News for general public feed https://home.cern/cern-community/news/rss en A different sound in the LHC tunnel https://home.cern/news/news/cern/different-sound-lhc-tunnel <span>A different sound in the LHC tunnel</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/7476" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">camonnin</span></span> <span>Wed, 09/18/2019 - 09:44</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>On a recent visit to CERN, the world-famous cellist, Yo-Yo Ma played in a unique music hall – 100 metres underground in the tunnel of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).</p> <p>This video shows Yo-Yo Ma playing the Prélude from Bach’s Cello Suite No. 6 in D Major.</p> <p><em>"</em>I have always thought that philosophy, arts, and sciences belong together as equal partners in this thing we call culture,” explained Yo-Yo Ma. “We must fight for this belief. Because the widening gaps between disciplines of inquiry and between culture, economics, and politics have led to increasing and frightening fractures in the world."</p> <p>Speaking after the performance, CERN’s Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti said “It was a great moment of music in a very special place, and an occasion to underline the deep links between art and science”.   </p> <figure><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lTjJXlwxhIA" width="560"></iframe> <figcaption>A different sound in the LHC tunnel – the world-famous cellist, Yo-Yo Ma played in this unique music hall. (Video: CERN)</figcaption></figure></div> Wed, 18 Sep 2019 07:44:34 +0000 camonnin 12079 at https://home.cern LS2 Report: CMS set to glitter with installation of new GEMs https://home.cern/news/news/experiments/ls2-report-cms-set-glitter-installation-new-gems <span>LS2 Report: CMS set to glitter with installation of new GEMs</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Achintya Rao</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">achintya</span></span> <span>Tue, 09/17/2019 - 12:22</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2684028" data-filename="201906-204_04" id="CERN-PHOTO-201907-204-4"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201907-204-4" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="GEMS muon detectors installation in the cavern" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201907-204-4/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Installation in the CMS detector <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Muons – heavy, weakly interacting particles – zip past the inner layers of the <a href="/science/experiments/compact-muon-solenoid">Compact Muon Solenoid</a> (CMS), after being produced in collisions by the <a href="/science/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">Large Hadron Collider</a> (LHC). They are observed using special detectors placed on the periphery of the cylindrical device, where they are the particles most likely to register a signal. Although CMS, as the name suggests, was designed with the ability to observe with high precision nearly every muon produced within it, it will become more challenging to do so in a few years’ time. The <a href="/science/accelerators/high-luminosity-lhc">High-Luminosity LHC</a> (HL-LHC) will begin operations in 2026, providing on average over five times more simultaneous proton–proton collisions than before. Various components of CMS, including the muon system, are being upgraded during the ongoing <a href="/tags/long-shutdown-2">second long shutdown</a> (LS2) of CERN’s accelerator complex, in order to cope with the HL-LHC’s higher data rates.</p> <p>Muon detectors contain different mixtures of gases that get ionised when high-energy muons fly through them, providing information about where the muon was at a given instant. The CMS muon system has so far used three different types of detectors: Drift Tubes (DT), Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) and Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC). Around a decade ago, at about the time that CMS began collecting LHC collision data, it was decided to build a completely new type of detector called Gas Electron Multipliers, or GEM, to improve the muon-detection abilities of CMS in the HL-LHC era. After extensive R&amp;D, the first GEMs were assembled and tested at CERN’s Prévessin site in a dedicated fabrication facility. In July, two of 72 so-called “superchambers” of GEMs were transported carefully to Point 5 and installed within CMS. Each superchamber had a bottle of gas strapped on top of it on the trolley so the detector could keep “breathing” the inert air. The remaining 70 superchambers will be installed later in LS2.</p> <p>“<a href="/news/news/experiments/cms-tightens-its-net-around-muons">The GEMs are new technology for CMS</a> and Run 3 of the LHC will give us the opportunity to evaluate their performance,” says Archana Sharma, who has led the CMS-GEM team since 2009. “Of course,” she continues, “it’s not only there to be tested. The first GEMs will work with the existing CSCs to provide valuable triggering information to select the most interesting collision events.” Two more GEM stations with 288 and 216 modules respectively will be definitively installed in the coming years, in time for the HL-LHC.</p> <p>The muon-system team have been busy upgrading the electronics of the 180 CSCs located closest to the beam line to prepare for the HL-LHC. “We have already removed, refurbished and reinstalled 54 CSCs this year,” notes Anna Colaleo, CMS muon-system manager. “Work on replacing the electronics for another batch of CSCs is in progress and we plan on completing this endeavour by the summer of 2020.”</p> <figure><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="400" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/AJnlf8eZZRc?rel=0" width="560"></iframe> <figcaption>A timelapse showing the extraction of CSCs from the CMS endcap and their transport to the refurbishment area on the surface (Video: CMS/CERN)</figcaption></figure><p>CMS is also performing critical maintenance on the rest of the muon detectors during LS2. As expected, over the course of several years of operation, some components of these detectors have deteriorated slightly. The RPCs have been made more airtight to reduce gas leaks, while both DTs and RPCs have had some broken components replaced. In addition, neutron shielding is being added to the top of the DTs located in the central barrel to protect CMS from the neutron background caused by the particle beam interacting with the beam pipe.</p> <p>With nearly a year and a half of LS2 left, the CMS experiment site at LHC Point 5 continues to be a hub of activity as the collaboration prepares for the LHC’s Run 3 and beyond.</p> <p>More photos of the GEMs installation <a class="bulletin" href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2684028">on CDS</a></p> <p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="400" scrolling="no" src="https://cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201907-204/export?format=sspp&amp;ln=en&amp;captions=true" width="480"></iframe></p> </div> Tue, 17 Sep 2019 10:22:41 +0000 achintya 12074 at https://home.cern Journées portes ouvertes, la passion en partage https://home.cern/fr/news/news/cern/infectious-enthusiasm-open-days <span>Infectious enthusiasm at the Open Days</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/146" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cmenard</span></span> <span>Mon, 09/16/2019 - 14:55</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Admire technological wonders 100 metres underground, drive cranes, play with miniature accelerators, operate robots, discover a multitude of technologies and immerse yourself in the enigmas of the Universe... you were some 75 000 visitors this weekend participating in CERN's <a href="https://opendays.cern/">Open Days</a>.</p> <figure><figure class="cds-image" id="CERN-PHOTO-201909-239-54"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201909-239-54" title="View on CDS"><img alt="open days" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201909-239-54/file?size=large" /></a> <figcaption>An exceptional opportunity to visit the Large Hadron Collider tunnel. (Image: Maximilien Brice and Julien Ordan)</figcaption></figure><p>Two days of discoveries and meetings led by nearly 3000 volunteers from CERN, its institutes and contracting companies. Enthusiastic volunteers, delighted to share their passion, knowledge and expertise.</p> <figure><figure class="cds-image" id="CERN-PHOTO-201909-239-53"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201909-239-53" title="View on CDS"><img alt="open days" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201909-239-53/file?size=large" /></a> <figcaption>Two young visitors overwhelmed by the magnificent CMS detector, completely open for the occasion. (Image: Maximilien Brice and Julien Ordan/CERN) <p> </p> </figcaption></figure><p>Some 160 visit points were open, with hundreds of activities at nine sites on both sides of the border. An immense event to relive in images.</p> <p> </p> <figure><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="360" scrolling="no" src="https://cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201909-239/export?format=sspp&amp;ln=en&amp;captions=true" width="480"></iframe> <figcaption><a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2689590">Images</a>: Maximilien Brice, Anna Chrul, Samuel Hertzog, Julien Ordan, Fons Rademakers and Didier Steyaert</figcaption></figure></figure></figure></div> Mon, 16 Sep 2019 12:36:01 +0000 cmenard 12069 at https://home.cern Artificial intelligence: the only way is ethics https://home.cern/news/news/computing/artificial-intelligence-only-way-ethics <span>Artificial intelligence: the only way is ethics</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Andrew Purcell</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">achintya</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/30/2019 - 15:05</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2688051" data-filename="1" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-103-1"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-103-1" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Vivek Nallur speaking at CERN about ethics in AI" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-103-1/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Vivek Nallur is an assistant professor at University College Dublin <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>CERN has an ambitious upgrade programme for its <a href="/science/accelerators/accelerator-complex">flagship accelerator complex</a> over the next two decades. This is vital to continue pushing back the frontiers of knowledge in fundamental physics, but it also poses <a href="https://openlab.cern/whitepaper">some gargantuan computing challenges</a>.