategies for specific tumour cases.</p> <p><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0045782523006904">In a recent scientific publication</a>, scientists affiliated with CERN, the Technical University of Munich and the University of Texas at Austin demonstrated the significant potential of advancing medical therapy with the help of BioDynaMo. The model successfully replicates medical data on recorded tumour growth and the effects of two anti-cancer drugs, Doxorubicin and Trastuzumab. By fitting the BioDynaMo models to the available pre-clinical data, scientists proved the platform’s ability to simulate different levels of efficacy of various drugs, treatment combinations and dosage regimens.</p> <p>BioDynaMo is an open source project that strives to provide the most efficient and performant simulation platform for <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agent-based_model">agent-based models</a>. It accommodates a diverse range of use cases and can address research questions in oncology, neuroscience, epidemiology and many more disciplines. With its ability to simulate almost two billion agents (or cells), BioDynaMo is a powerful tool for analysing many different complex systems. Since 2015, BioDynaMo's consortium of scientists has been working on developing and optimising the engine, improving its performance and usability. For more information, click <a href="https://academic.oup.com/bioinformatics/article/38/2/453/6371176">here</a>.</p> <p>BioDynaMo's inception was funded with the support of CERN’s <a data-auth="NotApplicable" data-linkindex="0" data-ogsc="" href="https://kt.cern/funding/ma-budget" id="OWA4f232605-2f65-46a6-211e-82bfc37b9e8c" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">budget for knowledge transfer for the benefit of medical applications</a> and the project continues to be supported by the <a data-auth="NotApplicable" data-linkindex="1" data-ogsc="" href="https://cernandsocietyfoundation.cern/projects/biodynamo" id="OWA75c6b78d-88aa-ee61-4edb-178a96c54fe4" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">CERN and Society Foundation</a>. Find out how you can support the BioDynaMo project <a data-auth="NotApplicable" data-linkindex="2" data-ogsc="" href="https://www.biodynamo.org/contacts-us/support-biodynamo" id="OWA59b392a9-16f2-ad62-e32d-a6515a54b506" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/33989" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ndinmore</span></span> <span><time datetime="2024-01-16T11:54:16+01:00" title="Tuesday, January 16, 2024 - 11:54">Tue, 01/16/2024 - 11:54</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Byline</b></div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/authors/marina-banjac" hreflang="en">Marina Banjac</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-01-16T10:43:01Z">Tue, 01/16/2024 - 11:43</time> </div> </div> Tue, 16 Jan 2024 10:54:16 +0000 ndinmore 189235 at https://home.web.cern.ch LHCb experiment releases all of its Run 1 proton–proton data https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/experiments/lhcb-experiment-releases-all-its-run-1-proton-proton-data <span>LHCb experiment releases all of its Run 1 proton–proton data</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p style="margin-bottom:20px">At the end of December 2023, the <a href="/science/experiments/lhcb">LHCb</a> experiment <a href="https://lhcb-outreach.web.cern.ch/2023/12/20/lhcb-releases-the-entire-run-i-dataset/#_msocom_1">released</a> all its data from Run 1 of the Large Hadron Collider. This data, collected by the experiment in 2011 and 2012, contains approximately 800 terabytes of information obtained from proton–proton collisions. The data has been made available in a pre-filtered format, suitable for a wide range of physics studies for research and education purposes. </p> <p>LHCb data across Runs 1 and 2 has already been used for over 700 scientific publications, including <a href="https://home.cern/news?title=&amp;topic=1113&amp;type=All&amp;audience=All&amp;tid_3=LHCb+%28125%29&amp;date_from=&amp;date_to=">numerous</a> significant findings. All results from the collaboration have already been made publicly accessible in<a href="https://lhcbproject.web.cern.ch/Publications/LHCbProjectPublic/Summary_all.html"> open-access papers</a> and the numerical results from the graphs can be consulted in the <a href="https://www.hepdata.net/search/?q=&amp;collaboration=LHCb">HEPData</a> database. With the new release, the data used by the researchers to produce these results is now accessible. The data has been released in the framework of CERN’s<a href="http://opendata.cern.ch/docs/cern-open-data-policy-for-lhc-experiments"> Open Data Policy</a>, which reflects values that have been enshrined in the CERN Convention for more than sixty years and applies to all of CERN’s activities.