13 TeV

On 5 April 2015, after two years of maintenance and upgrades, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started up at the collision energy of 13 teraelectronvolts (TeV). The decision to begin the LHC’s second run at 13 TeV has been taken in order to optimise the delivery of particle collisions for physics research, and thereby speed the route to potential new physics. An electronvolt is a unit of energy or mass used in particle physics. One eV is extremely small, and units of a million electronvolts, MeV, or a thousand million electronvolts, GeV, are more common. The LHC will ultimately reach 7 million million electronvolts, or 7 TeV per beam. One TeV is about the energy of motion of a flying mosquito.

8 results

Fast forward to physics

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Experiments
Experiments
Video

LHC progresses towards higher intensities

The LHC Operations team is tackling the challenges of a demanding beam regime with a series of rigorous tests

News
Accelerators
24 August, 2015
Accelerators
News
24 August, 2015

LHC Season 2: First physics at 13 TeV to start tomorrow

On 3 June, experiments at the LHC are set to collect their first physics data in two years, marking the start of the accelerator's second run

News
Accelerators
02 June, 2015

CERN takes to reddit to discuss new energy frontier

CERN researchers answered your questions about the birth of the web, data analysis, and the upcoming LHC physics at 13 TeV

News
Accelerators
29 May, 2015

CERN's two-year shutdown drawing to a close

Two years ago, CERN's accelerators and experiments shut down for maintenance, to prepare the LHC for running at 13 TeV

News
Accelerators
13 February, 2015
Accelerators
News
13 February, 2015