</p> <p>One of the potential ways to address some of these challenges is to make use of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies. Such technologies could, for example, play a role in filtering through hundreds of millions of particle collision events each second to select interesting ones for further study. Or they could be used to help spot patterns in monitoring data from industrial control systems and prevent faults before they even arise. Already today, machine-learning approaches are being applied to these areas.</p> <p>It was in view of the potential for further important developments in this area that <a href="https://people.ucd.ie/vivek.nallur">Vivek Nallur</a> was invited to give a talk last week at CERN entitled ‘<a href="https://indico.cern.ch/event/837519/">Intelligence and Ethics in Machines – Utopia or Dystopia?</a>’.</p> <p>Nallur is an assistant professor at <a href="https://www.ucd.ie/collegesandschools/science/computerscience/">the School of Computer Science at University College Dublin in Ireland</a>. He gave an overview of how AI technologies are being used in wider society today and highlighted many of the limitations of current systems. In particular, Nallur discussed challenges related to the verification and validation of decisions made, the problems surrounding implicit bias, and the difficulties of actually encoding ethical principles.</p> <p>During his talk, Nallur provided an overview of the main efforts undertaken to date to create AI systems with a universal sense of ethics. In particular, he discussed systems based on consequentialist ethics, virtue ethics and deontological ethics – highlighting how these can throw up wildly different behaviours. Therefore, instead of aiming for universal ethics, Nallur champions an approach based on domain-specific ethics, with the goal of achieving an AI system that can act ethically in a specific field. He believes the best way to achieve this is by using games to represent certain multi-agent situations, thus allowing ethics to emerge through agreement based on socio-evolutionary mechanisms – as in human societies. Essentially, he wants AI agents to play games together again and again until they can agree on what actions should or shouldn’t be taken in given circumstances.</p> <p>“We shouldn’t try to jump from no ethics in AI to universal ethics; let’s take it step by step,” says Nallur. “To start, we should aim to have systems that work and can have liberty within specific domains. To achieve this, we will need intense and fundamental collaboration between computer scientists, domain experts and legal professionals.”</p> <p>Nallur was invited to speak at CERN by <a href="https://openlab.cern/">CERN openlab</a>, which is running <a href="https://openlab.cern/our-work">a number of R&amp;D projects related to AI technologies</a> with its industry and research collaborators. “Naturally, CERN doesn’t have to deal with the kind of ethical quandaries that those using AI in a medical or law-enforcement context face,” says Alberto Di Meglio, head of CERN openlab. “However, it would be a mistake to dismiss this as simply an interesting philosophical exercise in the context of particle physics. Here at CERN, we are proud that tools and techniques we develop are often adopted for use by other communities – within both research and industry. As such, it is important to think about ethical considerations related to AI technologies from a very early stage.” He continues: “I hope that this fascinating talk will serve to ignite further discussion within our community.”</p> <hr /><p><em><a class="bulletin" href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2687725">Nallur’s talk</a> is available to watch in full</em></p> <p><em><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="lecture" frameborder="0" height="600px" scrolling="no" src="https://mediastream.cern.ch/MediaArchive/Video/Public2/weblecture-player/index.html?year=2019&amp;lecture=837519c1" width="1020px"></iframe> </em></p> </div> Fri, 30 Aug 2019 13:05:24 +0000 achintya 11967 at https://home.cern La haute luminosité s’installe dans le tunnel https://home.cern/fr/news/news/accelerators/installing-high-luminosity-tunnel <span>Installing high luminosity in the tunnel</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Corinne Pralavorio</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/146" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">cmenard</span></span> <span>Wed, 09/04/2019 - 10:51</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>The component concerned, known as a TANB, is the first definitive component of the <a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/high-luminosity-lhc">High-Luminosity LHC</a> to be installed in the Large Hadron Collider tunnel. An inauguration ceremony on Friday, 30 August, marked the arrival of this piece of equipment for the future collider.</p> <p>The High-Luminosity LHC, which will be commissioned in 2026, will boost the performance of the current accelerator by substantially increasing the number of collisions in the experiments. Luminosity, which corresponds to the number of potential collisions per second per surface unit, is a crucial indicator of an accelerator’s performance. The higher the luminosity, the higher the probability of new discoveries.</p> <p>Increasing the number of collisions, and therefore the number of particles in circulation, requires the protection of the LHC’s equipment to be reinforced, as particles that diverge from the trajectory can collide with sensitive components such as superconducting magnets and interfere with their operation. Protection is particularly important near the experiments. The billions of collisions occurring every second inside the detectors create the particles that are studied by the physicists. While almost all of these particles shoot off into the detector that surrounds the collision point, a miniscule number of them are emitted towards the tube where the beam circulates and can therefore reach the accelerator equipment.    </p> <p>The aim of the TANB absorber is thus to protect the accelerator equipment by stopping the particles near the LHCb experiment. During the current second <a href="https://home.cern/news/news/accelerators/key-plans-next-two-years-lhc">long technical shutdown</a> that will continue until 2021, the LHCb experiment will undergo <a href="https://home.cern/news/news/experiments/transforming-lhcb-whats-store-next-two-years">major upgrades</a> to enable it to record five times as many collisions from 2021 onwards. This collision rate will be kept at the same level for LHCb when the High-Luminosity LHC comes into service. </p> <p>“Two of the same type of absorbers are already used on either side of the ATLAS and CMS experiments,” explains project leader Francisco Sanchez Galan.  “However, we had to come up with a new design for LHCb, notably owing to a lack of space inside the accelerator.” Space is at a premium in the LHC, especially around the experiments. Therefore, it was necessary to design the simplest and most compact absorber possible.</p> <p>Simplifying things can sometimes turn out to be very complicated. After a detailed design study and numerous simulations, engineers proved that it was possible to design an absorber that was more compact yet just as effective by positioning the equipment further away. Several models were proposed and the optimal absorber was finalised on paper before being manufactured in Germany.  It measures only 65 centimetres in depth, as opposed to 5 metres for previous models.</p> <p>An innovative positioning table was developed at the same time. “All its actuators are positioned on the side with easy access. We had to develop this model because the lack of space makes the adjustment of traditional tables on all four sides difficult, and in addition we needed to limit intervention time,” says Francisco.</p> <p>Finally, the TANB’s integration was complicated by the lack of space. “Moving components and modifying the beam line allowed us to proceed millimetre by millimetre,” underlines Francisco. Mission accomplished, “thanks to the collaboration between numerous teams”, he smiles.  Two TANB models have now been installed on both sides of LHCb, ready for the next collision run and high luminosity.</p> <p> </p> </div> Wed, 04 Sep 2019 07:53:23 +0000 cmenard 11998 at https://home.cern LS2 Report: ATLAS upgrades are in full swing https://home.cern/news/news/experiments/ls2-report-atlas-upgrades-are-full-swing <span>LS2 Report: ATLAS upgrades are in full swing</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Anaïs Schaeffer</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/151" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">anschaef</span></span> <span>Tue, 09/03/2019 - 10:03</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A few months ago, the ATLAS Collaboration <a href="https://home.cern/news/news/experiments/wheels-motion-whats-planned-atlas-next-two-years">presented its schedule</a> for the second long shutdown 2 (LS2) concerning the detector’s repair, consolidation and upgrade activities. Since then, the experiment’s LS2 programme has been refined to best meet needs and constraints.</p> <p>Although ATLAS was originally supposed to install two new muon detectors in the forward regions (new small wheels) – measuring 9.3 metres in diameter and developed to trigger and measure muons precisely despite the increased rate of collisions expected at the <a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/high-luminosity-lhc">High-Luminosity LHC</a> (HL-LHC) – only one will be installed during LS2. “While considerable progress has been made on the assembly, the second wheel will not be ready before the end of LS2. So we decided to aim for installing that one in the next year-end technical stop (YETS, at the end of 2021),” says Ludovico Pontecorvo, ATLAS Technical Coordinator. A replacement of the first small wheel (on side A of the detector) is foreseen for August 2020.