</p> <p>The collaboration has pre-processed the data by reconstructing experimental signatures, such as the trajectories of charged particles, from the raw information delivered by the <a href="https://lhcb-outreach.web.cern.ch/detector/">complex detector system</a>. The data is filtered, classified according to a large number of processes and decays, and made available in the same format that is used internally by LHCb physicists. The data can be downloaded from the CERN<a href="http://opendata.cern.ch/search?page=1&amp;size=20&amp;experiment=LHCb&amp;subtype=Collision&amp;type=Dataset"> Open Data portal</a>.</p> <p>To aid the user’s understanding, the samples come with extensive documentation and metadata, as well as a glossary explaining several hundred specialised terms used in the pre-processing. The data can be analysed using dedicated LHCb algorithms, which are <a href="https://lhcb.github.io/starterkit/">available</a> as open-source software.</p> <p>All data sets have digital identifiers (DOIs) for reference and citation. The experiment also welcomes feedback on how the data is used and invites users to discuss and post questions in the CERN <a href="https://opendata-forum.cern.ch/c/lhcb/">Open Data Forum</a>.</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/33989" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ndinmore</span></span> <span><time datetime="2024-01-11T11:28:29+01:00" title="Thursday, January 11, 2024 - 11:28">Thu, 01/11/2024 - 11:28</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Byline</b></div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/authors/lhcb-collaboration" hreflang="en">LHCb collaboration</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-01-11T10:21:40Z">Thu, 01/11/2024 - 11:21</time> </div> </div> Thu, 11 Jan 2024 10:28:29 +0000 ndinmore 189210 at https://home.web.cern.ch A year to celebrate CERN’s 70th anniversary https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/cern/year-celebrate-cerns-70th-anniversary <span>A year to celebrate CERN’s 70th anniversary</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="415" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/p_olVEYpkY8?si=wZwLd9P6DDEuTzbk" title="YouTube video player" width="560"></iframe><em>CERN wishes you a happy 2024 as we look forward to a year of celebrations for CERN’s 70th anniversary</em></p> <p style="margin-top:8px; margin-right:-13px"><strong>Happy 2024 from CERN! </strong></p> <p>In 2024, CERN is celebrating its 70th anniversary. Throughout the year, events and activities will showcase the Laboratory’s rich past, as well as its bright future with a unique accelerator complex set to drive 70 more years of research into what the Universe is made of and how it works.</p> <p>With the full programme of events soon to be announced, join us for the first event, Unveiling the Universe, on <strong>30 January</strong> in <a href="https://visit.cern/science-gateway">CERN Science Gateway</a>. This event will combine science, art and culture, looking back on CERN’s 70 years of scientific discoveries and looking forward to how many mysteries of the Universe are still to be understood.</p> <p style="margin-top:8px; margin-right:-13px"><img alt="Poster of 30 January event" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="b1b82579-3450-424d-9484-8a4efff7f02a" height="auto" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/katebrad/Poster%20art%20and%20science%20summit1-min.png" class="align-right" width="842" loading="lazy" />Physicists and artists will explore human creativity, curiosity, imagination and inspiration, looking at how we have built and will continue to build knowledge and understanding of the big questions about the Universe: from the first billionth of a second after the Big Bang to the invisible “dark” Universe.</p> <p>The day will begin with the inaugural CERN Art and Science Summit. Renowned artists and scientists will delve into the challenges and opportunities of engagement between art and science. The summit will highlight the achievements of CERN’s forward-thinking approach to arts and creativity through the <a href="https://arts.cern/">Arts at CERN</a> programme.</p> <p>The evening will be one of conversations with distinguished scientists of different generations – David Gross, Djuna Croon, Gian Francesco Giudice and Tara Shears – exploring the development of knowledge in particle physics and CERN’s contributions to these developments.</p> <p>All this will be interspersed with a visit to the art-based <a href="https://arts.cern/article/cern-science-gateway-opens-art-exhibition-exploring-unknown">Exploring the Unknown</a> exhibition in CERN Science Gateway, and the evening will be rounded off with Enigma, a visual and audio performance.</p> <p>For more information and to register, please follow this <a href="https://indico.cern.ch/event/1360288/">link</a>.