</p> <p>Another major component of the Phase-1 upgrade for ATLAS is the improvement of the trigger selection for the operation at the future HL-LHC, which requires new electronics to achieve a higher resolution of the electromagnetic calorimeter’s trigger. It also involves upgrading the level-1 trigger processors, and installing new electronic cards for the trigger and data-acquisition (TDAQ) system. “The installation of new electronics for the liquid-argon calorimeter is proceeding smoothly and we are advancing through the different stages of production for the TDAQ deliverables. The upgrade of the infrastructure and the necessary maintenance work is almost completed. The first phase of our HL-LHC upgrade programme has started,” says Ludovico Pontecorvo.</p> <p>In parallel, the consolidation of the detector system is progressing according to schedule. “We have replaced cooling connectors connecting the modules of the tile calorimeter to the overall cooling infrastructure in almost all 256 modules of the calorimeter and the standard maintenance of the read-out electronics is ongoing. In addition, the scintillators located between the central barrel and the extended barrels of the tile calorimeter are currently being installed,” adds Ludovico Pontecorvo. </p> <p>ATLAS teams are also preparing for the following long shutdown (LS3, starting in 2024), which will see the installation of an all-new <a href="https://atlas.cern/discover/detector/inner-detector">inner tracker</a>. Located at the centre of the ATLAS detector, the role of the inner tracker is to measure the direction, momentum and charge of electrically charged particles produced in each proton–proton collision. During LS3, an all-silicon inner tracker will replace the current one, using state-of-the-art silicon technologies to keep pace with the HL-LHC rate of collisions. The manoeuvre to lower and insert this new element (2 m in diameter, 7 m long) looks arduous, so, in March, the team in charge of its installation took advantage of the shutdown to practice the procedure in the cavern with a mock-up of the tracker. The two lowering options tested required a great meticulousness, given that, at the worst moment, the margin was only a few centimetres.</p> <p>_________<br /><em>* Don’t miss the ATLAS new muon small wheel at Building 191 during the <a href="https://opendays.cern/">CERN Open Days</a> on 14 and 15 September!</em></p> </div> Tue, 03 Sep 2019 08:03:41 +0000 anschaef 11983 at https://home.cern CERN Open Days: come and explore the future https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/cern-open-days-come-and-explore-future <span>CERN Open Days: come and explore the future</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/145" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">melissa</span></span> <span>Mon, 09/02/2019 - 11:50</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2679130" data-filename="OpenDays2019_OD_Logo_orange" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-7"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-7" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Open Days 2019 logo" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-067-7/file?size=small"/> </a> <figcaption> Logo of the CERN Open Days 2019 <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>On Saturday, 14 and Sunday, 15 September, CERN will open its doors to the public. Taking advantage of the second long shutdown of the <a href="/science/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">Large Hadron Collider</a>, the Laboratory will be offering visitors of all ages the exceptional opportunity to visit its facilities, discover its groundbreaking technologies, have fun with physics and meet the people who work at the cutting edge of science and technology.</p> <p>Some 150 activities are planned across nine of the Laboratory’s sites. During the two days, you will have the chance to operate a mini accelerator, learn about the medical applications stemming from research at CERN, drive a crane, discover the gigantic detectors and interact with scientists and invited guests. Places will be limited for the underground visits to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments, but there are many other things to discover on the surface. The full list of activities is available on the <a href="https://opendays.cern/">Open Days website</a>.</p> <p>The <a href="/science/accelerators">CERN accelerator complex</a> is currently in shutdown. Work is ongoing to improve the performance of the accelerators and detectors through several upgrades. This technical stop provides an opportunity to visit CERN’s underground facilities, along with many other areas that will be open to visitors for these two days only.</p> <p>“We look forward to welcoming our neighbours, as well as visitors from further afield, to the Open Days, where they will discover the fascinating research we do at CERN and the instruments we use. We are glad to have the opportunity to share with the public our passion for science and the impact of the technologies we develop. Visitors will be welcomed and guided  by scientists from all over the world and other CERN personnel,” says CERN’s Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti.</p> <p>To mark the beginning of this weekend of discovery, CERN’s Director-General will officially open the Laboratory’s doors at 8.30 a.m. on 14 September, at a ceremony attended by representatives of the local authorities.</p> <p>Between 30 000 and 40 000 visitors are expected each day. CERN strongly recommends using sustainable transport and all the sites will be accessible on foot or by bike. It will not be possible to drive onto or park on the visit sites. If you need to come by car, consider car-sharing. Car parks will be available near CERN and shuttles and bus services will take visitors to the visit sites. For people with disabilities, dedicated car parks and shuttles will be available.</p> <p><br /><strong>Practical information:</strong></p> <p>Register at <a href="https://opendays.cern/plan-your-visit">opendays.cern/plan-your-visit</a> and plan your visit using the Open Days app: <a href="https://opendays.cern/app">opendays.cern/app</a></p> <p>For safety reasons, the following roads will be closed to traffic on 14 and 15 September:</p> <ul><li>Route de l’Europe (France)</li> <li>Route de la Vie Chenaille in Echenevex (France), between the D984C and the corner of Route François Estier</li> <li>Route de Meyrin, between the Porte de France roundabout and Route du Mandement (France and Switzerland)</li> <li>Route de Meyrin in Ferney-Voltaire (France) and Avenue Auguste-François-Dubois (Switzerland) in the France-Switzerland direction.</li> </ul><p>The Open Days will take place from 9.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m.</p> <p>Journalists are invited to register for the event using the following link: <a href="https://indico.cern.ch/event/820109/registrations/51031/">indico.cern.ch/event/820109/registrations/51031</a></p> <p><strong>Resources:</strong></p> <p>Open Days website: <a href="https://opendays.cern">opendays.cern</a></p> <p>Videos: <a href="https://videos.cern.ch/record/2680159">videos.cern.ch/record/2680159</a>; <a href="https://videos.cern.ch/record/2684081">https://videos.cern.ch/record/2684081</a>;<a href="https://videos.cern.ch/record/2685153"> https://videos.cern.ch/record/2685153</a></p> <p>Press release of 19 June 2019: <a href="https://home.cern/news/press-release/cern/cern-invites-public-explore-future-its-open-days">home.cern/news/press-release/cern/cern-invites-public-explore-future-its-open-days</a></p> <p>Photos from previous Open Days: <a href="https://cds.cern.ch/yourbaskets/display_public?bskid=23896">cds.cern.ch/yourbaskets/display_public?bskid=23896</a></p> </div> Mon, 02 Sep 2019 09:50:08 +0000 melissa 11972 at https://home.cern Sensor used at CERN could help gravitational-wave hunters https://home.cern/news/news/engineering/sensor-used-cern-could-help-gravitational-wave-hunters <span>Sensor used at CERN could help gravitational-wave hunters</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Ana Lopes</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">achintya</span></span> <span>Fri, 08/30/2019 - 15:16</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2688057" data-filename="nutshell" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-104-1"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-104-1" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Images for article on seismic sensors" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-104-1/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Aerial view of the Advanced Virgo detector, where a precision laser interferometer used at CERN was installed and is being tested (Image: Virgo collaboration) <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>It started with a relatively simple goal: create a prototype for a new kind of device to monitor the motion of underground structures<strong> </strong>at CERN. But the project – the result of a collaboration between CERN and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia – quickly evolved. The prototype turned into several full-blown devices that can potentially serve as early warning systems for earthquakes and can be used to monitor other seismic vibrations. What’s more, the devices, called precision laser inclinometers, can be used at CERN and beyond. The researchers behind the project are now testing one device at the Advanced Virgo detector, which <a href="/news/news/physics/cern-congratulates-discoverers-gravitational-waves">recently detected</a> gravitational waves – tiny ripples in the fabric of space-time that were predicted by Einstein a century ago. If all goes to plan, this device could help gravitational-wave hunters minimise the noise that seismic events cause on the waves’ signal.</p> <p>Unlike traditional seismometers, which detect ground motions through their effect on weights hanging from springs, the precision laser inclinometer (PLI) measures their effect on the surface of a liquid. The measurement is done by pointing laser light at a liquid and seeing how it is reflected. Compared to weight–spring seismometers, the PLI can detect angular motion in addition to translational motion (up-and-down and side-to-side), and it can pick up low-frequency motion with a very high precision.</p> <p>“The PLI is extremely sensitive; it can even detect the waves on Lake Geneva on windy days,” says principal investigator Beniamino Di Girolamo from CERN. “It can pick up seismic motion that has a frequency between 1 mHz and 12.4 Hz with a sensitivity of 2.4 × 10<sup>−5</sup> μrad/Hz<sup>½</sup>,” explains co-principal investigator Julian Budagov from JINR. “This is equivalent to measuring a vertical displacement of 24 picometres (24 trillionths of a metre) over a distance of 1 metre,” adds co-principal investigator Mikhail Lyablin, also from JINR.</p> <p>The team assembled and tested the PLI prototype at JINR and at CERN’s TT1 tunnel. It performed so well that it showed the potential to be a helpful early warning seismic system for the <a href="/science/accelerators/high-luminosity-lhc">High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider</a> (HL-LHC) and other machines and experiments. The Large Hadron Collider and its proton beams are extremely robust to seismic activity, but the HL-LHC will use narrower beams to increase the number of proton–proton collisions and as a result the potential for particle-physics discoveries. This means beams are more likely to go off centre in the event of a high-magnitude earthquake with an epicentre relatively close to CERN. PLIs located at several points around the machine could serve as early warning systems for such events.</p> <figure class="cds-image" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-104-2"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-104-2" title="View on CDS"><img alt="home.cern,Industry and Technology" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-104-2/file?size=large" /></a> <figcaption>The PLI (bottom two plots) picked up the same signals as devices already installed at Virgo (top two plots) for an earthquake in Northern Italy on 17 August (Image: Beniamino Di Girolamo/CERN)</figcaption></figure><p>Given the PLI’s potential, the HL-LHC project has provided support to the team for the construction of  several new PLIs. One is already installed at the Garni Seismic Observatory in Armenia and another has been deployed with the support of CERN’s <a href="https://kt.cern/">Knowledge Transfer group</a> and Italy’s INFN institute to the European Gravitational Observatory in Italy, where Advanced Virgo is located. The Virgo PLI is the result of a collaboration that started after the <a href="https://indico.desy.de/indico/event/20154">APPEC conference in November 2018</a>, triggered by the JINR Director-General and encouraged by CERN Management. The collaboration went so smoothly that, less than a year later, the Virgo PLI was tested.</p> <p>The results from the first tests are encouraging. With just 15 minutes of data taken on 6 August, the PLI picked up the same signals as devices already installed at Virgo, and from that day onwards it started running continuously and detected several small-magnitude earthquakes. The Virgo and PLI teams are now setting up the flow of data from the PLI to the Virgo data system. This will make it easier to compare data from different seismic devices and to assess the PLI’s potential impact on Virgo’s operation and detection of gravitational waves. “Virgo and the two LIGO detectors in the US have recently begun another search for gravitational waves, one that will reach deeper into the universe than previous searches,” says former Virgo spokesperson Fulvio Ricci from La Sapienza University, Rome. “We’re confident that the PLI can play a part in this important search,” he added.</p> </div> Fri, 30 Aug 2019 13:16:39 +0000 achintya 11968 at https://home.cern From capturing collisions to avoiding them https://home.cern/news/news/knowledge-sharing/capturing-collisions-avoiding-them <span>From capturing collisions to avoiding them</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Kate Kahle</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">achintya</span></span> <span>Wed, 08/28/2019 - 13:47</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2231915" data-filename="highpileup1_4" id="CMS-PHO-EVENTS-2016-008-5"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CMS-PHO-EVENTS-2016-008-5" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Collisions recorded by the CMS detector on 14 Oct 2016 during the high pile-up fill" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CMS-PHO-EVENTS-2016-008-5/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> These proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV were recorded during the high pile-up fill of Run 2. The events are from isolated bunches with average pileup roughly around 100. <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>With about <a href="/resources/faqs/facts-and-figures-about-lhc">one billion proton–proton collisions per second</a> at the <a href="/science/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">Large Hadron Collider (LHC)</a>, the LHC experiments need to sift quickly through the wealth of data to choose which collisions to analyse. To cope with an even higher number of collisions per second in the future, scientists are investigating computing methods such as machine-learning techniques. A new collaboration is now looking at how these techniques deployed on chips known as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) could apply to autonomous driving, so that the fast decision-making used for particle collisions could help prevent collisions on the road.</p> <p>FPGAs have been used at CERN for many years and for many applications. Unlike the central processing unit of a laptop, these chips follow simple instructions and process many parallel tasks at once. With up to 100 high-speed serial links, they are able to support high-bandwidth inputs and outputs. Their parallel processing and re-programmability make them suitable for machine-learning applications.</p> <figure class="cds-image" id="CMS-PHO-TRACKER-1998-002-1"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CMS-PHO-TRACKER-1998-002-1" title="View on CDS"><img alt="tracker,readout,FED,PMC,CMS" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CMS-PHO-TRACKER-1998-002-1/file?size=large" /></a> <figcaption>An FPGA-based readout card for the CMS tracker (Image: John Coughlan/CMS/CERN)</figcaption></figure><p>The challenge, however, has been to fit complex deep-learning algorithms – a particular class of machine-learning algorithms – in chips of limited capacity. This required software developed for the CERN-based experiments, called “<a href="https://fastmachinelearning.org/hls4ml/">hls4ml</a>”, which reduces the algorithms and produces FPGA-ready code without loss of accuracy or performance, allowing the chips to execute decision-making algorithms in micro-seconds.</p> <p>A new collaboration between CERN and Zenuity, the autonomous driving software company headquartered in Sweden, plans to use the techniques and software developed for the experiments at CERN to research their use in deploying deep learning on FPGAs for autonomous driving. Instead of particle-physics data, the FPGAs will be used to interpret huge quantities of data generated by normal driving conditions, using readouts from car sensors to identify pedestrians and vehicles. The technology should enable automated drive cars to make faster and better decisions and predictions, thus avoiding traffic collisions.</p> <p>To find out more about CERN technologies and their potential applications, visit <a href="https://kt.cern/technologies">kt.cern/technologies</a>.</p> </div> Wed, 28 Aug 2019 11:47:13 +0000 achintya 11960 at https://home.cern Celebrating 30 years of a giant LEP for humankind https://home.cern/news/news/accelerators/celebrating-30-years-giant-lep-humankind <span>Celebrating 30 years of a giant LEP for humankind</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">achintya</span></span> <span>Tue, 08/13/2019 - 15:20</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="43768" data-filename="" id="CERN-CE-0304009-01"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-CE-0304009-01" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Cleaning of the LEP tunnel wall at the intersection with cavern UJ17" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-CE-0304009-01/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>On this day thirty years ago, the <a href="/science/accelerators/large-electron-positron-collider">Large Electron–Positron collider (LEP)</a> saw its first collisions. Designed to study the recently discovered <a href="/science/physics/w-boson-sunshine-and-stardust">W</a> and <a href="https://home.cern/science/physics/z-boson">Z</a>  bosons, and to look for signs of the <a href="/science/physics/higgs-boson">Higgs boson</a>, it was a remarkable machine in many ways.</p> <p>When LEP was switched on in 1989, it was the largest scientific instrument ever made. It was proposed in the late 1970s and it took over 20 million work-hours for the machine to be realised. Between 1983 and 1988 LEP was the largest civil-engineering project in Europe.</p> <p>After eleven years of fruitful research, including helping determine that there are only three generations of neutrinos, the accelerator was decommissioned in 2000. However, its legacy lives on: LEP’s 27-km tunnel was reused to house the <a href="/about/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">Large Hadron Collider (LHC)</a>. Now, as particle physicists discuss an <a href="https://europeanstrategyupdate.web.cern.ch/">update to the European Strategy of Particle Physics</a> and plan an accelerator that will eventually supersede the LHC, LEP is an important reminder of the long-term nature of pursuing fundamental knowledge.