</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/33989" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ndinmore</span></span> <span><time datetime="2023-12-21T15:56:49+01:00" title="Thursday, December 21, 2023 - 15:56">Thu, 12/21/2023 - 15:56</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2024-01-08T13:56:00Z">Mon, 01/08/2024 - 14:56</time> </div> </div> Thu, 21 Dec 2023 14:56:49 +0000 ndinmore 189169 at https://home.web.cern.ch CERN highlights in 2023 https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/cern/cern-highlights-2023 <span>CERN highlights in 2023</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In 2023, CERN celebrated a year of achievements on its journey of scientific exploration. The <a href="/news/press-release/cern/cern-inaugurates-science-gateway-its-new-outreach-centre-science-education">inauguration of CERN Science Gateway</a>, an emblematic education and outreach centre, reflected CERN's commitment to inspiring future generations.</p> <p>Precision measurements took centre stage as the ATLAS experiment set records in studying the <a href="/news/news/physics/atlas-sets-record-precision-higgs-bosons-mass">Higgs boson mass</a> and the <a href="/news/news/physics/atlas-measures-strength-strong-force-record-precision">strong force strength</a>. The CMS experiment presented its search for <a href="/news/news/physics/cms-collaboration-cern-presents-its-latest-search-new-exotic-particles">dark photons</a> and other exotic particles and measured <a href="https://cerncourier.com/a/%CF%84-lepton-polarisation-measured-in-z-boson-decays/">tau-lepton polarisation in Z-boson decays</a>. The ALICE experiment shone <a href="/news/news/physics/alice-shines-light-nucleus-probe-its-structure">light on the nucleus</a> by probing its intricate structure and on <a href="/news/news/physics/charm-better-beauty-going-flow">charm and beauty quark dynamics in quark–gluon plasma</a>. The LHCb experiment made the <a href="/news/news/physics/lhcb-tightens-precision-key-measurements-matter-antimatter-asymmetry">most precise measurement</a> yet of matter–antimatter asymmetry with beauty quarks and <a href="/news/news/physics/lhcb-observes-hypertriton-production-proton-proton-collisions-lhc">observed hypertriton, a key to modelling neutron star cores</a>.</p> <p><a href="/news/news/experiments/lhc-lead-ion-collision-run-starts">Lead ions</a> collided in the Large Hadron Collider for the first time in five years and <a href="/news/news/physics/new-lhc-experiments-enter-uncharted-territory">collider neutrinos were observed for the first time</a> by FASER and SND@LHC. To prepare for the future, the <a href="/science/accelerators/high-luminosity-lhc">High-Luminosity LHC</a> team completed and validated key hardware components, underground structures and services. From observing <a href="/news/press-release/physics/alpha-experiment-cern-observes-influence-gravity-antimatter">antimatter’s fall under gravity</a> to advancements in <a href="/news/news/physics/isolde-takes-solid-tick-forward-towards-nuclear-clock">atomic clock precision</a> and <a href="/news/news/experiments/dark-boson-searches-cerns-north-area">probing dark matter searches</a>, CERN's diverse experiments underlined the Laboratory’s key role in shaping the future of particle physics and our understanding of the Universe.</p> <p>CERN celebrated the <a href="/news/news/knowledge-sharing/cern-and-nasa-join-forces-commit-research-future-open-and-accessible">Year of Open Science with NASA</a> and other scientific institutions and collaborated with the <a href="/news/news/computing/icrc-and-cern-cooperate-rd-technologies-humanitarian-action">International Committee of the Red Cross</a> and the <a href="/news/news/computing/cern-and-world-food-programme-sign-memorandum-cooperation">World Food Programme</a> to use its technologies for humanitarian action and fighting hunger. CERN’s impact reached far beyond the Laboratory with initiatives such as exploring superconductivity <a href="/news/news/knowledge-sharing/supernode-and-cern-collaborate-new-solutions-renewable-energy">solutions for renewable energy transmission</a> with SuperNode, <a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2860870">moving forward with the demonstrator</a> for low-carbon aviation with Airbus and accelerating deep-tech startups with <a href="/news/news/knowledge-sharing/journey-cern-entrepreneurship">CERN Venture Connect</a>.</p> <p><a href="/news/news/cern/host-state-presidents-visit-cern">Host State presidents</a> Emmanuel Macron and Alain Berset also visited CERN this year.</p> <p>Watch CERN in 2023 and enjoy a visual journey through some of the many highlights of the year, immersing yourself in groundbreaking achievements and scientific wonders.