</p> <p>This short video tells the story of LEP, from planning and construction to its invaluable research outputs:</p> <figure><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="400" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/R3xSswz6Moc" width="560"></iframe> <figcaption>(Video: CERN)</figcaption></figure></div> Tue, 13 Aug 2019 13:20:11 +0000 achintya 11848 at https://home.cern LS2 Report: New SPS beam dump takes shape https://home.cern/news/news/accelerators/ls2-report-new-sps-beam-dump-takes-shape <span>LS2 Report: New SPS beam dump takes shape</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Achintya Rao</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">achintya</span></span> <span>Tue, 08/13/2019 - 09:44</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2677262" data-filename="201905-147_02" id="CERN-PHOTO-201901-147-2"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201901-147-2" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="TIDVG#5 mock-up assembly in BA5, dismantling and re installing beamline in SPS tunnel" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201901-147-2/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Dismantling of beamline BA5 "decabling, dismantling and enlargement of tunnel in new beamline, cabling, rebuild LS5 beamline" 90% vacuum around SPS. Remove beam dump remove from BA1 to install new one in BA5. New beam dump on surface (test in b.899) <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>By the end of the <a href="/tags/long-shutdown-2">second long shutdown (LS2)</a> of <a href="/science/accelerators/accelerator-complex">CERN’s accelerator complex</a>, a nine-metre-long object with several hundred tonnes of shielding will be installed around the beam line of the <a href="/science/accelerators/super-proton-synchrotron">Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS)</a>. But this object, the longest single component of the SPS, is no ordinary one. It contains the new beam dump of the SPS, designed to absorb beams of particles whose flight through the SPS needs to be terminated. Deep inside the complex device will sit the actual absorbing elements of the dump, containing graphite, molybdenum and tungsten. This core will be sheathed in layers of concrete, cast-iron shielding (painted green per CERN’s colour schemes) and marble. The new beam dump will help absorb particle beams with a wide range of energies – from 14 to 450 GeV – and is being built as part of the <a href="/news/opinion/accelerators/time-lhc-injectors-upgrade-project">LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) project</a>.</p> <p>As discussed in <a href="/news/news/accelerators/ls2-report-sps-receives-major-facelift-new-beam-dump">a previous LS2 Report</a>, the old beam dump of the SPS – located at <a href="https://maps.cern.ch/?n=%5B'SPS-BA1%20ENTRANCE%20/%20GATE'%5D">Point 1 of the accelerator’s ring</a> – is being replaced by a new one at <a href="https://maps.cern.ch/?n=%5B'SPS-BA5%20ENTRANCE%20/%20GATE'%5D">Point 5</a>, in preparation for the <a href="/science/accelerators/high-luminosity-lhc">High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC)</a>. Since the older object would be unable to cope with the higher beam intensities needed for the HL-LHC, which will come online in 2026, the SPS team decided five years ago to construct a new dump with the required properties. The re-design was needed because the higher intensities will result in the dump undergoing much larger mechanical forces over the course of its lifetime, necessitating a more robust device than before.</p> <p>“We considered building an external dump outside the SPS tunnel, similar to the one the LHC has,” explains Etienne Carlier, from CERN’s Technology department. “But the large dynamic range of the SPS beams makes it impossible to extract the different beams with one system. So we decided to use an internal dump, which is part of the SPS itself.” Building this beam dump is one of the most important tasks in the framework of the LIU project and around 125 metres of the SPS tunnel will be modified to accommodate it. There are several challenges along the way, involving the dedicated infrastructure required, which includes new kicker magnets, an optical system to monitor the beam position and cooling and ventilation systems.</p> <p>The kickers located before an accelerator’s beam dump are responsible for deflecting the beam off its usual path and sweeping it into the dump block. At a precise instant, they need to generate suitable electromagnetic pulses in the vertical and horizontal planes to do so. The vertical kicker system generates a pulse of up to 650 MW during one SPS revolution with the help of the most powerful pulse-forming network built at CERN. It uses two newly developed redundant 36-kV solid-state switches, which will operate in parallel for machine protection, to transfer the stored energy to the magnet. “The kicker deflects and dilutes the beam in such a way that it can be absorbed along the length of the dump core,” notes Carlier. “And because it has to always deflect the beam at the same angle independent of the beam energy, the charge build-up in the capacitor bank is proportional to the energy of the circulating beams.”</p> <figure class="cds-image" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-101-3"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-101-3" title="View on CDS"><img alt="home.cern,Accelerators" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-101-3/file?size=large" /></a> <figcaption>The kicker switch<span> (Image: CERN)</span></figcaption></figure><p>SPS operators need to know whether beams are being dumped correctly or not, by observing their shape and distribution as they enter the dump volume. “We need to have this information so we know that the dump has a uniform heat profile when the beams enter it,” Carlier says. The beam profile will be recorded by means of a screen that will be installed in the path of the beams being dumped, as part of the “Beam Instrumentation TV” system. This intricate system is made of a 17-m-long optical line with five high-quality mirrors that transfer the beam image from the screen to a well-shielded camera located outside the beam dump, which the operators can monitor remotely in real time.</p> <p>The beam dump will have a dedicated vacuum sector surrounding the whole structure. The core itself is surrounded by copper shielding and will be water-cooled, while air ventilation will not only help with cooling but will also ensure that none of the air gets activated by the radiation of the core. After LS2, the dump will be baked out in the tunnel before the SPS receives beam, heating the graphite making up the dump core to 200 °C. Then, during machine operation, the dump block will be heated to higher temperatures by the impacting beams and the pressure within the dump will temporarily increase until the blocks are conditioned.</p> <p><a href="/news/news/accelerators/ls2-report-sps-receives-major-facelift-new-beam-dump">Preparations to house the gigantic structure are under way</a> in the underground caverns and tunnels where the SPS sits, and the dump itself is taking shape on the surface. The abutment upon which the beam dump will sit is being assembled in the cavern known as ECX5, where once the <a href="/science/experiments/ua1">UA1 detector</a> operated. This abutment has to be made of a special concrete, containing extremely low levels of cobalt and europium. These elements are easily activated by radiation and would therefore stay hot for a long time. Avoiding them comes at a high cost but ensures that the abutment doesn’t absorb too much radiation over the course of the dump’s lifetime. The abutment’s base will be affixed to the ground, while the layer just below the dump will be composed of movable concrete blocks.</p> <p>The civil-engineering work is expected to last until the end of this year, after which the beam dump will start to be assembled in its designated abode. Over the remaining months of LS2, the beam dump and its services will be readied for the beams that will arrive in 2021, as the LHC begins its third run.</p> <p>More photos of the beam dump’s shielding <a href="https://cds.cern.ch/record/2677262">on CDS</a>:</p> <p><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="360" scrolling="no" src="https://cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201901-147/export?format=sspp&amp;ln=en&amp;captions=true" width="480"></iframe></p> </div> Tue, 13 Aug 2019 07:44:45 +0000 achintya 11846 at https://home.cern Cleaner cruises thanks to particle accelerators https://home.cern/news/news/knowledge-sharing/cleaner-cruises-thanks-particle-accelerators <span>Cleaner cruises thanks to particle accelerators</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Maurizio Vretenar</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">achintya</span></span> <span>Mon, 08/05/2019 - 14:07</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2684913" data-filename="Orkans" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-096-1"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-096-1" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Using accelerators to clean the exhaust of ships" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-096-1/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Scientists are testing whether a particle accelerator can be used to clean up particulate matter emitted by the diesel engines on ships <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Maritime traffic is the single largest contributor to air pollution – a single cruise ship emits as much pollution as one million cars. Several technologies are being explored to reduce the pollutants in the exhausts of ships’ diesel engines. Accelerator scientists have proposed a solution that involves breaking down particulate matter as well as molecules of sulphur and nitrogen oxides with an electron-beam accelerator of a few hundred kilovolts, before safely extracting them using water. The <a href="http://aries.web.cern.ch/">ARIES (Accelerator Research and Innovation for European Science and Society)</a> Horizon 2020 project, coordinated by CERN, is working on a real-scale test of this technology.</p> <p>A first test was performed recently on an old and rusty Soviet-era Latvian tugboat named Orkāns (“storm” in Latvian), moored at the Riga shipyard on the Baltic Sea. The small vessel, procured by the Riga Technical University in Latvia, has an old but powerful engine that could easily be made available for the duration of the tests.</p> <p>A long pipe, equipped with several detectors, connected the tugboat to an accelerator-on-a-truck that was provided by the Fraunhofer FEP of Dresden in Germany. On the truck, the exhausts were treated in a specially built chamber, with the electrons from the accelerator inducing molecular excitation, ionisation and dissociation to break down the pollutant molecules. Before finally being released into the air, the pollutants from the exhausts were washed out using water in a small “wet scrubber”, designed and built by the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (INCT) of Warsaw in Poland, who originally proposed this novel accelerator-based approach.