</p> <p><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="380" src="https://videos.cern.ch/video/CERN-VIDEO-2023-033-001" width="560"></iframe></p> <p> </p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/24416" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ckrishna</span></span> <span><time datetime="2023-12-20T18:15:39+01:00" title="Wednesday, December 20, 2023 - 18:15">Wed, 12/20/2023 - 18:15</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Byline</b></div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/authors/chetna-krishna" hreflang="en">Chetna Krishna</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2023-12-22T09:00:00Z">Fri, 12/22/2023 - 10:00</time> </div> </div> Wed, 20 Dec 2023 17:15:39 +0000 ckrishna 189163 at https://home.web.cern.ch Watch: Music and physics: a spacetime voyage back to our origins, with Yo-Yo Ma and Fabiola Gianotti https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/cern/watch-music-and-physics-spacetime-voyage-back-our-origins-yo-yo-ma-and-fabiola <span>Watch: Music and physics: a spacetime voyage back to our origins, with Yo-Yo Ma and Fabiola Gianotti</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" id="CERN-PHOTO-202312-294-235"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202312-294-235" title="View on CDS"><img alt="" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202312-294-235/file?size=large" /></a><figcaption>CERN's Director General, Fabiola Gianotti (left) with renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma (right).<span> (Image: CERN)</span></figcaption></figure><p>From creativity to curiosity and the wish to explore the unknown, physics and music are intrinsically linked. For one special evening held at CERN Science Gateway, world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma and CERN physicist and Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti, discussed the commonalities and relations between physics and music and the human experiences of both.</p> <p>The duo musically demonstrated concepts such as the mystery of dark matter, symmetries, complexity built upon simplicity, with Ma on the cello and Gianotti on the piano. Together, they played Franz Schubert’s <em>Arpeggione</em> Sonata, while a recording of Debussy’s <em>La Cathédrale Engloutie</em> accompanied striking images of the CERN experiments. To close the evening, Ma played a contemplative performance of Arvo Pärt’s <em>Spiegel im Spiegel</em>.</p> <p>Watch highlights of the evening by clicking on the link below.</p> <p><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="415" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/B3f9dv7kP-I?si=FHEJEWL8JluLTuJD" title="YouTube video player" width="560"></iframe></p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/33989" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ndinmore</span></span> <span><time datetime="2023-12-21T10:36:32+01:00" title="Thursday, December 21, 2023 - 10:36">Thu, 12/21/2023 - 10:36</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2023-12-22T08:54:20Z">Fri, 12/22/2023 - 09:54</time> </div> </div> Thu, 21 Dec 2023 09:36:32 +0000 ndinmore 189168 at https://home.web.cern.ch Shaping future quantum techniques in machine learning at CERN https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/computing/shaping-future-quantum-techniques-machine-learning-cern <span>Shaping future quantum techniques in machine learning at CERN</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" id="CERN-PHOTO-202311-275-50"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202311-275-50" title="View on CDS"><img alt="computing" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202311-275-50/file?size=large" /></a><figcaption>Natalia Ares from the University of Oxford presents machine learning for tackling quantum device variability at the 7th International Conference on Quantum Techniques in Machine Learning, held at CERN in November. More than 300 people attended in person, with more following online.<span> (Image: CERN)</span></figcaption></figure><p>Problem solving gets faster if quantum methodologies are used instead of classical computers. Physicists and computer scientists are therefore working closely together to explore this potential. In November, the <a href="https://qtml-2023.web.cern.ch/">7th International Conference on Quantum Techniques in Machine Learning</a> (QTML) was held at CERN, bringing together more than 300 researchers and industry partners in the field.</p> <p>Machine learning uses data and algorithms to help computers to learn patterns and perform more effectively at tasks ranging from helping doctors to diagnose cancer to improving facial recognition. Combining techniques from quantum physics with machine learning can reduce the number of steps needed for algorithms to obtain a correct answer.</p> <p>“CERN is putting significant effort into developing quantum technology for particle physics and beyond, through the Quantum Technology Initiative and the Open Quantum Institute,” explained Alberto di Meglio, head of the Innovation section in CERN’s IT department, in his opening speech. As well as talks from researchers, organisations and companies showcased their latest developments, with talks from ESA, Google, IBM, Intel, IONQ, NASA and PASQAL. Applications ranged from optimising aircraft cargo loading to developing new algorithms to study lithium compounds and their chemical reactions in battery chemistry. “The presence of major industry partners was a key element of the conference,” confirms Michele Grossi, senior fellow in quantum computing and algorithms at CERN. “The continuous interaction between industry and academia is helping the community to drive the quantum revolution in a fair way.”</p> <p>The conference was organised without parallel sessions, which divide participants, enabling researchers from various fields to interact. “This conference allowed more than 300 people to gather each day to exchange around one focused theme,” says Miguel Marquina, senior staff member in CERN’s IT department. “It is powerful to experience such an engaging environment.”</p> <p>The 8th edition of the International Conference on Quantum Techniques in Machine Learning will take place in 2024 at the University of Melbourne. More information can be found on the <a href="https://qtml-2023.web.cern.ch/">QTML 2023</a> and <a href="https://quantum.cern/">QTI</a> websites.</p> <figure class="cds-image" id="CERN-PHOTO-202311-275-1"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202311-275-1" title="View on CDS"><img alt="computing" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-202311-275-1/file?size=large" /></a> <figcaption>Attendees of the 7th International Conference on Quantum Techniques in Machine Learning, held at CERN. <span> (Image: CERN)</span></figcaption></figure></div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/40" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">katebrad</span></span> <span><time datetime="2023-12-20T10:43:18+01:00" title="Wednesday, December 20, 2023 - 10:43">Wed, 12/20/2023 - 10:43</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Byline</b></div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/authors/mariana-velho" hreflang="en">Mariana Velho</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2023-12-20T09:59:00Z">Wed, 12/20/2023 - 10:59</time> </div> </div> Wed, 20 Dec 2023 09:43:18 +0000 katebrad 189157 at https://home.web.cern.ch Hi-Lumi News: First magnet from the US Accelerator Upgrade Project shipped to CERN https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/accelerators/hi-lumi-news-first-magnet-us-accelerator-upgrade-project-shipped-cern <span>Hi-Lumi News: First magnet from the US Accelerator Upgrade Project shipped to CERN</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" id="OPEN-PHO-ACCEL-2023-036-2"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/OPEN-PHO-ACCEL-2023-036-2" title="View on CDS"><img alt="LHC,HL-LHC,High-Luminosity LHC,magnet,accelerator,technology,collaboration,Accelerators" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/OPEN-PHO-ACCEL-2023-036-2/file?size=large" /></a><figcaption>The cryo-assembly containing two MQXFA magnets was delivered to CERN in early December.<span> (Image: CERN)</span></figcaption></figure><p>At the beginning of December, CERN received an important shipment. It contained a cryo-assembly of two 4.2-m-long magnets developed by the Accelerator Upgrade Project in the US. These magnets are vital for the high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC). With coils made from niobium–tin, instead of the niobium–titanium that the LHC currently uses, they will help focus the particle beams to an even smaller spot size at the interaction points of the ATLAS and CMS experiments.</p> <p>This is the first of ten cryo-assemblies that will make the month-long journey from the US. A celebration was held at CERN on Monday, 18 December to commemorate this milestone, bringing people from both sides of the Atlantic together. “In the realm of large scientific endeavours like the HL-LHC, global collaboration and expertise play pivotal roles. The delivery of the first cryo-assembly housing fully validated niobium–tin series magnets is a tangible testament to the success of the US Accelerator Upgrade Project,” says Mike Lamont, CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology. “This event not only marks a crucial milestone in our collaboration with our US partners, but also celebrates the outstanding contributions shaping the future landscape of particle physics at CERN.”