</p> <figure class="cds-image" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-096-2"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-096-2" title="View on CDS"><img alt="home.cern,Accelerators" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-096-2/file?size=large" /></a> <figcaption>The pipe connecting the ship to the accelerator-on-a-truck<span> (Image: AIRES/CERN)</span></figcaption></figure><blockquote> <p><span style="color:#000000;">This long pipe actually connects two worlds, the world of shipping and the world of scientific particle accelerators. Their technologies and their languages are entirely different, but if we succeed in having them working together, we have the potential for a great advance.</span></p> <p class="text-align-right"><span style="color:#000000;">– Test supervisor Toms Torims, Riga Technical University</span></p> </blockquote> <p>The first measurements confirmed the expected reduction in pollutants. The final results will be made available only after a full analysis has been carried out at different engine powers and operating conditions. The data collected by this experiment will be used to finalise the proposal for the next step in the progress of this technology. A dedicated project will be submitted to Horizon 2020, with the goal of installing and testing a specially designed accelerator on a real cargo ship, to be made available by the Italian Grimaldi shipping company.</p> <p>Read the full story in the latest issue of <em>Accelerating News</em>: <a href="https://acceleratingnews.web.cern.ch/article/bringing-particle-accelerators-ships">https://acceleratingnews.web.cern.ch/article/bringing-particle-accelerators-ships</a></p> </div> Mon, 05 Aug 2019 12:07:24 +0000 achintya 11694 at https://home.cern CERN theorist shares Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics https://home.cern/news/news/knowledge-sharing/cern-theorist-shares-special-breakthrough-prize-fundamental-physics <span>CERN theorist shares Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/159" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abelchio</span></span> <span>Tue, 08/06/2019 - 16:00</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2194255" data-filename="MAX_2582" id="CERN-PHOTO-201606-141-1"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201606-141-1" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Celebrating Supergravity at 40" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201606-141-1/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Portrait of Sergio Ferrara, Dan Freedman and Peter van Nieuwenhuizen at the Council Chamber <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>CERN theorist Sergio Ferrara has been awarded the Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics, alongside Daniel Z. Freedman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Stanford University and Peter van Nieuwenhuizen of Stony Brook University. The trio is recognised for their 1976 invention of the theory of supergravity, which combines Einstein’s theory of general relativity with a theory called <a href="/science/physics/supersymmetry">supersymmetry</a>.</p> <p>“This award comes as a complete surprise,” says Ferrara. “Supergravity is an amazing thing because it extends general relativity to a higher symmetry – the dream of Einstein – but none of us expected this.”</p> <p>Ferrara, Freedman and van Nieuwenhuizen invented supergravity soon after the discovery of supersymmetry, an extension of the <a href="/science/physics/standard-model">Standard Model</a> of particle physics. Developed in the 1960s and early 70s, the Standard Model describes all known particles and has since been confirmed by experiments. However, it was clear from the beginning that the model is incomplete. Among other features, it cannot explain <a href="/science/physics/dark-matter">dark matter</a> and it doesn’t include gravity, which is described by Einstein’s theory of general relativity.</p> <p>Supersymmetry offered a way to fill some of the gaps in the model by giving each fermion and boson in the Standard Model a “superpartner”: fermions would be accompanied by superpartner bosons, while bosons would have superpartner fermions. But supersymmetry doesn’t include gravity, and this is exactly what Ferrara, Freedman and van Nieuwenhuizen set out to fix.</p> <p>Ferrara, who was a CERN fellow from 1973 to 1975 and has been a CERN staff member since the 1980s, started discussing the problem with Freedman at the <em>École Normale Supérieure</em> in Paris in 1975 and then teamed up with van Nieuwenhuizen at Stony Brook University. The three theorists conducted a series of calculations on a state-of-the-art computer that resulted in a supersymmetric theory that included the “gravitino”, a superpartner fermion to a hypothetical boson that mediates gravity called the graviton. This theory of supergravity was described in a <a href="https://journals.aps.org/prd/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevD.13.3214">paper</a> that the trio published in 1976, and has since had a powerful impact on theoretical physics, including providing a basis for the ongoing effort to develop a full theory of quantum gravity.<br />  <br /> The $3 million Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics can be awarded at any time and, unlike the annual Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics, is not limited to recent discoveries. <a href="https://breakthroughprize.org/Laureates/1/P4/Y2018">Previous recipients</a> include Stephen Hawking, seven CERN scientists who led the effort to discover the Higgs boson at CERN, the LIGO and Virgo collaborations for the detection of gravitational waves, and Jocelyn Bell Burnell for the discovery of pulsars.</p> <p>Ferrara, Freedman and van Nieuwenhuizen will receive their prize at a ceremony at NASA’s Hangar 1 on 3 November, where the winners of the annual Fundamental Physics prize and of the Breakthrough Prizes in Life Sciences and Mathematics will also be honoured.</p> <p>See also the <a href="https://cerncourier.com/a/supergravity-pioneers-share-dollar-3m-breakthrough-prize/"><em>CERN Courier</em> article</a>.</p> </div> Tue, 06 Aug 2019 14:00:10 +0000 abelchio 11703 at https://home.cern Sixty years of the CERN Courier https://home.cern/news/news/knowledge-sharing/sixty-years-cern-courier <span>Sixty years of the CERN Courier</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Matthew Chalmers</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">achintya</span></span> <span>Mon, 08/05/2019 - 17:01</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2684937" data-filename="cern_courier_collage" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-097-1"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-097-1" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="CERN Courier collage" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-097-1/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> A collage of several covers of the CERN Courier over the years <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>In August 1959, when CERN was just five years old, and the <a href="/science/accelerators/proton-synchrotron">Proton Synchrotron</a> was preparing for beams, Director-General Cornelis Bakker founded a new periodical to inform staff what was going on. It was just eight pages long with a print run of 1000, but already a section called “Other people’s atoms” reported news from other labs.</p> <p>The <em>CERN Courier</em> has since transformed into an international magazine of around 40 pages with a circulation of 22 000 print copies, covering the global high-energy physics scene. <a href="https://cerncourier.com/">Its website</a>, which receives about 30 000 monthly views, was relaunched this month and provides up-to-date news from the field.</p> <p>To celebrate its diamond jubilee, <a href="https://cerncourier.com/a/weve-been-here-before/">a </a><a href="https://cerncourier.com/a/weve-been-here-before/">feature in the latest issue</a> reveals several gems from past editions and shows the ever-present challenges of predicting the next discovery in fundamental research.</p> <p>You can peruse the full archive of all <em>CERN Courier</em> issues via the <a href="https://cds.cern.ch/collection/CERN%20Courier%20Issues">CERN Document Server</a>.</p> </div> Mon, 05 Aug 2019 15:01:48 +0000 achintya 11696 at https://home.cern LHC à haute luminosité : des pelleteuses à 100 mètres sous terre https://home.cern/fr/news/news/engineering/high-luminosity-lhc-diggers-work-100-metres-underground <span>High-Luminosity LHC: diggers at work 100 metres underground</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Elisa Pospieszny</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/7476" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">camonnin</span></span> <span>Thu, 08/01/2019 - 14:29</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2648637" data-filename="20181025-7" id="OPEN-PHO-ACCEL-2018-008-28"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/OPEN-PHO-ACCEL-2018-008-28" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="HL-LHC civil engineering works at Point1, Meyrin, Switzerland." src="//cds.cern.ch/images/OPEN-PHO-ACCEL-2018-008-28/file?size=large"/> </a> <figcaption> Excavation of PM17 shaft, installation of wire mesh and lattice girders and shotcrete application. <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Dig, dig, dig. One hundred metres underground, excavation work is under way for the High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider project. This next-generation LHC, which will begin operation in 2026, will reach luminosities five to ten times higher than its predecessor. This increased number of collisions will increase the chances of observing rare processes.</p> <p>The worksites are Point 1 of the LHC in Meyrin (Switzerland), where the ATLAS experiment is located, and Point 5 in Cessy (France), which houses the CMS experiment. Following the excavation of two shafts around sixty metres deep in January, two underground halls and over a kilometre of technical galleries must now be dug. </p> <p>At the surface, ten buildings, five on each site, will be built in the coming months, to house electrical, ventilation and cooling equipment. The work began in 2018 and should be completed in 2022.</p> <p><iframe allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5PKTKqtGrv8" width="560"></iframe></p> <figcaption>Work for the High-Luminosity LHC is in progress. Video: CERN</figcaption></div> Thu, 01 Aug 2019 12:03:18 +0000 camonnin 11684 at https://home.cern n_TOF facility explores neutron imaging https://home.cern/news/news/physics/ntof-facility-explores-neutron-imaging <span>n_TOF facility explores neutron imaging</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Ana Lopes</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/159" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abelchio</span></span> <span>Mon, 07/29/2019 - 12:56</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2264555" data-filename="_DSC2715" id="CERN-PHOTO-201705-122-6"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201705-122-6" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="n_TOF EAR2" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201705-122-6/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> n_TOF Neutron Time of Flight at the PS at CERN <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>X-ray imaging is a widely used technique to image the interior of materials – anyone who has had their teeth or another part of their body X-rayed will be familiar with the images it produces. Less used is neutron imaging, which is better than X-ray imaging in some cases, for example imaging the interior of dense metals. The reason is that neutron beams that are intense enough for imaging are not easy to produce and are available at only a few facilities worldwide.</p> <p>The <a href="/science/experiments/ntof">n_TOF facility</a> at CERN has two intense neutron beams and normally uses them to study interactions between neutrons and atomic nuclei. However, the facility has recently started to explore the feasibility of also using one of its beams for imaging. And the <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2410-390X/3/2/32">first results</a> from this exploration look good: imaging of particle-producing targets that have been used or are designed to be used at the neighbouring <a href="/science/accelerators/antiproton-decelerator">Antiproton Decelerator</a> (AD) to produce antiprotons (the antiparticles of protons) has shown that the beam can reveal the samples’ internal structure.</p> <p>Neutron imaging is based on recording the attenuation of a neutron beam as it passes through a sample. The quality of the resulting image depends on several factors, including the energy of the neutrons at the sample’s position and the distance between the sample and the collimator that focuses the beam. Using a commercially available neutron-imaging camera, the n_TOF researchers set up a neutron-imaging station at n_TOF and analysed some of these factors. They then set out to test the imaging station with five antiproton-producing targets: two targets from the AD, which produces antiprotons by taking an intense proton beam from the <a href="/science/accelerators/proton-synchrotron">Proton Synchrotron</a> accelerator and firing it into a target made of dense metal; and three potential new targets for the AD that had previously been tested at the <a href="https://espace.cern.ch/hiradmat-sps/Wiki%20Pages/Home.aspx">HiRadMat facility</a>.</p> <p>One of the two AD targets was a spare, never used, whereas the other AD target and the three HiRadMat targets had been subjected to intense proton beams that could have damaged them. The n_TOF imaging of the targets showed their internal structure with good contrast and, in the case of the targets that had been exposed to proton beams, revealed deformation, bending or cracking of their interior. For two of the targets, the damage observed was confirmed by opening the target, and for one of these targets the damage was also confirmed by imaging at a neutron-imaging station at the <a href="https://www.psi.ch/en">Paul Scherrer Institute</a>.</p> <figure class="cds-image" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-091-1"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-091-1" title="View on CDS"><img alt="home.cern,Experiments and Tracks" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-091-1/file?size=large" /></a> <figcaption>Neutron image of one of the AD targets studied, showing damage to the target’s core (uneven boundaries of the thin black strip). Neither the damage nor the core itself can be seen with X-ray imaging<span> (Image: n_TOF collaboration)</span></figcaption></figure><p>The results served two purposes: they demonstrated the feasibility of using n_TOF’s neutron beam for imaging and they offered two-dimensional images of the inside of the antiproton-producing targets that would otherwise have been more difficult to obtain. Conventional imaging techniques such as X-ray imaging cannot penetrate the dense metals from which the targets are made to reveal their internal state and, if they were to be imaged with specialised imaging facilities outside of CERN, the targets would need to be transported and subjected to inspection before being handled.</p> <p>The next steps towards developing a full-fledged imaging station at n_TOF include improving the collimation system, which would lead to higher-resolution images, and adding equipment that would allow three-dimensional rather than two-dimensional images to be obtained.</p> </div> Mon, 29 Jul 2019 10:56:27 +0000 abelchio 11664 at https://home.cern CERN and ESA forge closer ties through cooperation protocol https://home.cern/news/news/knowledge-sharing/cern-and-esa-forge-closer-ties-through-cooperation-protocol <span>CERN and ESA forge closer ties through cooperation protocol</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/34" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">achintya</span></span> <span>Thu, 07/25/2019 - 16:05</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2684265" data-filename="LHC-and-space" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-093-1"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-093-1" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="A hybrid image of the LHC and space" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-093-1/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Part of this image shows the LHC tunnel with the accelerator in it while the rest of it shows galaxies, stars and nebulae in outer space <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>A new collaboration agreement between CERN and ESA, signed on 11 July, will address the challenge of operating in harsh radiation environments, which are found in both particle-physics facilities and outer space. The agreement concerns radiation environments, technologies and facilities with potential applications in both space systems and particle-physics experiments or accelerators.</p> <p>This first implementing protocol of CERN-ESA bilateral cooperation covers a broad range of activities, from general aspects such as coordination, financing and personnel exchange, to a list of irradiation facilities for joint R&amp;D activities. It also states the willingness of both organisations to support PhD students working on radiation subjects of common interest.</p> <figure class="cds-image" id="CERN-PHOTO-201907-191-3"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201907-191-3" title="View on CDS"><img alt="Protocol Office,technology,engineering,Quality,ESTEC,ESA" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201907-191-3/file?size=large" /></a> <figcaption>Franco Ongaro, Director of Technology, Engineering and Quality and Head of ESTEC, European Space Agency<span> (left) with Eckhard Elsen, CERN Director for Research and Computing (Image: Julien Ordan/CERN)</span></figcaption></figure><p>The agreement identifies seven specific high-priority projects: high-energy electron tests; high-penetration heavy-ion tests; assessment of EEE commercial components and modules (COTS); in-orbit technology demonstration; “radiation-hard” and “radiation-tolerant” components and modules; radiation detectors, monitors and dosimeters; and simulation tools for radiation effects.</p> <p>In some cases, important preliminary results have already been achieved: high-energy electron tests for the JUICE mission were performed in the CLEAR/VESPER facility to simulate the environment of Jupiter. Complex components were also tested with xenon and lead ions in the SPS North Area at CERN for an in-depth analysis of galactic cosmic-ray effects. These activities will continue and the newly identified ones will be implemented under the coordination of the CERN-ESA Committee on Radiation Issues.</p> </div> Thu, 25 Jul 2019 14:05:26 +0000 achintya 11647 at https://home.cern LHC’s cooling system, an energy source for CERN’s neighbours https://home.cern/news/news/engineering/lhcs-cooling-system-energy-source-cerns-neighbours <span>LHC’s cooling system, an energy source for CERN’s neighbours</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Anaïs Schaeffer</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/151" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">anschaef</span></span> <span>Wed, 07/17/2019 - 22:12</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Can fundamental physics keep you warm in winter? Using neurons, maybe? Think bigger! Like some industrial sites, scientific facilities can be used to heat living spaces. CERN is taking the first steps in this direction.</p> <p>On 26 June, <a href="https://www.paysdegexagglo.fr/lenergie-de-laccelerateur-de-particules-du-cern-recuperee-pour-la-zac-ferney-voltaire-innovation/">the Laboratory signed an agreement with the French local authorities</a> concerning the collection of heat from its facilities. From 2022 onwards, some of the hot water from the <a href="https://home.cern/science/accelerators/large-hadron-collider">Large Hadron Collider</a>’s (LHC) cooling system at Point 8 will be diverted and made available to the neighbouring <em>commune</em> of Ferney-Voltaire.</p> <p>“At CERN, many systems and installations (cryogenics, electronics, ventilation, etc.) are cooled using water: cold water is injected into the cooling circuit and the hot water produced is then collected and cooled by cooling towers, before being reinjected into the circuit,” explains Serge Claudet, CERN’s energy coordinator. “The hot water leaving the circuit can reach a temperature of 30°, which is very useful in the context of energy recovery.”