</p> <p>These cryo-assemblies from the US will be used in conjunction with the <a href="https://home.cern/news/news/accelerators/hilumi-news-successful-test-paves-way-magnet-production-cern">7.2-m-long magnets of the same design</a> developed at CERN for the HL-LHC. Both types of magnet are to be installed in the <a href="https://acceleratingnews.web.cern.ch/news/issue-40/high-luminosity-lhc-hl-lhc/hl-lhcs-it-string-home-gets-ready">inner-triplet (IT) string</a>, a facility at CERN built to test all the components that will comprise the interaction regions at ATLAS and CMS.</p> <p>“With this arrival, five out of the six cryomagnets for the IT string are now at CERN ready for testing,” says Ezio Todesco, who is in charge of the HL-LHC interaction region magnets. “The string will take on good colours in 2024.”</p> <p>“This first cold-mass assembly will go into the IT string and will be extensively tested throughout 2025,” says Oliver Brüning, HL-LHC project leader. “This marks the start of a new phase of the CERN-US collaboration: the delivery of final cryo-assemblies ready for installation in the LHC.”</p> <p>Giorgio Apollinari, Project Director of the HL-LHC AUP, is looking forward to this next phase of the project. “We have been building these magnets in the US for the last five years and have now completed 75% of their production,” he said. “We’ve sent the first two magnets in a final cryo-assembly after extensive tests in the US and are already putting together the next cryo-assembly, scheduled to arrive at CERN by early 2024.”</p> <p>Watch a timelapse of the magnet unboxing at CERN below.</p> <p><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="400" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/st-wb7GNH4c?si=pou90gi8zgdmWOax" title="YouTube video player" width="560"></iframe></p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/33989" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">ndinmore</span></span> <span><time datetime="2023-12-18T16:24:25+01:00" title="Monday, December 18, 2023 - 16:24">Mon, 12/18/2023 - 16:24</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Byline</b></div> <div class="field--items"> <div class="field--item"><a href="/authors/naomi-dinmore" hreflang="en">Naomi Dinmore</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2023-12-18T15:12:39Z">Mon, 12/18/2023 - 16:12</time> </div> </div> Mon, 18 Dec 2023 15:24:25 +0000 ndinmore 189145 at https://home.web.cern.ch CERN Council decides to conclude cooperation with Russia and Belarus in 2024 https://home.web.cern.ch/news/news/cern/cern-council-decides-conclude-cooperation-russia-and-belarus-2024 <span>CERN Council decides to conclude cooperation with Russia and Belarus in 2024</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Following a decision taken by the CERN Council today, the Organization’s cooperation with the Russian Federation and the Republic of Belarus will conclude at the expiry in 2024 of the International Cooperation Agreements (ICAs) with the two countries. This decision was taken following the <a href="https://home.cern/news/news/cern/cern-council-cooperation-agreements-russia-belarus">Council’s June 2022 decisions</a>.</p> <p>International Cooperation Agreements with the Organization normally run for five years, and are tacitly renewed for the same period unless written notice is provided by one party to the other at least six months prior to expiration. </p> <p>The cooperation will come to an end on 27 June 2024 for the Republic of Belarus and on 30 November 2024 for the Russian Federation. All relations between CERN and Russian and Belarusian institutions will cease as of these dates. Relations continue with scientists of Russian or Belarusian nationality otherwise affiliated with CERN.</p> <p>The Council reaffirmed that all the decisions it has taken to date in light of the ongoing military invasion of Ukraine by the Russian Federation with the involvement of the Republic of Belarus, along with the actions undertaken by the CERN Management, remain in force. These include measures adopted at the extraordinary meeting of the Council on <a href="https://home.cern/news/news/cern/cern-council-responds-russian-invasion-ukraine">8 March 2022</a>, and at the Council’s regular meetings on <a href="https://home.cern/news/news/cern/cern-council-takes-further-measures-response-invasion-ukraine">25 March 2022</a> and 16 June 2022.</p> <p>The full text of the Council’s resolutions can be found <a href="https://council.web.cern.ch/en/content/resolutions">here</a></p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/31077" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">angerard</span></span> <span><time datetime="2023-12-15T12:06:18+01:00" title="Friday, December 15, 2023 - 12:06">Fri, 12/15/2023 - 12:06</time> </span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-pub-date field--type-datetime field--label-above"> <div class="field--label"><b>Publication Date</b></div> <div class="field--item"><time datetime="2023-12-15T11:06:00Z">Fri, 12/15/2023 - 12:06</time> </div> </div> Fri, 15 Dec 2023 11:06:18 +0000 angerard 189134 at https://home.web.cern.ch