</p> <p>With energy recovery in mind, some of the hot water collected at LHC Point 8 will be diverted to a parallel circuit that will supply <a href="http://www.terrinnov-spl.fr/zac-ferney-geneve-innovation-le-fonctionnement-du-reseau-danergie-en-quelques-minutes/">the heating system of a new area currently under construction in Ferney-Voltaire </a>(the new <em>zone d’aménagement concerté</em> (urban development zone, ZAC)). Thanks to CERN, up to 8000 people’s homes will be heated at a lower cost and with reduced CO<sub>2</sub> emissions.</p> <figure class="cds-image" id="CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-085-2"><a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-085-2" title="View on CDS"><img alt="home.cern,Civil Engineering and Infrastructure" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-HOMEWEB-PHO-2019-085-2/file?size=large" /></a> <figcaption>In blue, the new <em>zone d’aménagement concerté</em> (ZAC) currently under construction in Ferney-Voltaire. In red, the heat recovery network that will link LHC Point 8 to this new area (Image: Territoire d'Innovation)</figcaption></figure><p>“We have performed several studies and discovered that the same could also be done at other points of the LHC,” says Serge Claudet. “Notably, Points 2 and 5 could also provide heating for the neighbouring <em>communes</em>, and we are looking into the possibility of using heat collected at Point 1 to heat the buildings on CERN’s Meyrin site.”</p> <p>The work on the CERN side to connect Point 8 to the <em>commune</em> of Ferney-Voltaire has already begun and is scheduled to be completed by the end of the <a href="https://home.cern/news/news/accelerators/key-plans-next-two-years-lhc">second long shutdown</a>. “CERN is handling the construction of the heat recovery circuit up to the boundary of its site,” says Serge Claudet. “Beyond that point, the <em>Communauté d’agglomération du Pays de Gex</em> will take over and will install 2 km of pipes between CERN and the new ZAC.” Initial tests of the heat recovery network will be performed in 2021, with a view to coming into operation in 2022.</p> </div> Wed, 17 Jul 2019 20:12:05 +0000 anschaef 11588 at https://home.cern NA64 casts light on dark photons https://home.cern/news/news/physics/na64-casts-light-dark-photons <span>NA64 casts light on dark photons</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-byline field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden field--items"> <div class="field--item">Ana Lopes</div> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/user/159" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abelchio</span></span> <span>Mon, 07/22/2019 - 13:06</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2229237" data-filename="02__DSC0531" id="CERN-PHOTO-201611-278-3"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201611-278-3" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="The NA 64 experiment" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/CERN-PHOTO-201611-278-3/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> NA64 ECAL and HCAL. <span> (Image: CERN)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Without <a href="/science/physics/dark-matter">dark matter</a>, most galaxies in the universe would not hold together. Scientists are pretty sure about this. However, they have not been able to observe dark matter and the particles that comprise it directly. They have only been able to infer its presence through the gravitational pull it exerts on visible matter.</p> <p>One hypothesis is that dark matter consists of particles that interact with each other and with visible matter through a new force carried by a particle called the dark photon. In a <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/1906.00176">recent study</a>, the collaboration behind the NA64 experiment at CERN describes how it has tried to hunt down such dark photons.</p> <p>NA64 is a fixed-target experiment. A beam of particles is fired onto a fixed target to look for particles and phenomena produced by collisions between the beam particles and atomic nuclei in the target. Specifically, the experiment uses an electron beam of 100 GeV energy from the <a href="/science/accelerators/super-proton-synchrotron">Super Proton Synchrotron</a> accelerator. In the new study, the NA64 team looked for dark photons using the missing-energy technique: although dark photons would escape through the NA64 detector unnoticed, they would carry away energy that can be identified by analysing the energy budget of the collisions.</p> <p>The team analysed data collected in 2016, 2017 and 2018, which together corresponded to a whopping hundred billion electrons hitting the target. They found no evidence of dark photons in the data but their analysis resulted in the most stringent bounds yet on the strength of the interaction between a photon and a dark photon for dark-photon masses between 1 MeV and 0.2 GeV.</p> <p>These bounds imply that a 1-MeV dark photon would interact with an electron with a force that is at least one hundred thousand times weaker than the electromagnetic force carried by a photon, whereas a 0.2-GeV dark photon would interact with an electron with a force that is at least one thousand times weaker. The collaboration anticipates obtaining even stronger limits with the upgraded detector, which is expected to be completed in 2021.</p> <p>Read more about how the experiment is searching for dark matter in <a href="https://ep-news.web.cern.ch/content/exploring-dark-sector-na64-first-results-combined-analysis-2016-2018-runs">this EP newsletter article</a>.</p> </div> Mon, 22 Jul 2019 11:06:19 +0000 abelchio 11607 at https://home.cern Dutch artist Rosa Menkman wins Collide International Barcelona Award https://home.cern/news/news/cern/dutch-artist-rosa-menkman-wins-collide-international-barcelona-award <span>Dutch artist Rosa Menkman wins Collide International Barcelona Award</span> <span><span lang="" about="/user/199" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">abha</span></span> <span>Thu, 07/18/2019 - 09:47</span> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-list-cds field--type-cerncdsmedia field--label-hidden field--item"><figure class="cds-image" data-record-id="2683234" data-filename="Rosa%20Menkman" id="OPEN-PHO-MISC-2019-013-1"> <a href="//cds.cern.ch/images/OPEN-PHO-MISC-2019-013-1" title="View on CDS"> <img alt="Dutch artist Rosa Menkman, winner of Collide International Barcelona Award" src="//cds.cern.ch/images/OPEN-PHO-MISC-2019-013-1/file?size=medium"/> </a> <figcaption> Dutch artist Rosa Menkman, winner of Collide International Barcelona Award 2019 <span> (Image: Courtesy of the Artist)</span> </figcaption> </figure></div> <div class="field field--name-field-p-news-display-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Geneva and Barcelona. Dutch artist Rosa Menkman has been selected as the winner of the first Collide International award in Barcelona alongside four Honorary Mentions. The residency award, organised by Arts at CERN in partnership with the City of Barcelona and the Institute of Culture of Barcelona, received 228 entries from 49 countries.</p> <p>“The primary objective of Arts at CERN is to create extraordinary opportunities for dialogue and exchange between artists and scientists, and to encourage significant connections between creative minds in a fundamental research environment. I am particularly proud to announce the winners of the first Collide International prize in collaboration with the city of Barcelona,” says Monica Bello, head of Arts at CERN.</p> <p>“Here at CERN, we value diversity and exchange, across communities and countries. It is an inherent part of our laboratory’s culture and essential to the success of our research. We appreciate the strong partnerships that now allow us to welcome new artists to connect with our community. I am excited to see what they will achieve together with our scientists,” says Charlotte Lindberg Warakaulle, CERN’s Director for International Relations.</p> <p>According to the jury, comprised of Monica Bello, Arts at CERN, Oriol Gual, director of La Capella in Barcelona, Joana Hurtado, director of Fabra i Coats and Helga Timko, CERN physicist, the winning artist demonstrated a sophistication of concept and approach. Menkman’s topic focused on the idea of resolution, which resonates with CERN’s quest to perform research from the smallest to the largest scale. They found Menkman’s argument about the significance and purpose of scientific measurement and how information is filtered in and out of an experiment inspiring. The artist will be invited to CERN in Geneva for two months to explore these topics, after which she will work for a month on a 3D video production at Fabra i Coats.</p> <p>“Barcelona City Council has the will to make the city a European capital in research and innovation through its Barcelona Science Plan. We have initiated several measures, which makes me particularly enthusiastic about the collaboration established with CERN, an alliance that will allow us to bring art and science to the citizens. I would like to congratulate all those who participated in this first edition in our city, especially Rosa Menkman, whom we will receive during her stay in Barcelona at Fabra i Coats – Art Factory and Barcelona’s Centre for Contemporary Art,” says Joan Subirats, Barcelona's Deputy Mayor of Culture, Education and Science.</p> <p>The Honorary Mentions are: Samoa Rémy from Switzerland, Addie Wagenknecht from Austria, Nathan Witt from the UK, and Barcelona-based artist Gabriella Torres from Puerto Rico. Their work presented abstract phenomena in tangible forms while demonstrating their ability to question and analyse the deeper meaning of physical observations.</p> <p>Collide International is Arts at CERN’s flagship programme and residency award, organised every three years in partnership with a city and a cultural organisation. The collaboration with Barcelona began with this first award and will continue until 2021.   </p> <p><strong>Further information:</strong><br /><a class="bulletin" href="http://cern.ch/arts/">Arts at CERN website</a><br /><a class="bulletin" href="https://www.facebook.com/ArtsatCERN/">Arts at CERN Facebook site</a><br /><a class="bulletin" href="https://twitter.com/ArtsAtCERN">Twitter ArtsAtCern</a></p> </div> Thu, 18 Jul 2019 07:47:13 +0000 abha 11593 at https://home.cern